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The Classical Music Thread

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Hamju wrote:
    Sounds like a good one. Perhaps I'll pick it up for The Bells. I don't think I've ever heard it, but have heard good things.
    Yeah, I love that piece. I actually don't listen to Rachmaninoff too often anymore, but when I do it's that or the Paganini.

    Elendil on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Elendil wrote:
    Hamju wrote:
    Sounds like a good one. Perhaps I'll pick it up for The Bells. I don't think I've ever heard it, but have heard good things.
    Yeah, I love that piece. I actually don't listen to Rachmaninoff too often anymore, but when I do it's that or the Paganini.
    For me its usually his 2nd and 3rd piano concertos and Vespers Mass. Oh and a bunch of his shorter piano pieces.

    Hamju on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    crosspost
    Puccini wrote:
    Pinkerton
    la vostra età è di flebile umor.
    / Non c'è gran male
    | s'io vo' quell'ale
    | drizzare ai dolci voli dell'amor!
    | Sharpless
    | Quella divina
    | mite vocina
    \ non dovrebbe dar note di dolor.
    :whistle:



    Best


    Duet


    Ever


    any naysayers?

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Oedipus and Jocasta's duet in Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex is pretty badass

    Elendil on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Oh it's all about the Flower Duet by Delibes. Such wonderful music...


    Oh and that fugue thing is pretty funny. I only wish I could actually hear what all of what he was saying because I understood what I could hear, but unfortunately could hear so little.

    Hamju on
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    ErlkingErlking Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    As long as we're pulling out the kickass duets...

    Dio, Che Nell'alma Infondere from Verdi's Don Carlo

    I got to see two really great guys sing this live. Holy shit, the testosterone vibrated from the stage. I felt violated, but in a good way.

    Erlking on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    As much as I love Beethoven's Op. 111 sonata, I sometimes wonder if The Rite of Spring isn't my real favorite piece.

    Dear Christ.

    Elendil on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Elendil wrote:
    As much as I love Beethoven's Op. 111 sonata, I sometimes wonder if The Rite of Spring isn't my real favorite piece.

    Dear Christ.

    I'm still rocking the ninth as my favorite.

    Though the Große Fugue is coming up hardcore.

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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Elendil wrote:
    As much as I love Beethoven's Op. 111 sonata, I sometimes wonder if The Rite of Spring isn't my real favorite piece.

    Dear Christ.

    What recording(s) are you listening to and how are they?

    Tell me.

    I am obsessed with the Rite of Spring... I own the score and 12-15 recordings of it. I love it so very much.

    Hamju on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Hamju wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    As much as I love Beethoven's Op. 111 sonata, I sometimes wonder if The Rite of Spring isn't my real favorite piece.

    Dear Christ.

    What recording(s) are you listening to and how are they?

    Tell me.

    I am obsessed with the Rite of Spring... I own the score and 12-15 recordings of it. I love it so very much.
    I have Abbado with the London Symphony Orchestra. It's the only recording I've heard, but I've honestly never felt want of another.

    Elendil on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Elendil wrote:
    Hamju wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    As much as I love Beethoven's Op. 111 sonata, I sometimes wonder if The Rite of Spring isn't my real favorite piece.

    Dear Christ.

    What recording(s) are you listening to and how are they?

    Tell me.

    I am obsessed with the Rite of Spring... I own the score and 12-15 recordings of it. I love it so very much.
    I have Abbado with the London Symphony Orchestra. It's the only recording I've heard, but I've honestly never felt want of another.
    Oh man... you really should get another... there is truly so much to that piece that you should get another. There are so many parts that when the balance changes between conductors (and it commonly does) you'll notice different parts coming out and it'll sound almost new.

    I don't think I know that version, but if you're going to get another recording then I'd suggest Seiji Ozawa and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Boulez with the Cleveland Orchestra or Leonard Bernstein with the Israel Philharmonic.

    Hamju on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Symphony in Three Movements - STRAVINSKY
    Symphony No. 4, for piano and orchestra - SZYMANOWSKI
    Symphony No. 60 ("Il distratto") - HAYDN
    Suite from The Miraculous Mandarin - BARTÓK

    Whoa whoa whoa.

    You had me at the Stravinsky and Bartok.

    Elendil on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Hamju wrote:
    I don't think I know that version, but if you're going to get another recording then I'd suggest Seiji Ozawa and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Boulez with the Cleveland Orchestra or Leonard Bernstein with the Israel Philharmonic.
    Oh man, I'd love to hear what Boulez does with it.

    Elendil on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Elendil wrote:
    Hamju wrote:
    I don't think I know that version, but if you're going to get another recording then I'd suggest Seiji Ozawa and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Boulez with the Cleveland Orchestra or Leonard Bernstein with the Israel Philharmonic.
    Oh man, I'd love to hear what Boulez does with it.
    That CD also has him doing Prelude a l'Apres-midi d'un faunce and Nocturnes by Debussy. I'm pretty sure it won a grammy for best classical album the year it was released. It's very good.

    Hamju on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    So I just finished listening to Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, op.125. The "Choral." "The ninth." You know it. I haven't listened to it in three months because when I listen to it, I smirk and grin like a dolt, flail my arms around, and literally dance around and I am at college and can't really be alone and no one wants to see me like that. I am, both metaphorically and physically, exhausted and dripping with sweat.

    Because, holy fuck, I think I might get it.

    I think

    Beethoven's 9th is a four dimensional symphony, an earthly take on Dante's comedy.

    Now hear me out.

    The first three movements show the listener coping with the real world and its delusions. The warring, the personal anxiety, overly romantic naivete and harsh, crushing cynicism. In each movement, more noticeable in third and especially the second, we see some glimpses of shining light. It is not coincidental that this sound very familiar to motifs from the fourth movement.

    Now the fourth movement has been well documented to be a sort of symphony within a symphony. But this is not the only recursive elements. The shards of the earlier movements are this dimensional movement between the human perception of the world and the underlying truth within it. Thus, we have the strange elements of the ode to joy motif, not sounding quite right yet, as it makes it's ghostly appearances in the previous movements, almost like it is moving in between the inner truth and the real world. However, we see it in the cello and the basses in its first true form. This is our first view of the truth. I shall call it love, because I'm a romantic at heart, I guess. (You can call it whatever you want.) The first appearance is very bland and basic, as most cliches are. However, it is INCREDIBLY beautiful. Perhaps the greatest melody man has ever known. There is a reason Beethoven chose this melody to represent the most basic truth in a symphony about human life.

    Now a word about the symphony within a symphony. The REAL symphony is the inner symphony - as if the inner cube in a hyper cube were the real cube. THIS (Ode to Joy) theme, not the theme of the first movement, is the real first and important theme of the symphony. It is, again, the basic truth of the symphony. This is the first sonata to appear in the symphony.

    I have viewed this as an elaborate dance. There are hundreds of dancers performing a beautiful dance. Three of them, to be precise. (The first three movements) But then they start peeling away, and that last hum before the first apperance of Ode to Joy is the last group kneeling down to reveal the most beautiful person you have ever seen. She does not even dance. This non dancing is the first appearance of Ode to Joy. It is simple and beautiful, and does not need movement. It simply IS. When the other insturments join in, this athena begins to move. Her movements are natural and expected, but still completely and perfectly beautiful. By moving, she obscures her beauty - her essential truth -but she seems to be even more truthful, real, and human by moving and obscuring her nature. People begin to dance with her, and you begin to have a better understanding of life. She is your Virgil and your Beatrice - your guide understanding life. She keeps moving, as do the others, in a perfectly expected and perfectly gratifying way. Until, that is, too many people join, and the movements become different, yet you seem to understand more and more.

    She is ready to take you back to the real world. When the choir pics up the melody, she shows you her basic looks and movements manifested in life. As I have chosen love, her nature is manifested in some natural and beautiful image of love. The listener, knowing what is to be expected, sees all ill-perceptions and disordered notions melt away. He/She sees these lovers for the first time, and truly understands.

    However, this is a symphony. By bringing us to the real world, we return to the previous movements three movements of the "outer" symphony we first heard. However, we see them in a completely new light, knowing the inner truths of the world. We see how pride in one's nation should be - not the warring rage of the second movement, but the healthy, loving pride of the beerhall plunkety plunkys in the inner symphony. The third movement, a sort of romantic naivete, is transformed into my personal favorite melody of the symphony, and is a triumphal display of true romantic love, courage, and agape. The closer the "inner" (really, remember, the outer) sounds are to "ode to joy" the c closer they are to "JOY"- an acceptance and striving to meet this inner truth.

    The last, very chaotic, shows the listener being shown by our guide life in all it's ineffable chaotic beauty, with all of love's (joy, or whatever truth you want to describe) beautiful, beautiful, beautiful manifestations. Beethoven's ninth is a celebration of life and truth and beauty.

    Oh good that was rambling. I hope you get my point, and think I'm not COMPLETELY off base.

    Podly on
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    ElJeffeElJeffe Roaming the streets, waving his mod gun around.Moderator, ClubPA Mod Emeritus
    edited January 2007
    You're way off base, Poldy. It's well established that Beethoven's ninth was actually just the soundtrack for a nineteenth century porno. The chaos of the final movement parallels the wild discord of a man's bucking in the last throes of ecstacy, culminating in a wild, sloppy crescendo as he unloads all over his woman's face.

    This is elementary stuff, Poldy.

    ElJeffe on
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    The Green Eyed MonsterThe Green Eyed Monster i blame hip hop Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    I thought it was about God or something? Like in a roundabout way maybe?

    The Green Eyed Monster on
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    Lord Of The PantsLord Of The Pants Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    ElJeffe wrote:
    You're way off base, Poldy. It's well established that Beethoven's ninth was actually just the soundtrack for a nineteenth century porno. The chaos of the final movement parallels the wild discord of a man's bucking in the last throes of ecstacy, culminating in a wild, sloppy crescendo as he unloads all over his woman's face.

    This is elementary stuff, Poldy.

    Philistine

    Lord Of The Pants on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    deus caritas est, cel.

    deus caritas est

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Goddamn, I love Brahms. I've loved everything I've heard by him so far.

    That is no mean feat.

    Elendil on
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    SUPERSUGASUPERSUGA Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    I'm getting stuck in a Rachmaninoff Rut. Not that this is a bad thing but I need to find a new love. Sure there's Beethoven and Tchaicovsky but that's different. Suggestions in the Romantic style?

    Maybe I'll just go and listen to Rhapsody on a Theme of Paginini for the millionth time.

    SUPERSUGA on
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    StoverStover Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Podly wrote:
    So I just finished listening to Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, op.125. The "Choral." "The ninth." You know it. I haven't listened to it in three months because when I listen to it, I smirk and grin like a dolt, flail my arms around, and literally dance around and I am at college and can't really be alone and no one wants to see me like that. I am, both metaphorically and physically, exhausted and dripping with sweat.

    Because, holy fuck, I think I might get it.

    I think

    Beethoven's 9th is a four dimensional symphony, an earthly take on Dante's comedy.

    Now hear me out.

    The first three movements show the listener coping with the real world and its delusions. The warring, the personal anxiety, overly romantic naivete and harsh, crushing cynicism. In each movement, more noticeable in third and especially the second, we see some glimpses of shining light. It is not coincidental that this sound very familiar to motifs from the fourth movement.

    Now the fourth movement has been well documented to be a sort of symphony within a symphony. But this is not the only recursive elements. The shards of the earlier movements are this dimensional movement between the human perception of the world and the underlying truth within it. Thus, we have the strange elements of the ode to joy motif, not sounding quite right yet, as it makes it's ghostly appearances in the previous movements, almost like it is moving in between the inner truth and the real world. However, we see it in the cello and the basses in its first true form. This is our first view of the truth. I shall call it love, because I'm a romantic at heart, I guess. (You can call it whatever you want.) The first appearance is very bland and basic, as most cliches are. However, it is INCREDIBLY beautiful. Perhaps the greatest melody man has ever known. There is a reason Beethoven chose this melody to represent the most basic truth in a symphony about human life.

    Now a word about the symphony within a symphony. The REAL symphony is the inner symphony - as if the inner cube in a hyper cube were the real cube. THIS (Ode to Joy) theme, not the theme of the first movement, is the real first and important theme of the symphony. It is, again, the basic truth of the symphony. This is the first sonata to appear in the symphony.

    I have viewed this as an elaborate dance. There are hundreds of dancers performing a beautiful dance. Three of them, to be precise. (The first three movements) But then they start peeling away, and that last hum before the first apperance of Ode to Joy is the last group kneeling down to reveal the most beautiful person you have ever seen. She does not even dance. This non dancing is the first appearance of Ode to Joy. It is simple and beautiful, and does not need movement. It simply IS. When the other insturments join in, this athena begins to move. Her movements are natural and expected, but still completely and perfectly beautiful. By moving, she obscures her beauty - her essential truth -but she seems to be even more truthful, real, and human by moving and obscuring her nature. People begin to dance with her, and you begin to have a better understanding of life. She is your Virgil and your Beatrice - your guide understanding life. She keeps moving, as do the others, in a perfectly expected and perfectly gratifying way. Until, that is, too many people join, and the movements become different, yet you seem to understand more and more.

    She is ready to take you back to the real world. When the choir pics up the melody, she shows you her basic looks and movements manifested in life. As I have chosen love, her nature is manifested in some natural and beautiful image of love. The listener, knowing what is to be expected, sees all ill-perceptions and disordered notions melt away. He/She sees these lovers for the first time, and truly understands.

    However, this is a symphony. By bringing us to the real world, we return to the previous movements three movements of the "outer" symphony we first heard. However, we see them in a completely new light, knowing the inner truths of the world. We see how pride in one's nation should be - not the warring rage of the second movement, but the healthy, loving pride of the beerhall plunkety plunkys in the inner symphony. The third movement, a sort of romantic naivete, is transformed into my personal favorite melody of the symphony, and is a triumphal display of true romantic love, courage, and agape. The closer the "inner" (really, remember, the outer) sounds are to "ode to joy" the c closer they are to "JOY"- an acceptance and striving to meet this inner truth.

    The last, very chaotic, shows the listener being shown by our guide life in all it's ineffable chaotic beauty, with all of love's (joy, or whatever truth you want to describe) beautiful, beautiful, beautiful manifestations. Beethoven's ninth is a celebration of life and truth and beauty.

    Oh good that was rambling. I hope you get my point, and think I'm not COMPLETELY off base.

    Well shit. Here I was thinking that it just sounded nice.

    Stover on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    SUPERSUGA wrote:
    I'm getting stuck in a Rachmaninoff Rut. Not that this is a bad thing but I need to find a new love. Sure there's Beethoven and Tchaicovsky but that's different. Suggestions in the Romantic style?

    Maybe I'll just go and listen to Rhapsody on a Theme of Paginini for the millionth time.

    Dvorak's pretty good and Prokofiev has some neat things, but there's really no good replacement for Rach. Although, Liszt is close.

    Hamju on
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    Lord Of The PantsLord Of The Pants Registered User regular
    edited February 2007
    You know, it's been a semester break since I studied all that crap but i've forgotten it all.

    However, Mahler is nice.

    Lord Of The Pants on
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    CheezyCheezy Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Can someone recommend me something for a casual listener?

    Cheezy on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Pachelbel's Cannon in D

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    CheezyCheezy Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    And I thank you.

    Cheezy on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Maybe something by Debussy?

    Elendil on
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    CheezyCheezy Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Any particular piece?

    Cheezy on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Clair de Lune

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Podly wrote: »
    Pachelbel's Cannon in D
    I can't tell whether or not you're trying to be mean.

    YosemiteSam on
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    DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    I'm a sucker for popular classics. 1812 Overture and Flight of the valkaries come to mind. Also fuck Pachelbel.

    Doodmann on
    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    I like to ART
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Doodmann wrote: »
    Flight of the valkaries

    ANGER>>>>>RISING!

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    DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    I guess I'm mostly just a fan of classical music in a contemporary setting (like the two examples I mentioned).

    Doodmann on
    Whippy wrote: »
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Doodmann wrote: »
    I guess I'm mostly just a fan of classical music in a contemporary setting (like the two examples I mentioned).
    :?:

    In other news, Scriabin's Op. 74 No. 2 prelude is creepy as all fuck. Man.

    Elendil on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Also, I've been getting into Debussy's piano music. Fucking amazing stuff.

    Elendil on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Elendil wrote: »
    Also, I've been getting into Debussy's piano music. Fucking amazing stuff.

    It sure is. I bought a boxed set a few years ago with all of Debussy's and Ravel's piano music and it is quite amazing. Some of his pieces are mind-blowing, although I think my favourite Debussy is probably his 3 nocturnes.

    Hamju on
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    setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    The Marriage of Figaro is always fun times, whether you're listening to one song or the whole thing.

    setrajonas on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    I've never been a big fan of opera, but I think I might get more into it this summer. This last term I performed in two (just chorus work, no parts) and they were a lot of fun. Suor Angelica is this uber depressing Puccini opera about a nunnery and this one woman who is sent there after having a child out of wedlock (ok, so I really wasn't in that one until the last 30 seconds when I sang off-stage, but I was still in the program :P ), but the other was l'enfant et les sortiliges, this coked up opera about a disobedient boy that Ravel wrote when he was most likely on opium and/or absynth.
    The Ravel was so much fun, with some really awesome music. Basically the premise is that this little boy throws a temper-tantrum and trashes his room. After destroying a whole bunch of different things everything that he's hurt comes alive and attacks him. The first song after the tantrum is when these two chairs yell at him, dance around and actually have a love duet. It's really weird.
    However, I think my favourite part is the numbers chorus where his math homework comes alive and torments him. Because he's torn it all up the numbers are all jumbled and don't make any sense so the chorus sings things like, "four times nine, ninety-three!" and the first half of word problems and it's just sooo awesome. Anywho, if you get a chance, you should look into it. It was very-well received.

    Hamju on
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