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The Classical Music Thread

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    Big DookieBig Dookie Smells great! Houston, TXRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    This is the most pretentious thread ever.

    That said, I'll throw my own pretentious hat in with the Romantic period crowd - there's some really great music back then. Obviously Schumann, Chopin and the like are great, but my favorites are probably Dvorak and Smetana. I absolutely love The Moldau. Another great one is Rimsky-Korsakov's Sheherazade. What an incredible, intense piece of music.

    However, what's with all the Baroque hate? There is some awesome music from that time period. When you can achieve such a creative and complex piece such as Brandenburg with only three instruments, that really says something.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Big Dookie wrote:
    This is the most pretentious thread ever.

    That said, I'll throw my own pretentious hat in with the Romantic period crowd - there's some really great music back then. Obviously Schumann, Chopin and the like are great, but my favorites are probably Dvorak and Smetana. I absolutely love The Moldau. Another great one is Rimsky-Korsakov's Sheherazade. What an incredible, intense piece of music.

    However, what's with all the Baroque hate? There is some awesome music from that time period. When you can achieve such a creative and complex piece such as Brandenburg with only three instruments, that really says something.

    What's so pretentious about classical music? Seriously? Because it's not rock?

    You definitely won't see any baroque hate coming from me. Brandenberg is some of my favorite pieces of music.

    Concerning Romantic Era - add to my list a specific Mendelsohn concerto. There's one with an amazing violin part.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    Also, Lizst.
    I only know him for Hungarian Rhapsodies. Anything else of note?

    I like Totentanz. And the Mephisto Waltz No. 4 is one of my favorite pieces for solo piano. Not as flashy as its more popular brothers, but in my opinion far cooler.

    Anyone ever heard of the atonal piece he composed? I'd love to hear that.

    Edit: Oh yeah. His piano transcriptions of Beethoven's symphonies are shockingly good.

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    Aroused BullAroused Bull Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?

    Piano Concerto No. 24 is excellent, and surprisingly unknown.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?

    Piano Concerto No. 24 is excellent, and surprisingly unknown.

    Unknown to me

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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    BTW, am I the only one who thinks that the only truly good piece of music Mozart wrote was his Requiem?
    Piano Concerto No. 24 is excellent, and surprisingly unknown.
    Unknown to me
    Available here, first on page

    I'm currently downloading it, as I've never heard it either.

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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    (I felt compelled to post on this thread, so after a few months of lurking, I finally went ahead and registered. This looks like an interesting place)

    My musical tastes are quite varied. Since I'm sure none of you want to listen to my reasons for liking my favourites, I'll just list them.

    Baroque period: The master of everything that is counterpuntal, JS Bach. Most specifically, The Art of the Fugue and The Brandenburg Concertos . Telemann is also quite an interesting composer. While I have no favourites from him, his various sonatas are quite nice.

    Classical period: As a bassoonist, it's a requirement to love K191 - Bassoon Concerto in Bb Major. Everyone has heard it, and it is quite a lovely piece. It's just rather boring once you have played it to death. Secondly, Mozart's Requiem is the only other Classical-era piece that I enjoy.

    Romantic period: van Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 and the Overture to Fidelio. Brahm's Symphony No. 1. Schumann's Symphony No. 3 . Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 2 and Symphony No. 6 'Pathetique' . Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition . Rimsky-Korsakov's Sheherazade. Elgar's Enigma Variations . Holst's The Planets Suite , First Suite in Eb Major for Military Band, Second Suite in F major for Military Band .

    Modern period: Debussy's Children's Corner, Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra , Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 2 , Shostakovich's Piano Concerto No. 3 and Symphony No. 7 'Leningrad' , Whitacre's Sleep, Ghost Train, and October.

    So, there's my shortlist of works that I really, really enjoy. I'm certainly surprised to see no one mention Sibelius. His Symphonic cycle is really quite awesome, even if none of them make my shortlist.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Shostakovich's Piano Concerto No. 3 and Symphony No. 7 'Leningrad'

    Nice to have you here. Especially someone who will discuss classical music. ;)

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    saggio wrote:
    So, there's my shortlist of works that I really, really enjoy. I'm certainly surprised to see no one mention Sibelius. His Symphonic cycle is really quite awesome, even if none of them make my shortlist.

    The 4th is a definite favorite of mine. Dark as all hell, but achingly beautiful.

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    StoverStover Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    My favorite music, by composer.

    Bach's Goldberg Variations is absolutely beautiful, if a bit on the long side (about an hour), as well as Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor. Also, his Mass in B minor, though that may sound a little odd to some.

    Beethoven's Piano Sonatas. Specifically, 8, 14, and 21. Most people have heard movements of these somewhere, just most people don't know the names.

    Brahm's Clarinet Quintet in B minor. Keep in mind, this is not five clarinets playing at once (which is what I initially thought when I looked at it, and why I picked it up in the first place).

    Chopin's Prelude in Db major (also known as Raindrop).

    Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man (I love band works)

    Debussy's Clair de Lune

    Erickson's Air for Band. I have never heard of anything else by this Erickson, but Air for Band is a quietly beautiful work for band.

    Hanson's Valdres March. One of my favorite peices of music of all time, and maybe the cheerful sounding march ever.

    Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody no. 2. You've all heard this, and I'm pretty sure there's a federal law somewhere that says you have to like it.

    Moussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition. I like the orchestrated version of this suite more than the piano (original) version, but that's just me.

    Mozart: Adagio, Clarinet Concerto in A, Turkish March, and Adagio for Glass Harmonica (KV356) [If anyone has this played by an actual glass harmonica, pm me please.]

    Franz Strauss's Horn Concerto in C minor. Seems to be little known, and it took me a while to find an actual copy of mine (I played it in my highschool wind ensamble) (I was not the soloist).

    Tarrega's Requerdos de la Alhambra. This is one of the few pieces of classical guitar music I have. If anyone could recommend some to me, that'd be great.


    Edit: I probably forgot a lot of things. But that's how it goes, I guess.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Classical guitar = Sabicas.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    I shall now go to bed.

    Cassical music thread: do not go gently into that sweet night.

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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Well, as fun as listing one's favourite works and composers, that gets boring fast. So, in an effort to spur further conversation, I'm going to pose a question.

    Which work do you think has been the most monumental or revolutionary in the past 4 centuries?

    I actually have three answers to this, but I'm going to withhold them and see if my thoughts jive with anyone else's before I write out my answer and rationale.

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    moribund peoplemoribund people Registered User new member
    edited January 2006
    Beethoven definitely changed the way music was done. A specific work I can't think of, but he really did change the scene.

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    ChaodoomChaodoom Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    There's no love for Rachmaninoff?

    His piano concertos have always made me feel all funny inside. I think I kind of grew up around No. 2 and No. 3.

    And if anyone makes a joke regarding that movie, Shine, I will fucking end him.

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    SithDrummerSithDrummer Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    I do believe that my favorite composer is a contemporary one: David Gillingham. He mostly writes pieces for percussion ensembles, but has a small number of full symphony creations. The Apocalyptic Dreams Symphony is particularly epic, and Stained Glass is an enjoyable piece as well.

    Outside of him, however, I have a lot of love for Tchaikovsky and Brahms.

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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Chaodoom wrote:
    And if anyone makes a joke regarding that movie, Shine, I will fucking end him.

    Fucking hated that movie.

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    Big DookieBig Dookie Smells great! Houston, TXRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Which work do you think has been the most monumental or revolutionary in the past 4 centuries?

    I am not well enough studied in classical music to even begin to answer that question definitively, but I can give a nomination at least I suppose.

    I'd throw a vote to Beethoven's 6th, the pastoral symphony. There isn't much in it that's extremely special (at least, compared to his other work - compared to earlier composer's work it's of course revolutionary). What makes it stand out is that, if I correctly recall, it's the first time a composer broke the "standard" rule of symphonies - that is, symphonies should be numbered (not named) and have four movements: a sonata, a slow movement, a minuet/scherzo, and a rondo/sonata, in that order. Not only did Beethoven change around the types of movements, but he also named each of them specifically. And most importantly, he added an extra fifth movement, something that was very unusual.

    This doesn't seem like a big deal, but it really opened up the floodgates to the romantic period. Suddenly composers are making however many movements they want, in whatever format they want, and they're using this freedom to make even more radical changes. Music becomes more emotional and more "fluid" in nature, all thanks to Beethoven's bold first step.

    So yeah, that's my contribution.
    Romantic period: van Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 and the Overture to Fidelio.

    Isn't Beethoven technically considered to be a composer from the Classical period? I know he was a "transition" composer and everything, but as far as musical historians are concerned, the classical period falls from 1750-1820 or so I believe, which is definitely when Beethoven was at the height of prominence. I could be wrong though.

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Big Dookie wrote:
    Isn't Beethoven technically considered to be a composer from the Classical period? I know he was a "transition" composer and everything, but as far as musical historians are concerned, the classical period falls from 1750-1820 or so I believe, which is definitely when Beethoven was at the height of prominence. I could be wrong though.
    Beethoven is considered the father of the Romantic period, and its first composer.

    I think you'd have to restrict that question to one century to make it more answerable.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Big Dookie wrote:
    Isn't Beethoven technically considered to be a composer from the Classical period? I know he was a "transition" composer and everything, but as far as musical historians are concerned, the classical period falls from 1750-1820 or so I believe, which is definitely when Beethoven was at the height of prominence. I could be wrong though.

    Depends on who you ask. The music clearly has traits of both eras. I personally tend to lump him in with the Classical period composers.
    saggio wrote:
    Which work do you think has been the most monumental or revolutionary in the past 4 centuries?

    Beethoven's "Eroica" and "Choral" symphonies are definite contenders. Maybe one of Schoenberg's early atonal works.

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    moribund peoplemoribund people Registered User new member
    edited January 2006
    I don't know who the first composer to write an atonal piece was. Was it Schoenberg?

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    bongibongi regular
    edited January 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Which work do you think has been the most monumental or revolutionary in the past 4 centuries?

    I don't claim to know a lot about classical music, but from what my dad tells me, Bach's St Matthew's Passion is certainly a contender.

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Holst's The Planets Suite , First Suite in Eb Major for Military Band, Second Suite in F major for Military Band .
    Which one has the second movement with the clarinet solo and the "dun. dun. dun. dun. da da da da da. da. da da da da da. da" (dun. = staccato quarter note, da = sixteenth note, da. = staccato eigth note). Because that's a really good movement.

    Not that I have an excuse not to know. I performed the piece like 3 months ago. :oops:

    Edit: It's the first suite.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    I don't know who the first composer to write an atonal piece was. Was it Schoenberg?

    Liszt, apparently.

    I'm not sure if that's the very first or not.

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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    What was the piece using only old fashioned metronomes?

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Fencingsax wrote:
    What was the piece using only old fashioned metronomes?

    Ligeti's Poeme Symphonique?

    That actually sounds pretty cool.

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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Fencingsax wrote:
    What was the piece using only old fashioned metronomes?

    Ligeti's Poeme Symphonique?

    That actually sounds pretty cool.

    I know. Too bad they can't do it anymore, as they stopped making old fashioned metronomes. (at least, I think they did).

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Fencingsax wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    Fencingsax wrote:
    What was the piece using only old fashioned metronomes?

    Ligeti's Poeme Symphonique?

    That actually sounds pretty cool.

    I know. Too bad they can't do it anymore, as they stopped making old fashioned metronomes. (at least, I think they did).

    Eh. That never stopped anyone. I have a recording of Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique performed on period instruments at the same concert hall where it premiered.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    To the poster for the most original piece:

    The 9th. Hands down. It's the theme of the European Union and Japan. It's themes have been played countlessly. It inspired hundreds of composers. It inspired poets and painters. It inspired a public to believe in music as more than just notes, and it continues to inspire today.

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    MukaikuboMukaikubo Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    stilist wrote:
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae.
    If you want energetic, you should check out Carl Off's O Fortuna. You'll probably recognise it as soon as you play it because it's been used a fair number of times for buildup in movies.

    I've got O Fortuna. Like it a lot. Also I've listened to all Beethoven's symphonies, and while I do love the 9th, it just doesn't reach me the way the 7th always does. *shrug*

    Anyone else?

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    stilist wrote:
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae.
    If you want energetic, you should check out Carl Off's O Fortuna. You'll probably recognise it as soon as you play it because it's been used a fair number of times for buildup in movies.

    I've got O Fortuna. Like it a lot. Also I've listened to all Beethoven's symphonies, and while I do love the 9th, it just doesn't reach me the way the 7th always does. *shrug*

    Anyone else?

    Mahler. All of Mahler.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    stilist wrote:
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae.
    If you want energetic, you should check out Carl Off's O Fortuna. You'll probably recognise it as soon as you play it because it's been used a fair number of times for buildup in movies.

    I've got O Fortuna. Like it a lot. Also I've listened to all Beethoven's symphonies, and while I do love the 9th, it just doesn't reach me the way the 7th always does. *shrug*

    Anyone else?

    It took me quite a while to really appreciate the Ninth, along with the rest of late Beethoven. However, when it hits, it hits. The Ninth has become my favorite symphony, the Op. 111 sonata my favorite piano sonata, and the Grosse Fuge my favorite of anything.

    And I still need to pick up the Missa Solemnis and the Diabelli Variations.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    stilist wrote:
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    The only classical music I have on my MP3 player right now is a Vienna Philharmonic production of Beethoven's 7th Symphony. I just loves me the last two movements of that so much... by far my favorite Beethoven work.


    So, people, suggest some other classical works for me to engulf! In general, I prefer faster tempo pieces, ones with more energy. Ex. I massively dig the Autumn section of Vivaldi's Four Seasons- not the most uptempo piece ever, but very energetic. Also Mozart's Dies Irae.
    If you want energetic, you should check out Carl Off's O Fortuna. You'll probably recognise it as soon as you play it because it's been used a fair number of times for buildup in movies.

    I've got O Fortuna. Like it a lot. Also I've listened to all Beethoven's symphonies, and while I do love the 9th, it just doesn't reach me the way the 7th always does. *shrug*

    Anyone else?

    It took me quite a while to really appreciate the Ninth, along with the rest of late Beethoven. However, when it hits, it hits. The Ninth has become my favorite symphony, the Op. 111 sonata my favorite piano sonata, and the Grosse Fuge my favorite of anything.

    And I still need to pick up the Missa Solemnis and the Diabelli Variations.

    As I've said before in here, I cannot hear the fourth movement and the choral piece of the 9th without jumping from all the joy and energy it creates. It's like a religious experiece.

    Definitely pick up Missa Solemnis. It's weird, though. As a Mass, it doesn't really work (As Beethoven was a Deist), but the music is great.

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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    There's an interesting little apocryphal story that says van Beethoven was introduced to some Hindu texts and concepts and that influenced much of his later work. I can't vouch for it, but it really casts alot of his later compositions into a new light.

    But, yes. Beethoven is generally considered to be the 'Father' of the Romantic period in western music. While he was alive during the tail end of the Classical period, the middle period of his life and the works that came out of it fundamentally changed music. Most specifically, his Fifth Symphony. With it's absolutely amazing orchestration, dynamic and emotional range, and, of course, the greatest motif ever penned (fate knocking at the door?), the Fifth Symphony was, in my view, the catalyst for Romanticism.

    As for the most revolutionary piece...I'd definitely have to go with The Rite of Spring by Stravinsky. Besides starting a riot at it's premiere in 1912, it marked the beginning of 'modern' music and musical sensibilities. It brought together aspects of atonality, it used very percussive offbeats and jarring rhythms, and the orchestration is just amazing. The bassoon solo that Stravinsky wrote off the top of the piece actually helped spur further development and refinement of the keywork for the bassoon, interestingly enough.

    I believe that van Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 is a very close second for the most revolutionary piece ever composed. It had everything that could be expected from a Romantic-era Symphony, but contained many forward looking bits and pieces. The symphony within a symphony (the fourth movement)is, in my view, one of the greatest pieces ever composed. By using a full chorus plus vocal soloists, van Beethoven opened the door towards musical experimentation ever further. It is also one of the first pieces to use large extended chords - which would eventually lead to new fangled things like flat nine chords and the like.

    The most important part of both of these pieces has to be their forward looking nature. Beethoven's Ninth anticipated everything up to the Second Viennese School, and Stravinsky. The Rite continues to affect composers today, just as the Ninth did for nearly a century.

    So, there are my thoughts. I'd like to hear some differing opinions, though.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    saggio wrote:
    There's an interesting little apocryphal story that says van Beethoven was introduced to some Hindu texts and concepts and that influenced much of his later work. I can't vouch for it, but it really casts alot of his later compositions into a new light.

    But, yes. Beethoven is generally considered to be the 'Father' of the Romantic period in western music. While he was alive during the tail end of the Classical period, the middle period of his life and the works that came out of it fundamentally changed music. Most specifically, his Fifth Symphony. With it's absolutely amazing orchestration, dynamic and emotional range, and, of course, the greatest motif ever penned (fate knocking at the door?), the Fifth Symphony was, in my view, the catalyst for Romanticism.

    As for the most revolutionary piece...I'd definitely have to go with The Rite of Spring by Stravinsky. Besides starting a riot at it's premiere in 1912, it marked the beginning of 'modern' music and musical sensibilities. It brought together aspects of atonality, it used very percussive offbeats and jarring rhythms, and the orchestration is just amazing. The bassoon solo that Stravinsky wrote off the top of the piece actually helped spur further development and refinement of the keywork for the bassoon, interestingly enough.

    I believe that van Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 is a very close second for the most revolutionary piece ever composed. It had everything that could be expected from a Romantic-era Symphony, but contained many forward looking bits and pieces. The symphony within a symphony (the fourth movement)is, in my view, one of the greatest pieces ever composed. By using a full chorus plus vocal soloists, van Beethoven opened the door towards musical experimentation ever further. It is also one of the first pieces to use large extended chords - which would eventually lead to new fangled things like flat nine chords and the like.

    The most important part of both of these pieces has to be their forward looking nature. Beethoven's Ninth anticipated everything up to the Second Viennese School, and Stravinsky. The Rite continues to affect composers today, just as the Ninth did for nearly a century.

    So, there are my thoughts. I'd like to hear some differing opinions, though.

    Some great points here. Is the first instrument a bassoon or an English horn? I can never tell. Two most important pieces of music for me as well, though I have them the other way around. ;)

    I always find it funny when people mention Chords like 13th or flat 9, because, as a jazz guitarist, those chords are like my babies!

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    13th? D:

    Rule of thumb: Your chords are too complicated when you're playing a different note on each guitar string and the chord is still incomplete. :)

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    13th? D:

    Rule of thumb: Your chords are too complicated when you're playing a different note on each guitar string and the chord is still incomplete. :)

    MyFunnyValentine_s.png

    Bitch.

    No 13th though. It's not that hard at all. I love to do a ii-V from a minor 9th to a 13th.

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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    Oh, dude. My Funny Valentine is my favourite jazz ballad EVER. I have so many different versions of it...With my all time favourite being JJ Johnson and Stan Getz. Just amazing, that is.

    Anyway...Yes, it's a bassoon at the very beginning of The Rite of Spring. It starts on the C above middle C and goes up to the D (or E, I can never remember) just above that. It's incredibly hard to play...Which sucks because you have to play it for every stupid freaking audition.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Oh, dude. My Funny Valentine is my favourite jazz ballad EVER. I have so many different versions of it...With my all time favourite being JJ Johnson and Stan Getz. Just amazing, that is.

    Anyway...Yes, it's a bassoon at the very beginning of The Rite of Spring. It starts on the C above middle C and goes up to the D (or E, I can never remember) just above that. It's incredibly hard to play...Which sucks because you have to play it for every stupid freaking audition.

    Yeah, I heard that the note is impossible because of the lips or whatever.



    But the best version of My Funny Valentine is Miles Davis and Bill Evans. Hands down.

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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited January 2006
    The only Davis version that I have is the one with the first Great Quintet. I believe it's off of "Cookin' with the Miles Davis Quintet".

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