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The Classical Music Thread

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    the Togfatherthe Togfather Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    I am necro-posting because I just saw a reeses peanut butter cups commercial that was set to The Planets. Jupiter, specifically.

    anyway, I was already here and it made me remember this thread...

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    3lwap03lwap0 Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    String Quartet in C-sharp minor, Op. 131

    I was watching Band of Brothers, and heard this. It's awesome.

    3lwap0 on
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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    http://kuatfm.org/classical.cfm

    24/7 classical music. Even better than CBC Radio 2 in that regard. Free internet stream.

    It's awesome.

    saggio on
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    the Togfatherthe Togfather Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Wow, it looks like you can look ahead to see what they're going to play, they have the whole month of May mapped out. I've gotta keep my eyes on this, would be a great way to catch stuff I've been meaning to listen to.

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    setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    http://www.imslp.org/wiki/Main_Page

    Massive amounts of sheet music. They have a lot of really esoteric stuff as well, like the Busoni Piano Concerto and works by Charles Alkan.

    setrajonas on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    setrajonas wrote: »
    http://www.imslp.org/wiki/Main_Page

    Massive amounts of sheet music. They have a lot of really esoteric stuff as well, like the Busoni Piano Concerto and works by Charles Alkan.

    <3

    Hamju on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Oh god, the Scriabin Op. 74 No. 2 prelude. I need some tissues.


    And lube.

    Elendil on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Elendil wrote: »
    Oh god, the Scriabin Op. 74 No. 2 prelude. I need some tissues.


    And lube.
    Oh god, I have to learn this.

    Have to.

    Just playing through the tolling, desolate left hand has me overjoyed. So fucking cool. The right hand looks like a bitch and a half, but fuck me...

    Elendil on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    OH MY GOD OH MY GOD OH MY GOD THE MET'S DOING TRISTAN THIS YEAR THE MET'S DOING TRISTAN THIS YEAR OH MY GOD OH MY SWEET NORSE GOD

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    AND DIE WALKURE OH JESUS OH JESUS OH JESUS OH JAAAAAAAYSES

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Tell me when they've got Wozzeck.

    Elendil on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Elendil wrote: »
    Tell me when they've got Wozzeck.

    They're doing Peter Grimes.

    You seem like you might be a Britten fan.

    And I might have to go see Norma just because it's got my favorite aria.

    But, seriously, this is a fucking AMAZING season.

    Aida, La Bohem, Carmen, La Clemenza di Tito, Macbeth, Norma, Le Nozze di Figaro, Il Barbiere di Siviglia, Otello, Peter Grimes, Romeo e Juliette Satyagraha, Tristan, Die Walkure.

    Just.....wow

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    I've actually never heard any Britten.

    Elendil on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    I'd really like to see La Boheme sometime. I performed in one scene of it for my school's opera diploma recital. It was a lot of fun.

    Hamju on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    That actually sounds pretty good on an accordion.

    Elendil on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Elendil wrote: »
    That actually sounds pretty good on an accordion.

    I was very surprised. Only in the runs does it really stand out that it's an accordion.

    Hamju on
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    setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Sigh, I still have yet to see a live performance of an opera. In the meanwhile, I clutch to my recording of the Marriage of Figaro.

    setrajonas on
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    AWinnerIsYouAWinnerIsYou Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Maybe this doesn't fall into classical music proper, but a good (or terrifying) story nonetheless.

    I live near Cleveland so the Cleveland Orchestra is just a car ride away. I make sure never to take for granted living so close to one of , if not the, best orchestras on Earth. Anyways, I'm really into the contemporary scene. Big, subscription concert orchestras rarely do super modern stuff, but a few times a season we may get lucky. Although not "super modern," I was really excited to see that they were playing the Berg Chamber Concerto with Mitsuko Uchida and Bill Preucil as the soloists.

    So I gathered my friends and attended the concert. They also played Brahms 2.
    Anyways, Welser-Most was conducting, which is a rarity as he spends a majority of his time in Vienna due to tax issues. (One of the several reasons why Cleveland is on the decline... but I digress)
    They begin the Berg. The first two movements are okay, the soloists were amazing. And then they got to the third movement. Never in my life have I seen any group stop mid-performance. Not professional groups, not even seventh grade band. But during the third movement of the Berg, Welser-Most screwed up. And stopped. The Cleveland Orchestra. Not once. Twice. YIKES. I was so uncomfortable.

    The Cleveland Plain-Dealer music critic wrote a pretty scathing review of the concert. He blamed Welser-Most for the whole fiasco.
    Here's the article:
    CLASSICAL MUSIC
    Welser-MÖst tries it again, twice, after concerto stops orchestra in its tracks
    Saturday, May 26, 2007
    Donald Rosenberg
    Plain Dealer Music Critic

    Anyone who has ever played an instrument or sung knows the uncomfortable feeling that creeps in when things don't quite go as the composer planned.

    Listeners aren't always aware of these discrepancies, but the Cleveland Orchestra's audience Thursday at Severance Hall was abuzz at intermission about the two interruptions during the last movement of Alban Berg's Chamber Concerto for Piano, Violin and 13 Wind Instruments.

    The piece was moving along when everything suddenly collapsed and music director Franz Welser-MÖst uttered, "Sorry." He took the ensemble back a bunch of bars and tried again, to no better effect.

    "You see how difficult this is," the conductor said to the audience. "It worked this morning."

    Finally, Welser-MÖst got his meters straight, and the music proceeded to its inevitable, touching end. One suspects the weekend's remaining performances will go more smoothly.

    Berg's score deserves the attention. It is a masterpiece of construction and emotional content, albeit one of the most intricate works in the repertoire. The composer flirts with 12-tone techniques as he incorporates hidden codes and the musical names of his close Viennese colleagues Schoenberg and Webern into the fabric.

    The opening theme and variations introduce the primary motives and develop them. The second movement is a palindrome that also serves as an impassioned memorial to Schoenberg's first wife, Mathilde. Material from the first and second movements are combined in the finale, whose tricky textures and rhythms -- the cause of Thursday's distress -- are major challenges.

    Despite the discomfort, the performance wasn't an outright disaster, though it also wasn't very good. Mitsuko Uchida's forceful, alert pianism and concertmaster William Preucil's silken violin solos gave vibrant voice to Berg's profusion of ideas even when the interplay of solo instruments and fine winds failed to achieve coherence or urgency. Welser-MÖst's helpful comments before the performance about the work's "meaning" often didn't transfer to the music-making itself.

    After the vague harmonies and complexities of Berg, Brahms' Symphony No. 2 seemed like an old friend encountered on a warm spring day. This is the brightest of the composer's four symphonies, full of sweetness, eloquence and energy, with only a few clouds hovering.

    Welser-MÖst connected vibrantly with the first movement's lyrical activity and syncopated figures, and he joined the players in a noble reading of the slow movement, which had superb horn, bassoon, oboe and flute contributions. At such moments, the orchestra's distinguished Brahms tradition could be richly discerned.

    But the performance began to lose focus in the third movement, which was short of charm and pointed articulation. The finale's mounting excitement wasn't achieved, its activity sounding generic and the trombone lines too cautiously gauged.

    The program repeats at 8 tonight and 3 p.m. Sunday.

    To reach this Plain Dealer reporter:

    drosenberg@plaind.com, 216-999-4269

    Definitely a bizarre evening. Too bad such a great piece couldn't go unscathed.

    AWinnerIsYou on
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    Not SarastroNot Sarastro __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2007
    setrajonas wrote: »
    Sigh, I still have yet to see a live performance of an opera. In the meanwhile, I clutch to my recording of the Marriage of Figaro.

    You could get some other recordings of other operas :P

    Not Sarastro on
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    ScikarScikar Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Having heard Elgar's Nimrod from Enigma Variations, I'd quite like to get hold of the full work. Looking on Amazon though, there's a lot of different recordings. Any recommendations?

    Scikar on
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    setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Hamju wrote: »
    I'd really like to see La Boheme sometime. I performed in one scene of it for my school's opera diploma recital. It was a lot of fun.

    I'm actually seeing it this Tuesday.

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    AWinnerIsYouAWinnerIsYou Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Scikar wrote: »
    Having heard Elgar's Nimrod from Enigma Variations, I'd quite like to get hold of the full work. Looking on Amazon though, there's a lot of different recordings. Any recommendations?

    Any recording by Cleveland, Wiener (Vienna) Philharmonic, New York Phil, Chicago, St. Louis or Boston is going to be good quality. There's an orchestra in California, I always forget which one, that's good also, maybe San Fran? Cincinnati is surprisingly good as well. So is whatever group Michael Tilson Thomas is conducting. If you can find a recording by any of those, you'll be set.

    AWinnerIsYou on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Podly wrote: »
    Hamju wrote: »
    I'd really like to see La Boheme sometime. I performed in one scene of it for my school's opera diploma recital. It was a lot of fun.

    I'm actually seeing it this Tuesday.

    I got to be Alcindoro (the sugar-daddy).

    Hamju on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Scikar wrote: »
    Having heard Elgar's Nimrod from Enigma Variations, I'd quite like to get hold of the full work. Looking on Amazon though, there's a lot of different recordings. Any recommendations?

    There's one that also comes with an amazing recording of The Planets that is very good. I'll see if I can dig it up later.

    Hamju on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Maybe this doesn't fall into classical music proper, but a good (or terrifying) story nonetheless.

    I live near Cleveland so the Cleveland Orchestra is just a car ride away. I make sure never to take for granted living so close to one of , if not the, best orchestras on Earth. Anyways, I'm really into the contemporary scene. Big, subscription concert orchestras rarely do super modern stuff, but a few times a season we may get lucky. Although not "super modern," I was really excited to see that they were playing the Berg Chamber Concerto with Mitsuko Uchida and Bill Preucil as the soloists.

    So I gathered my friends and attended the concert. They also played Brahms 2.
    Anyways, Welser-Most was conducting, which is a rarity as he spends a majority of his time in Vienna due to tax issues. (One of the several reasons why Cleveland is on the decline... but I digress)
    They begin the Berg. The first two movements are okay, the soloists were amazing. And then they got to the third movement. Never in my life have I seen any group stop mid-performance. Not professional groups, not even seventh grade band. But during the third movement of the Berg, Welser-Most screwed up. And stopped. The Cleveland Orchestra. Not once. Twice. YIKES. I was so uncomfortable.

    The Cleveland Plain-Dealer music critic wrote a pretty scathing review of the concert. He blamed Welser-Most for the whole fiasco.
    Here's the article:
    CLASSICAL MUSIC
    Welser-MÖst tries it again, twice, after concerto stops orchestra in its tracks
    Saturday, May 26, 2007
    Donald Rosenberg
    Plain Dealer Music Critic

    Anyone who has ever played an instrument or sung knows the uncomfortable feeling that creeps in when things don't quite go as the composer planned.

    Listeners aren't always aware of these discrepancies, but the Cleveland Orchestra's audience Thursday at Severance Hall was abuzz at intermission about the two interruptions during the last movement of Alban Berg's Chamber Concerto for Piano, Violin and 13 Wind Instruments.

    The piece was moving along when everything suddenly collapsed and music director Franz Welser-MÖst uttered, "Sorry." He took the ensemble back a bunch of bars and tried again, to no better effect.

    "You see how difficult this is," the conductor said to the audience. "It worked this morning."

    Finally, Welser-MÖst got his meters straight, and the music proceeded to its inevitable, touching end. One suspects the weekend's remaining performances will go more smoothly.

    Berg's score deserves the attention. It is a masterpiece of construction and emotional content, albeit one of the most intricate works in the repertoire. The composer flirts with 12-tone techniques as he incorporates hidden codes and the musical names of his close Viennese colleagues Schoenberg and Webern into the fabric.

    The opening theme and variations introduce the primary motives and develop them. The second movement is a palindrome that also serves as an impassioned memorial to Schoenberg's first wife, Mathilde. Material from the first and second movements are combined in the finale, whose tricky textures and rhythms -- the cause of Thursday's distress -- are major challenges.

    Despite the discomfort, the performance wasn't an outright disaster, though it also wasn't very good. Mitsuko Uchida's forceful, alert pianism and concertmaster William Preucil's silken violin solos gave vibrant voice to Berg's profusion of ideas even when the interplay of solo instruments and fine winds failed to achieve coherence or urgency. Welser-MÖst's helpful comments before the performance about the work's "meaning" often didn't transfer to the music-making itself.

    After the vague harmonies and complexities of Berg, Brahms' Symphony No. 2 seemed like an old friend encountered on a warm spring day. This is the brightest of the composer's four symphonies, full of sweetness, eloquence and energy, with only a few clouds hovering.

    Welser-MÖst connected vibrantly with the first movement's lyrical activity and syncopated figures, and he joined the players in a noble reading of the slow movement, which had superb horn, bassoon, oboe and flute contributions. At such moments, the orchestra's distinguished Brahms tradition could be richly discerned.

    But the performance began to lose focus in the third movement, which was short of charm and pointed articulation. The finale's mounting excitement wasn't achieved, its activity sounding generic and the trombone lines too cautiously gauged.

    The program repeats at 8 tonight and 3 p.m. Sunday.

    To reach this Plain Dealer reporter:

    drosenberg@plaind.com, 216-999-4269

    Definitely a bizarre evening. Too bad such a great piece couldn't go unscathed.

    I'd hate to bump this with my third post in a row, but I've just gotta say something. On Sunday I sang in the Grand River Baroque Festival in Ontario in a performance of Handel's "Israel in Egypt". I sang with a pick-up group-for-hire called the Aradia ensemble and had an absolute blast. Actually, now I'm officially a professional musician... woo hoo! Anywho, it was a wonderful (albeit hot and uncomfortable) performance, except for one number.

    The conductor had been having some problems with the soprano soloist (she didn't write in bar-numbers into the score even though he told her to, she was making some dumb mistakes, etc.) and in the soprano duet she actually made a huge mistake. She came in a beat early, and the second soprano followed her. It sounded awful and she just refused to fix it. Either she wasn't paying attention and didn't even know she was off, or she thought that the orchestra should change for her. The conductor was furious and was trying to correct them (mouthing the words and, of all things, bar numbers), but it didn't work. He had to stop, mumbled something spiteful about "..concert date..." (he's an angry Irishman) and started over. The second go-through was good, but a little uneasy. The rest of the program was awesome.

    Hamju on
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    setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Ah, for the days of music ensembles. Back when I was in the philadelphia youth orchestra, in one concert the first violins came in a beat early right at the beginning of the last movement of Beethoven's 8th. That was probably the most discordant Beethoven the audience will ever hear.

    Also, hooray for not playing in any orchestra for a year (the wonders of conflicting class times). Fortunately, I'm finally auditioning for college orchestra this fall.

    setrajonas on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Ha, actually there was one other major flub that night. Our conductor decided to have the intermission not right between the first and second parts, but after the bass duet which was a few choruses later (actually closer to the middle of the work). Well, after the intermission we started and the first chord from the orchestra sounded TERRIBLE. Immediately I looked over and saw two of the violinists have disgusted and confused looks on their faces. They soon realized they were actually playing the wrong section, turned to the right one and it went smoothly from there.

    Hamju on
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    the Togfatherthe Togfather Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Hamju wrote: »
    Scikar wrote: »
    Having heard Elgar's Nimrod from Enigma Variations, I'd quite like to get hold of the full work. Looking on Amazon though, there's a lot of different recordings. Any recommendations?

    There's one that also comes with an amazing recording of The Planets that is very good. I'll see if I can dig it up later.

    I've been meaning to get a good (ie. not free) recording of The Planets...I await your response.

    the Togfather on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Hamju wrote: »
    Scikar wrote: »
    Having heard Elgar's Nimrod from Enigma Variations, I'd quite like to get hold of the full work. Looking on Amazon though, there's a lot of different recordings. Any recommendations?

    There's one that also comes with an amazing recording of The Planets that is very good. I'll see if I can dig it up later.

    I've been meaning to get a good (ie. not free) recording of The Planets...I await your response.

    Ha! Oh shit I completely forgot about this. The version with Enigma Variations on it is on Deutsche Grammophon. The Planets is by William Steinberg with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. The Enigma Variations is by E. Jochum and the London Symphony Orchestra.

    I really love two recordings of The Planets. That one and one done by Zubin Mehta with the LAPO. That CD also has a recording of John Williams' Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Star Wars.

    Hamju on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    seeing Faust tonight

    Pretty pumped

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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    I need to get into Opera and one idea I have for my wife's birthday is getting her some opera DVDs (she's in voice performance and needs to watch/listen to more operas). Any suggestions of regularly available good performances?

    Hamju on
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    ErlkingErlking Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Hamju wrote: »
    I need to get into Opera and one idea I have for my wife's birthday is getting her some opera DVDs (she's in voice performance and needs to watch/listen to more operas). Any suggestions of regularly available good performances?

    The Glyndebourne Festival Opera consistently puts out pretty great DVDs of their performances. Their 2004 Gianni Schicchi is particularly good - brilliantly acted and sung. I think they have a deal where you can get a boxed set of 6 of their opera dvds for a discount.

    For something with more in the way of film sensibilities, you can't go wrong with Ingmar Bergman's Magic Flute. It's a Swedish translation, yes, but the man is one of the most important filmmakers of the 20th century anyway, and it has Hakan Hagegard as Papageno.

    For something a bit more modern, I'd check out a production of Peter Grimes. I like the one with Philip Langridge, but a lot of people seem to prefer the one with Jon Vickers. If you check out the Langridge one, you may want to print a libretto off the internet as it doesn't have subtitles and Britten tends to make English hard to understand.

    I also like the production of Oedipus Rex with Philip Langridge, Jessye Norman, and Bryn Terfel. The singing is obviously amazing, and the staging and costumes are pure spectacle.

    Erlking on
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    HamjuHamju Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    That's awesome, thanks a lot.

    Hamju on
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    setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    Is anyone watching the Mostly Mozart festival on TV? It's on PBS.

    setrajonas on
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    the Togfatherthe Togfather Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    setrajonas wrote: »
    Is anyone watching the Mostly Mozart festival on TV? It's on PBS.

    Hmmm, wonder if it's on PBS HD...they usually re-run stuff like this alot, right? I'll look for it...

    the Togfather on
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    setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    It was pretty interesting. They had Emmanuel Ax doing a couple of the piano concerti and also one of the sonatas for two pianos with his wife. Along with it all they had some sort of abstract dancing troupe which was not as lame as I thought it would be.

    setrajonas on
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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited August 2007
    setrajonas wrote: »
    Is anyone watching the Mostly Mozart festival on TV? It's on PBS.
    I'm going to one of the rehearsals of the requiem on Friday. I've been to a couple of the events. One was AMAZING, the other was meh.

    I've been really into post-1950 classical lately. Mostly Penderecki and Glass's minimalism. I'd like to find more minimalism to listen to.

    YosemiteSam on
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