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The Classical Music Thread

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited March 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    Seriously - the man taught Beethoven!

    Didn't that not work out so well? :wink:

    I haven't heard any Haydn, really. I've severly neglected most pre-Beethoven stuff. I intend to get to it, but I'm too enamored with the 20th century at the moment.

    Elendil on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited March 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    Not a big bartok guy. Seems like you could find a better show. Maybe head up yto NY for the Met, or the philharmonic. I definitely think you might like this

    That is tempting, but New York's a bit far. I'm also wondering if I can make the last concert of the season. Beethoven 9 FTW.

    Also, I'm getting to fucking love Gyorgy Ligeti. He's another to add to the pile of composers that I need to hear more of.

    Elendil on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited March 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    Not a big bartok guy. Seems like you could find a better show. Maybe head up yto NY for the Met, or the philharmonic. I definitely think you might like this

    That is tempting, but New York's a bit far. I'm also wondering if I can make the last concert of the season. Beethoven 9 FTW.

    Also, I'm getting to fucking love Gyorgy Ligeti. He's another to add to the pile of composers that I need to hear more of.

    With you being a pretty big classical fan, I urge you to wait for your 9th and plan an overnight trip to Tanglewood in Massachusetts. The BSO finishes their summer concerts at Tanglewood each year with the 9th, and the two times I've been it has been absolutley phenomenal. Last August, I was rendered speechless.

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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Yay for necroposting!

    Does anybody know where I might find a complete copy of Copland's Twelve Poems of Emily Dickinson? Classiccat only has #5, which I enjoy.

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    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Can anyone recommend some really rhythmically interesting composers (along the lines of Stravinsky or Bartók)?
    David Holsinger, Liturgical Dances. It's newer but the meter is so insane. like a 12/8 shift every 4 measures. Theres some 3/4+4/4 combined meter also.

    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Can anyone recommend some really rhythmically interesting composers (along the lines of Stravinsky or Bartók)?
    David Holsinger, Liturgical Dances. It's newer but the meter is so insane. like a 12/8 shift every 4 measures. Theres some 3/4+4/4 combined meter also.

    Sounds interesting. Haven't heard of him before.

    Also, <3 this thread.

    Elendil on
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    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    edited August 2018
    -

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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    He'll be running the West Virginia All State Band this year if you want to see him in person. I think I'm going to ask for his autograph but not make it be awkard. Is this possible?
    Tell him it's a legal document or something. :P

    stilist on
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    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    John Williams is the new classical. Come 200 years from now he wiil be the new king of symphony.

    No, because people will, eventually, realize he just is "inspired by" Holst's The Planets for about every single score he ever did. See Mars, Bringer of War.

    Glad someone brought this up. I don't think theres a piece of classical music he hasn't stolen from.

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    ShintoShinto __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2006
    Mukaikubo wrote:
    John Williams is the new classical. Come 200 years from now he wiil be the new king of symphony.

    No, because people will, eventually, realize he just is "inspired by" Holst's The Planets for about every single score he ever did. See Mars, Bringer of War.

    Glad someone brought this up. I don't think theres a piece of classical music he hasn't stolen from.

    I've heard the same about Picasso though.

    History hasn't treated him too harshly.

    Shinto on
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    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Are you making a point?
    Listen to Mars and then John William's work. He takes the central theme from Mars, and plays it.
    He's a good composer for what he does, but hes not that original.
    To be fair, classical music has been around so long that repetition was bound to happen.

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    ShintoShinto __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2006
    Are you making a point?

    Yeah, the point that Williams' work being derrivative won't necessarily effect his historical standing.

    Shinto on
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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Shinto wrote:
    Are you making a point?

    Yeah, the point that Williams' work being derrivative won't necessarily effect his historical standing.

    ...But it does affect his credibility and perceived originality. There is nothing wrong with stealing in composition: Stravinsky has a famous quote to that effect. However, ripping an entire motif and motif-development from someone who composed a masterpiece less than a hundred years before you - that's just lame, and doesn't do anything to improve your stature in the musical community.

    For what it's worth, his film scores are all pretty standard, cookie-cutter fares. I think people seriously overestimate his ability and reputation.

    Also: I've been listening to Sibelius' complete Symphonic cycle, and it's blowing my mind.

    saggio on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Also: I've been listening to Sibelius' complete Symphonic cycle, and it's blowing my mind.

    Who's conducting? I saw the sixth live about a month ago under Osmo Vanska. It was incredible.

    Elendil on
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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Also: I've been listening to Sibelius' complete Symphonic cycle, and it's blowing my mind.

    Who's conducting? I saw the sixth live about a month ago under Osmo Vanska. It was incredible.

    That's who is conducting on my recordings. He's conducting the Lahti Symphony Orchestra - I had never heard of them until I bought this Sibelius cycle.

    saggio on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Also: I've been listening to Sibelius' complete Symphonic cycle, and it's blowing my mind.

    Who's conducting? I saw the sixth live about a month ago under Osmo Vanska. It was incredible.

    That's who is conducting on my recordings. He's conducting the Lahti Symphony Orchestra - I had never heard of them until I bought this Sibelius cycle.

    That must be an awesome set. He's one of the highly regarded Sibelius conductors--that's why I jumped at the chance to see the performance.

    Elendil on
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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Also: I've been listening to Sibelius' complete Symphonic cycle, and it's blowing my mind.

    Who's conducting? I saw the sixth live about a month ago under Osmo Vanska. It was incredible.

    That's who is conducting on my recordings. He's conducting the Lahti Symphony Orchestra - I had never heard of them until I bought this Sibelius cycle.

    That must be an awesome set. He's one of the highly regarded Sibelius conductors--that's why I jumped at the chance to see the performance.

    It's absolutely wonderful. The last movement of the Fifth totally blows me away.

    saggio on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Also: I've been listening to Sibelius' complete Symphonic cycle, and it's blowing my mind.

    Who's conducting? I saw the sixth live about a month ago under Osmo Vanska. It was incredible.

    That's who is conducting on my recordings. He's conducting the Lahti Symphony Orchestra - I had never heard of them until I bought this Sibelius cycle.

    That must be an awesome set. He's one of the highly regarded Sibelius conductors--that's why I jumped at the chance to see the performance.

    It's absolutely wonderful. The last movement of the Fifth totally blows me away.

    For some reason I have a bizarre way with Sibelius. I'll get on a real kick for a while and then listen to basically nothing. I continually underrate him.

    His music is consistently amazing. The only thing I can't really get into is his seventh, which kind of pains me, since it's supposed to be his masterpiece.

    Isn't the slow movement of the third gorgeous? I haven't listened to him much since the concert...maybe I should start the cycle over. :wink:

    Edit: Oh, I have the Bernstein cycle, if you were wondering. It's pretty good. I'm tempted to pick up the Vanska eventually to supplement it.

    Edit: Edit: I suppose "slow" isn't an accurate description of the second movement of the third. Close enough. :wink:

    Elendil on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    I think the Mahler's Sixth may have finished the job that Das Lied von der Erde started.

    Ho-ly shit.

    Elendil on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    I think the Mahler's Sixth may have finished the job that Das Lied von der Erde started.

    Ho-ly shit.

    Told you so. :wink:

    The Fifth, Sixth, Second, and Eighth symphonies are absolutely amazing.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    I think the Mahler's Sixth may have finished the job that Das Lied von der Erde started.

    Ho-ly shit.

    Told you so. :wink:

    The Fifth, Sixth, Second, and Eighth symphonies are absolutely amazing.

    The final movement, like Der Abschied from DLvdE, has that quality of being extremely long and not sounding so, compared to the symphonies--5 and 9-- that I didn't like. There, a 15 minute movement will sound interminable.

    The sixth manages to effortlessy maintain momentum for the full duration of the symphony. That's goddamn impressive. I'd love to see this one live.

    It's not quite the revelation Das Lied was, but it's amazing nonetheless.

    Edit: What is your preferred order of the inner movements? I've been listening to the andante before the scherzo (despite the recording being in the opposite order).

    Elendil on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    I think the Mahler's Sixth may have finished the job that Das Lied von der Erde started.

    Ho-ly shit.

    Told you so. :wink:

    The Fifth, Sixth, Second, and Eighth symphonies are absolutely amazing.

    The final movement, like Der Abschied from DLvdE, has that quality of being extremely long and not sounding so, compared to the symphonies--5 and 9-- that I didn't like. There, a 15 minute movement will sound interminable.

    The sixth manages to effortlessy maintain momentum for the full duration of the symphony. That's goddamn impressive. I'd love to see this one live.

    It's not quite the revelation Das Lied was, but it's amazing nonetheless.

    I wish I could like Das Lied more. I just can't get into Lieder for some reason.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    I wish I could like Das Lied more. I just can't get into Lieder for some reason.

    I don't get that. Is it lieder in general, or specific to Mahler?

    Honestly, just remembering parts of Der Abschied will sometimes make me tear up a bit.

    Edit: See above edit.

    Edit: Edit: I guess we're just at some kind of Tristan-ian impasse. :wink:

    Elendil on
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    EternalEternal Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Okay I'm no classical expert but I have to post in this thread because I don't see Shostakovich mentioned at all. The Borodin String Quartet performed some of his work that has me thinking about violins in erotic and dangerous new ways.

    Eternal on
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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Eternal wrote:
    Okay I'm no classical expert but I have to post in this thread because I don't see Shostakovich mentioned at all. The Borodin String Quartet performed some of his work that has me thinking about violins in erotic and dangerous new ways.
    Let me speak from experience here: violin necks make horrible dildos.

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    EternalEternal Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    stilist wrote:
    Eternal wrote:
    Okay I'm no classical expert but I have to post in this thread because I don't see Shostakovich mentioned at all. The Borodin String Quartet performed some of his work that has me thinking about violins in erotic and dangerous new ways.
    Let me speak from experience here: violin necks make horrible dildos.

    Who said I would use the neck

    Eternal on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Eternal wrote:
    stilist wrote:
    Eternal wrote:
    Okay I'm no classical expert but I have to post in this thread because I don't see Shostakovich mentioned at all. The Borodin String Quartet performed some of his work that has me thinking about violins in erotic and dangerous new ways.
    Let me speak from experience here: violin necks make horrible dildos.

    Who said I would use the neck

    hawt

    Elendil on
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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Eternal wrote:
    Okay I'm no classical expert but I have to post in this thread because I don't see Shostakovich mentioned at all. The Borodin String Quartet performed some of his work that has me thinking about violins in erotic and dangerous new ways.

    It's all about his second Piano Concerto. The orchestra I was playing with played it last season, and let me tell you, it's some of the most insane, grotesque and totally awesome stuff you'll ever listen to. A significant portion of the finale is in 7/8! I loves me some post-Five Russian music.

    saggio on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Eternal wrote:
    Okay I'm no classical expert but I have to post in this thread because I don't see Shostakovich mentioned at all. The Borodin String Quartet performed some of his work that has me thinking about violins in erotic and dangerous new ways.

    It's all about his second Piano Concerto. The orchestra I was playing with played it last season, and let me tell you, it's some of the most insane, grotesque and totally awesome stuff you'll ever listen to.

    :o

    If it's anything like the first cello concerto, you've just piqued my interest in a huge way.

    Elendil on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    I have basically not stopped listening to the Mahler 6 in about three days.

    Elendil on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    I have basically not stopped listening to the Mahler 6 in about three days.

    I knew it would work!

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    I have basically not stopped listening to the Mahler 6 in about three days.

    I knew it would work!

    I especially love the bit in the finale where it builds up into a big, standard Mahlerian heroic climax. Then, just as it's about to finish--it goes reeling back into violence. Amazing.

    Elendil on
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    AmphetamineAmphetamine Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    I have basically not stopped listening to the Mahler 6 in about three days.

    I knew it would work!

    I especially love the bit in the finale where it builds up into a big, standard Mahlerian heroic climax. Then, just as it's about to finish--it goes reeling back into violence. Amazing.
    Mother of fuck I meant to pick this up today because of all the hype you guys were giving it and forgot about it while I was at the library- what conductor's version is best?

    Amphetamine on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    I have basically not stopped listening to the Mahler 6 in about three days.

    I knew it would work!

    I especially love the bit in the finale where it builds up into a big, standard Mahlerian heroic climax. Then, just as it's about to finish--it goes reeling back into violence. Amazing.
    Mother of fuck I meant to pick this up today because of all the hype you guys were giving it and forgot about it while I was at the library- what conductor's version is best?

    I'm a big fan of Bernie's work when it comes to Mahler. He's the only reason we're even listening to Mahler today.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    I have basically not stopped listening to the Mahler 6 in about three days.

    I knew it would work!

    I especially love the bit in the finale where it builds up into a big, standard Mahlerian heroic climax. Then, just as it's about to finish--it goes reeling back into violence. Amazing.
    Mother of fuck I meant to pick this up today because of all the hype you guys were giving it and forgot about it while I was at the library- what conductor's version is best?

    I only have the Pierre Boulez recording, but it is fantastic. Lots of energy and clarity.

    Elendil on
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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Eternal wrote:
    Okay I'm no classical expert but I have to post in this thread because I don't see Shostakovich mentioned at all. The Borodin String Quartet performed some of his work that has me thinking about violins in erotic and dangerous new ways.

    It's all about his second Piano Concerto. The orchestra I was playing with played it last season, and let me tell you, it's some of the most insane, grotesque and totally awesome stuff you'll ever listen to.

    :o

    If it's anything like the first cello concerto, you've just piqued my interest in a huge way.

    It's totally awesome. The second movement, though, that's beauty Chopin himself couldn't even match. The first movement is fairly standard fare, as far as Shostakovich can be called standard. Interestingly, he wrote the piece as a birthday gift for his son, Max.

    saggio on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Eternal wrote:
    Okay I'm no classical expert but I have to post in this thread because I don't see Shostakovich mentioned at all. The Borodin String Quartet performed some of his work that has me thinking about violins in erotic and dangerous new ways.

    It's all about his second Piano Concerto. The orchestra I was playing with played it last season, and let me tell you, it's some of the most insane, grotesque and totally awesome stuff you'll ever listen to.

    :o

    If it's anything like the first cello concerto, you've just piqued my interest in a huge way.

    It's totally awesome. The second movement, though, that's beauty Chopin himself couldn't even match. The first movement is fairly standard fare, as far as Shostakovich can be called standard. Interestingly, he wrote the piece as a birthday gift for his son, Max.

    Hm. I've been meaning to pick up more Shostakovich* for a while. I imagine it would be a logical next step.

    *I've been meaning to pick up a lot of things.

    Elendil on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    I think I've burned out on Mahler. Now I'm back into Sibelius. And it is glorious.

    I've also decided to order Berg's Wozzeck tonight.

    Elendil on
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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    Guuuuustaavvv.... HOLST!

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    Abba ZabaothAbba Zabaoth Registered User regular
    edited June 2006
    stilist wrote:
    Guuuuustaavvv.... HOLST!

    Represent.

    I've been getting into Minimalism a lot lately. Philip Glass' solo piano works are just excellent simplicity.

    Abba Zabaoth on
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