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The Classical Music Thread

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    The_Indigo_ApocalypseThe_Indigo_Apocalypse Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Erlking wrote:
    setrajonas wrote:
    I've been very into Bartok and Hindemith lately.
    Oh God yes.

    I hear all the time that Hindemith is criticized for being too mechanical and unemotional, but that's total BS. If you're not moved by the third movement of his sonata for clarinet and piano, you just may be a robot.

    HINDEMITH!!! Unemotional?! BAH!

    I went to a recital recently and Listened to a piece by ravel for Violin and Cello, but I can't qute remember what it was, and I don't have the program on hand right now. I remember I loved the ending though--had a ton of harmonics in it. Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

    Listening to Mozart's Requiem right now, omg <3. :cry:

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    setrajonas wrote:
    What's this? I read through this entire thread and there's exactly one mention of Brahms? He's one of my favorites, what with pieces like:

    Symphony 2/4
    Requiem
    Piano Concerto no. 2
    Violin Concerto
    All of his chamber pieces

    I've been very into Bartok and Hindemith lately. My youth orchestra just did the Hindemith Symphonic Metamorphoses last year, which was excellent. Bartok's 3rd String Quartet is possibly one of my favorite quartets ever.
    Brahms is amazing. The beginning of his first sonata for clarinet and piano is pretty much perfect.

    Actually, I've never listened past the beginning.

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    stiliststilist Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Samuel Sebastian Wesley = organ genius

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    setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Here's some other stuff I think is pretty awesome (I'll try and avoid what others have already put down):

    JS Bach: Six Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin
    Prokofiev: symphonies 1 and 5, piano concerti 1-3,5 Violin Sonata no. 1 (I'm actually playing this one right now, it's an incredible piece)
    Ravel: Jeux d'eau (I've played it, it's incredible), Gaspard de la Nuit (insanity)
    Bartok: Concerto for Orchestra, Music for Strings Percussion and Celesta, any of the string quartets, the Miraculous Mandarin
    Schubert: String Quintet in C
    Beethoven: String Quartet in C# minor Op.131, Symphony 8, the Hammerklavier and Appassionata piano sonatas
    Schoenburg: Verklarte Nacht

    @Indigo: You might be thinking about the sonata for violin and cello. I think Ravel did something like that.

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    The_Indigo_ApocalypseThe_Indigo_Apocalypse Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    I believe you are correct Setrajonas.

    And the Six Sonatas and Partitas you mentioned for Solo Violin are indeed AMAZING! ^_^!

    Although, memorizing them is a BITCH! >.<

    That's why I hated college auditions (well, that and having to memorize the Beethoven as well).


    ...I don't like Hilary Hahn's (spelling? lol) rendition of the Six Sonatas and Partitas though. She just sounds so stiff and unemotional.

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    setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    I haven't heard Hahn's rendition: I have both Milstein and Szeryng though, and I love both.

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    The_Indigo_ApocalypseThe_Indigo_Apocalypse Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Seriously, don't bother listening to her rendition, you'll only be dissapointed.

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    ErlkingErlking Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    So, let's talk Benjamin Britten.

    I'm sort of just getting into him. I started with his Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and Strings, which is just fucking cool. Stayed in my playlist for about two months. Then I moved on to his arrangement of the Beggar's Opera, which was also great. Then I checked out the Turn of the Screw, which is getting a bit weirder, but still fairly well identifiable as being by the same person...

    ...and then I check out A Midsummer Night's Dream and we're in borderline Schoenberg territory. What's the deal?

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Oh man.

    Beethoven's 13th Quartet for the mother fucking win.

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    The_Indigo_ApocalypseThe_Indigo_Apocalypse Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    Oh man.

    Beethoven's 13th Quartet for the mother fucking win.

    :^: Definitely.

    But, listen to Ravel's string quartet in F major.

    And Debussy's quartet in g minor.

    God, there are just wayyyyy too many great quartets out there. :D

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    I wonder if the Augers of Spring section of the Rite will ever leave my brain.

    It won't stop playing.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Wow. Debussy's Nocturnes for orchestra are fantastic.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Wow. Debussy's Nocturnes for orchestra are fantastic.

    Hehe.


    I just made a thread about Debussy in SE.


    It is failing.


    Miserably.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    Wow. Debussy's Nocturnes for orchestra are fantastic.

    Hehe.


    I just made a thread about Debussy in SE.


    It is failing.


    Miserably.

    Clair de Lune doesn't do much for me, either.

    Elendil on
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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    Wow. Debussy's Nocturnes for orchestra are fantastic.

    Hehe.


    I just made a thread about Debussy in SE.


    It is failing.


    Miserably.

    Clair de Lune doesn't do much for me, either.

    That's because you have no soul.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    I'm listening to it now. It's okay... just now mind blowing or anything. A bit romantic for my tastes.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    I'm listening to it now. It's okay... just now mind blowing or anything. A bit romantic for my tastes.

    That's what it's supposed to be. I only really love the opening pp part. God, such beautiful notes, so airy, so serene.

    Also,
    Punch wrote:
    Teacher: "And what does ff mean?"
    Pupil (after mature deliberation): "Fump-Fump."


    Ohhhh Punch. You never fail to deliver the goods.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Poldy wrote:
    What an awesome song.

    Sure, it's overdone, but if I were a girl I were an attractive girl I would just carry around a stereo with it playing. People would just give me jewelry.

    More liek Sirenes am i rite?

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    setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    2nd movement of Nocturnes is excellent. La Mer is fantastic though. My youth orchestra got the chance to play both of those (sans last movement of Nocturnes) a couple of years ago, and I had a Debussy phase.

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    InsiderInsider Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Ok I see alot of fancy talk in this thread, and didn't read most of it because I am music illiterate so I didn't stand pretty much any of it.

    Basicaly my whole life I have never understood why people like music at all. I have never owned a CD/tape in my entire life of anything to do with music. Most people think thats wierd, and I guess it is because it seems like music is such a huge part of people's lives. The only time I listen to music is when I'm driving and I usually just hit the scan button over and over because nothing ever sounds 'good' to me. Basically music is just background noise almost to me.

    Anyway recently I began to think I'm not interested in music because I hate the lyrics. I don't want to listen to a person sing about how emo their life is, or how rich they are, or how many ho's they have. So I think to myself, what kind of music has no singing/lyrics? Classical music doesn't right? So I decide I should listen to some classical music. I had no idea what exactly I was looking for, but I just saw this thread and thought maybe some of you can help me.

    I downloaded a couple pieces from the website on the first page, but I don't know whats good/bad/what I should be listening for/what I would like. I don't remember what pieces I listened to but I liked them well enough, they seemed relaxing... maybe too relaxing.

    So some help here would be appreciated. What are some of the 'must' listen to pieces and what do you think I could possibly like? Remember I am music illiterate so I have no idea what '2nd movement', quartets, quintet, etc is so go easy :)

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    KraliasKralias Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    I'll try and list a few of the 'must' have pieces, sorted by composer. I'm not positive if the site you're referring to will have these, or if the performances of them are good, but get whichever you want and get back with the pieces you liked and didn't like. Oh, and don't worry about the musical lingo, even if you don't know what a Violin Concerto means, you should just be able to find a link for 'Violin Concerto No. 5' or something :)

    Ludwig Van Beethoven's String Quartets are absolutely amazing, notably the 13th and 14th String Quartet. The 'Grosse Fugue' by Beethoven is also a String Quartet, and also amazing. A String Quartet is just a musical work for four people with stringed instruments, usually two violins, a cello and a viola. Beethoven's Piano Sonatas are also very good, the popular favourites are the 'Moonlight' Sonata, No. 14, the Pathetique Sonata, No. 8, and the Apassionata Sonata, No. 23. The Hammerklavier Sonata, No. 29, is probably my personal favourite. And of course, Beethoven's Symphonies are excellent as well. Try the 3rd, the 5th, the 6th, the 7th and the 9th. Beethoven also has a Violin Concerto, which is very good.

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is an incredible composer, and chances are good if you pick anything of his it'll probably be enjoyable. I'm not as familar with individual works of his, but try any of the Violin Concertos, the Horn Concertos, the Clarinet Concerto, the String Quartets and String Quintets ( Like a String Quintet, but usually an extra Viola ), or the Piano Concertos. I don't know much about his Serenades or Piano Sonatas, but I'm sure they're good. Also, his 'Requiem' is amazing.

    Johann Sebastian Bach I sadly don't know as much about. I very much love his Violin Sonatas, his Partitas for Violin, the Brandenburg Concertos, the Well-Tempered Clavier, and his Violin Concertos. If you can't find the Well-Tempered Clavier, look for things named 'Prelude and Fugue in <a key>', for example, Prelude and Fugue in A Minor. A letter followed by minor, major or flat is a key. Oh, also, his Cello Suites are quite good.

    Finally, try some Franz Schubert. Try his 20th and 21st Piano Sonatas, his 14th String Quartet, his 8th Symphony, often called the 'Unfinished Symphony', and if you can find it, his String Quintet. He only has one, but it's absolutely amazing.

    EDIT:

    Also, if you want some more Solo Piano music, try Frederic Chopin. He wrote almost nothing but Solo Piano music, and most of it is excellent. Try especially all of his Ballades, Barcarolle and Berceuse, Fantasie Impromptu, any of the Nocturnes, his Second Piano Sonata, and his Preludes and Etudes. Claude Debussy also writes amazing Piano music, and I have yet to hear a piece by him I didn't love, so get it all.

    And if you decide that all of this is 'too relaxing', get Igor Stravinsky's Rite of Spring. :)

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    The_Indigo_ApocalypseThe_Indigo_Apocalypse Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Insider:

    Well it's nice to see some one giving classical music a try! ^_^

    First I'll try to brush you up on some musical lingo:

    Trio- a group of 3 instruments playing together
    Quartet- a group of four playing
    If there are more than 8 players (an ocetet), it generally becomes a Chaber orchestra, which is composed solely of string instruments.

    Symphony- All of the main string instruments (piano pending), with wind and percussion instruments. Thses are usually very large groups and can sometimes include a chorus.

    Opera--this is something I wanted to point out to you because you said you didn't like things with lyrics. Operas might not appeal to you because they do have singing. But they can be entertaining since they're basically a story. Actually, I would give a listen to Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro if I were you, it's a rather entertainig comedy. ^_^

    A movement is a section of a piece and is usually numbered or has name.

    Unacommpanied- there is no piano or orchestra playing with the solo instrument.

    Concerto- A piece written for a specific instrument (the soloist), and they are backed up by a symphony or pianist.

    OKAY, now for pieces to try out:

    One great and well known piece, which is easy to get into and easy to find: Holst's The Planets

    I also read Kralias's post, and everything he recommended is excellent to start off with, so go ahead and take a look at those.

    Tchaikovsky is also an excellent composer, and you would probably recognize some of his pieces. Swan Lake is a very well known piece of his. Although I love Pathetique and his other Symphonies.

    Hyden is also an wonderful compser and it's fairly easy to find his music.

    Brahms is also another great (I especially love his Violin Concerto).

    Well, this post is now ridiculously long, so I'll stop and let other people give you suggestions. ^_~

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Well, first off, Classical music is, indeed awesome. However, it is much more complex (well, most of the time - I'm looking at you, waltzin' Strauss)than the pop music. It may be very hard to understand why it sounds good. Maybe artistic things just aren't for you. Do you like literature or artistic movies? Maybe this stuff just doesn't appeal to you.

    However, you might be right about the lyrics. I always tell people that getting into classical requires finding out what type of classical you like. Classical is a rather modern term for many different styles of music: Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern. Baroque and Romantic are very soaring and large and grandiose, while Classical and Modern are very refined and formal. When I got into classical music, it was through the Romantic composers Beethoven, Wagner, and Tchaikovsky. I hated classical Mozart - I found him so dull and pattern like. Thus, I went to Bach.
    However, I now am loving Haydn and Mozart, finding many parts of Bach's pieces to be a little aimless and pudgy.

    So - what style it for you? I would suggest getting one or two pieces from each style - a symphony/ concerto (large ensemble) and a trio/quartet (small ensemble). Here's what I would recommend, you don't have to pick all of them. Note: I believe that Beethoven was the greatest genius to ever have lived, and anyone in D&D can tell you that I am a total literature dick.

    Baroque:
    Bach - Brandenberg Concerti (or Concertos) (medium sized)
    Bach - Mass in B Minor (Don't worry, there's no homily or anything ;)) (large)
    Vivaldi - Four Seasons (medium, famous)

    Classical:
    Haydn Symphony 95 (large)
    String Quartet no.1 in G major, op. 54. ("op" (Opus number) means the number of the work in the composers catalogue. When you have guys like Beethoven and Haydn who's works were named the same things and have over 100 pieces, it helps to have a numbering system!)
    Mozart - Symphony 41 (Jupiter) (Large)
    Mozart - Requiem (Large, famous)

    Romantic - all Beethoven, because Beethoven is what a great many classical fans build their collection around. He's far and away my favorite composer. There is a famous argument however, about where Beethoven sits stylistically. While he no doubt inspired almost every romantic musician, many say that he was in fact a classical musician. I think that, after his third symphony, he was a romantic composer. His 9th symphony is the most well known piece of classical music (Ode to Joy is part of it) and perhaps the most well known song in all the world. I think that it is the most genius piece of music ever composed.

    Beethoven - Piano Sonata 13 "Pathetique" (small, famous)
    Beethoven - Piano Sonata 14 "Moonlight Sonata (small, very famous)
    Beethoven - Symphony no. 5 (large, very famous)
    Beethoven - Symphony no. 9 (very large, very famous)
    Beethoven - Missa Solemnis (large)
    Beethoven - String Quartet no. 10 "Serioso"
    Beethoven - String Quartet no. 13

    ahh what the hell?

    Mahler - Symphony no. 5 (large)

    Modern: some of this is excruciatingly hard to listen to, but beautiful. I would say try the other styles, and come here only if they don't do anything for you.
    Stravisnky - The Rite of Spring (Large, famous)
    Webern - String Quartet Bagatelle
    Berg - Violin Concerto
    Ravel - Tzigane
    Ravel - La Valse
    Holst - The Planets

    If none of these do anything for you, there's always jazz!

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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Since no one was recommended Sibelius or Dvorak, I'm going to go ahead and do it. They are, quite simply, two of the easiest composers of the late-Romantic/Early Modern to get into. Everyone has heard Dvorak's 9th symphony "From the New World", and his Slavonic Dances are incredible. Sibelius' symphonies will blow your mind with their development and melody. It's a complete rejection of Wagnerian leitmotiffs, which, while they are cool, get tiresome in non-Operatic works.

    Everyone likes to point out all of the famous works that you should start at, which is fine, if you haven't heard them before. But if you have heard them before, they get boring really quick (except Beethoven's 9th, the greatest piece ever composed). So, I'm going to recommend some not-so-famous (at least in the public consciousness) pieces that you should get into. Starting with the Baroque stuff...

    Baroque:
    Telemann. He was the most prolific composer around (over 3000 compositions). He was more famous than Bach during his day.
    Bach. Specifically, his masterwork, the Art of the Fugue. He was, obviously, the master of the Fugue, and this was his magnum opus, just as the Requiem was Mozart's.
    Handel. The Messiah is very famous, but I enjoy his Water Music too. It's fun.
    Vivaldi. He composed 37 concerti for bassoon. All of them are really good.

    Classical:
    Haydn's 104th Symphony blows my mind (and it's fun to play, too). Especially the fourth movement.
    Mozart has many, many amazing works. Specifically, the Jupiter Symphony, Overture to the Magic Flute, Overture to Marriage of Figaro, and, as previously mentioned, his Reqiuem in D Minor.
    Beethoven - everyone knows his stuff. It's all good.

    Romantic:
    Brahms!! Everyone loves Brahms. My favourite is Beethoven's 10th symphony (aka Brahms' Symphony No. 1).
    Mahler, as stated earlier takes the symphonic medium to the extreme.
    Schumann. An underrated composer, most definitely. His clarient and piano works are pretty cool, but I enjoy his First and Third Symphonies the best.
    Mussorgsky. His Night on the Bald Mountain and Pictures at an Exhibition are well known for being awesome pieces of program music - definitely check them out.
    Rimsky-Korsakov. This guy was the master of orchestration. His most well -known work is Sheherazade, which I absolutely enjoy.
    Tchaikovsky. Most people think of the 1812 Overture or the Nutcracker Suite. Personally, his Second and Sixth Symphonies are my favourite by him. Also, his First Piano Concerto (which I have a recording by Kilburn) is awesome.

    Early Modern:
    Elgar. Specifically, his Engima Variations. Nimrod, from the Enigma Variations is probably one of, if not the most beautiful piece of music ever written.
    Vaugh Williams wrote a shitload of really good stuff, but the Sea Symphony, and Variations on a Welsh Hymn Tune blow my mind.
    Holst wrote two of the best pieces for military band, ever. His First Suite in Eb and Second Suite in F are so awesome - not just for their simplicity, but for the wonderful melodic writing.
    Shostakovich. If you want a glimpse into the grotesque, he is for you. My favourite is his Second Piano Concerto, which was written for his son's birthday. Also, check out his Leningrad Symphony, which, although standard fare has the best invasion theme ever. Very cool.
    Rachmaninoff for anything piano.
    Prokofiev, also for anything piano.

    Modern:
    Eric Whitacre! I can't get enough of this guy. He writes almost exclusively for chorus and wind band, but his compositions are totally awesome. Ghost Train, Equus, October (my favourite), and Sleep are some of my favourite by him.

    saggio on
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    InsiderInsider Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Wow thanks for the help guys. Just one question before I start trying all this stuff out: when I go to download some of these it has what seems to me different versions of the same piece. Like one says Allegro (which means fast right?), Adante, Adagio, etc. Which of these should I download? All of them? Just confused about that.

    And Poldy I love literature and movies, its just music I seem to have the most problems with.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Insider wrote:
    Wow thanks for the help guys. Just one question before I start trying all this stuff out: when I go to download some of these it has what seems to me different versions of the same piece. Like one says Allegro (which means fast right?), Adante, Adagio, etc. Which of these should I download? All of them? Just confused about that.

    And Poldy I love literature and movies, its just music I seem to have the most problems with.

    A symphony traditionally has four parts, or movements. The parts you are listing are the movements. For example, the four movements in Mozart's 41th Symphony are Allegro Vivace, Andandte cantabile, Menuetto & Trio, and Molto Allegro.

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    saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Insider wrote:
    Wow thanks for the help guys. Just one question before I start trying all this stuff out: when I go to download some of these it has what seems to me different versions of the same piece. Like one says Allegro (which means fast right?), Adante, Adagio, etc. Which of these should I download? All of them? Just confused about that.

    And Poldy I love literature and movies, its just music I seem to have the most problems with.

    Unless you join an exclusive torrent community, you are going to have a hard time downloading 'classical' music. Most works are in movements, and some of them are harder to find than others. Allegro, Adante, Adagio et. al are Italian tempo markings, and are usually used for the name of pieces and movements in non-program music. So, say, when you are looking for Shostakovich's Second Piano Concerto, you are looking for all of it's three movements - the names of which happen to be Allegro, Andante and Allegro.

    My suggestion: check out amazon.com if you have some money for the works mentioned previously. It's your best bet. Or, better yet, go to the flea market and find yourself some old LP's for a couple cents a piece. That's how I found my Karajan recordings.

    EDIT: Didn't see Poldy.

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    InsiderInsider Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Ok thanks.

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    RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Has Barber's adagio's for strings been mentioned?

    Excellent work.

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Rchanen wrote:
    Has Barber's adagio's for strings been mentioned?

    Excellent work.
    I hate that piece. I really do. I don't understand it when serious classical music listeners get so excited about it. I don't see any authentic emotion or creativity in the piece at all.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Rchanen wrote:
    Has Barber's adagio's for strings been mentioned?

    Excellent work.
    I hate that piece. I really do. I don't understand it when serious classical music listeners get so excited about it. I don't see any authentic emotion or creativity in the piece at all.

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    RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Always been one of my favorites, I like the way the various strains of the music flow around each other.

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    The_Indigo_ApocalypseThe_Indigo_Apocalypse Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    *GASP* I absolutely LOVE Barber's Adagio for Strings

    And I think it is very emotional, it's just more restrained and composed than some other pieces. The magnificence of that piece is that it doesn't need to have a million different show-offs playing what sounds to the audience like a technically difficult passage. It's simplicity is key, and if you play it you find that it is actually a very difficult piece to play well and requires a lot of control.

    I have played this piece before, and I must say if the entire group performing it puts their heart and soul into it it can be an extremely emotional piece. It starts out quietly with a haunting line and continuosly builds up until it reaches a rather large climax of music which seems to turn into light. In that moment one is able to see all of that pent up emotion explode. It then returns to the same quieted refrain as the beginning and slowly dies away to a murmur.

    I some some people mention Mahler as taking this type of music to an extreme, and I agree, but I think one of the more extreme and heavy composers would be Wagner. Though, I'm not sure I would recommend too much of his music now for you Insider. Though he does have some great pieces.

    Oh, I would give a listen to Saint-Saens and Bartok as well.

    I also saw that someone mentioned Shastakovitch, yay! I personally like his 1st Symphony. It's quite the piece.

    You know, I think the movie The Elephant Man uses it very well at the end. Maybe if you guys who don't like it see that it'll be a little more clear on how it can be emotional?

    ANYWAY, Insider--another great place to get a hold of classical music is at your local library. Or if you are in college right now you should be able to find plenty of things there in their library or in the music department where they often have recordings. Those are good options if you don't want to spend money on Amazon or at a bookstore like Borders (another good place to find CDs of classical music).


    Ohhh, has anyone mentione Scheherazad? That's a great piece to listen to, and easy to find as well. Hahaha, I'm pretty sure they play it in Harkin's Theaters sometimes.

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    YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Yes, the first argument when I say that "Adagio for Strings" is not particularly emotional or original is that it's elegant in its simplicity. To which I say, no. Here's a list of pieces that are simple and actually good (creative and emotional):

    Habanera from Carmen
    The 1st movement of the Elgar cello concerto
    The 1st movement of the Mozart clarinet concerto
    Debussy's La Mer
    Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata
    Faure's Pavane (sort of. Gets more credit in the "creative" category than in the "emotional" category, even though it is pretty emotional when played properly. And it's still more authentically emotional than "Adagio for Strings.")
    Brahms in general, particularly his Clarinet Sonata No. 1 and his German Requiem
    Obviously Ode to Joy

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    The_Indigo_ApocalypseThe_Indigo_Apocalypse Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Yes, the first argument when I say that "Adagio for Strings" is not particularly emotional or original is that it's elegant in its simplicity. To which I say, no. Here's a list of pieces that are simple and actually good (creative and emotional):

    Habanera from Carmen
    The 1st movement of the Elgar cello concerto
    The 1st movement of the Mozart clarinet concerto
    Debussy's La Mer
    Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata
    Faure's Pavane (sort of. Gets more credit in the "creative" category than in the "emotional" category, even though it is pretty emotional when played properly. And it's still more authentically emotional than "Adagio for Strings.")
    Brahms in general, particularly his Clarinet Sonata No. 1 and his German Requiem
    Obviously Ode to Joy

    I completely agree with you about all of those pieces you listed, they are indeed beautiful, elegant, and simple in their presentation.

    But I shall have to say we should agree to disagree about The Adagio. To each his own.

    The first moevemnt of the Elgar Cello Concerto is not that simple, and neither are most of Brahms's works.

    Ohhh, I love Debussy's La Mer!

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    SquirrelmobSquirrelmob Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    I'm sure someone has said this before, but

    The Valkyrie by Wagner is Throw Up The Horns! good.

    But almost all classical music is good.

    Tchaikovsky is awesome.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    The Valkyrie by Wagner is Throw Up The Horns! good.

    I hate you so much. I hate you so fucking much. I fucking hate you so fucking much. I fucking hate fucking you fucking so fucking much.

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    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    Anyone got an opinion on Richard Goode, specifically his Waldenstein and Appassionata? Seems pretty good to me, but I'm pretty shitty at evaluating piano skills. All I can really do is stringed talent.

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    KraliasKralias Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    He's supposed to be pretty good, and has a respected set of Beethoven Piano Sonatas. Does pretty well critically, but he has a vocal minority that completely hates his playing style. The Beethoven I've heard by him sounded good.

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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    So, songs.

    Not just songs, song songs. I have a decent amount of Schubert and nearly all of Mahler's. A few other composers (Berlioz, Mussorgsky, Berg).

    Who to look into next? Schumann? Wolf?

    Edit: On a related note, Mussorgsky's Songs and Dances of Death are excellent. I particularly love the Trepak. Amazingly creepy.

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