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The Amazing Spider-Thread

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    SentrySentry Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Sentry wrote: »
    Two things happened to boost his powers.

    1. Spider-Man: Disassembled- A bug... uh.... queen lady... came and altered Spider-Man to bring him closer to his insect side. This let (uh.. Spider-Man) talk with spiders (even though they aren't insects, they explained it in the comic), as well as gave him his organic web shooters.
    2. The Other: This supposedly brought Spider-man closer to the spider side of his being, which boosted his spider sense, strength, and gave him those wrist spikes. And who knows what the future holds...
    Spider-Man: Disassembled also featured the best performance of Mary-Jane Watson-Parker as Stone Cold Bitch-Woman.

    Well, Spidey shouldn't have umm... been forced to make out with that queen thing on national television. He just has no respect...

    Sentry on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
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    Target PracticeTarget Practice Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Sentry wrote: »
    Sentry wrote: »
    Two things happened to boost his powers.

    1. Spider-Man: Disassembled- A bug... uh.... queen lady... came and altered Spider-Man to bring him closer to his insect side. This let (uh.. Spider-Man) talk with spiders (even though they aren't insects, they explained it in the comic), as well as gave him his organic web shooters.
    2. The Other: This supposedly brought Spider-man closer to the spider side of his being, which boosted his spider sense, strength, and gave him those wrist spikes. And who knows what the future holds...
    Spider-Man: Disassembled also featured the best performance of Mary-Jane Watson-Parker as Stone Cold Bitch-Woman.

    Well, Spidey shouldn't have umm... been forced to make out with that queen thing on national television. He just has no respect...

    I was referring more to her badgering him into going to a party when she knew he was turning into some kind of man-spider

    "So you have hairier arms! Just wear long sleeves! And sunglasses will cover up those segmented eyes!"

    Target Practice on
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    Me Too!Me Too! __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2007
    Why is he wearing the black suit? Is it because of what happened at the end of Civil War, or is it because of
    some really bad shit happening to Aunt May

    or is it neither of those? Because the black suit is the shit, even if he stopped wearing it because Venom showed up.

    Me Too! on
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    MiSTieOtakuMiSTieOtaku Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Why is he wearing the black suit? Is it because of what happened at the end of Civil War, or is it because of
    some really bad shit happening to Aunt May

    or is it neither of those? Because the black suit is the shit, even if he stopped wearing it because Venom showed up.

    All those reasons but actually it's because of the movie.

    MiSTieOtaku on
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    TerrorbyteTerrorbyte __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2007
    Could anyone scan a panel of Spidey talking to spiders? I seem to have blocked all that awful stuff out.

    Terrorbyte on
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    FuruFuru Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    He can't actually talk with spiders, because spiders don't talk. They're spiders.

    It's really just more of a "I know all about spiders just by looking at them" power.

    Furu on
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    TerrorbyteTerrorbyte __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2007
    Dang. It'd be pretty cool if he got a talkin' spider sidekick. That, like, smoked cigars and told filthy jokes and stuff.

    Terrorbyte on
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    Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The sunny beaches of CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited March 2007
    I don't actually mind the psychic link with spiders, because there doesn't necessarily have to be anything mystic about it for it to be a plausible part of his powers. It's just like an extension of his spider-sense - a 6th sense that warns him of danger but also lets him tap into the instincts of spiders (and other creatures) that have a similar sense.

    Golden Yak on
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    MiSTieOtakuMiSTieOtaku Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    I'm still trying to figure out how getting bit by a radioactive spider basically turned him into some sort of Spider Avatar or Spider Totem God thing.

    MiSTieOtaku on
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    Mai-KeroMai-Kero Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    I'm still trying to figure out how getting bit by a radioactive spider basically turned him into some sort of Spider Avatar or Spider Totem God thing.

    Well, basically, Anansi is sitting over there in africa or wherever that pantheon is from, and he notices this dude dressing up as a spider and crawling on walls and whatnot and he thinks to himself "That guy would make a pretty good avatar."

    Mai-Kero on
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    ScooterScooter Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    I think the idea was that he was chosen to be a totem first, the spider specifically chose him to bite, but the radioactivity messed with things.

    Scooter on
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    RingoRingo He/Him a distinct lack of substanceRegistered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Terrorbyte wrote: »
    Dang. It'd be pretty cool if he got a talkin' spider sidekick. That, like, smoked cigars and told filthy jokes and stuff.

    And have him only show up in FNSM and never be mentioned in any of the other books. Hilarity!


    Waitaminute

    Why oh why do I find myself agreeing with Terrorbyte here? I need to have a lie down.

    Ringo on
    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
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    The Muffin ManThe Muffin Man Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Ringo wrote: »
    Terrorbyte wrote: »
    Dang. It'd be pretty cool if he got a talkin' spider sidekick. That, like, smoked cigars and told filthy jokes and stuff.

    And have him only show up in FNSM and never be mentioned in any of the other books. Hilarity!


    Waitaminute

    Why oh why do I find myself agreeing with Terrorbyte here? I need to have a lie down.

    It'd be better if no on else heard it, or saw it smoking cigars.
    So you'd see Pete sitting with the Avengers and all of a sudden.
    "WHAT!? That's my WIFE! No, I don't CARE how hot you think she is. That's disgusting. And put that thing out."
    Meanwhile everyone sees him arguing with his shoulder.

    The Muffin Man on
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    NogsNogs Crap, crap, mega crap. Crap, crap, mega crap.Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Ringo wrote: »
    Terrorbyte wrote: »
    Dang. It'd be pretty cool if he got a talkin' spider sidekick. That, like, smoked cigars and told filthy jokes and stuff.

    And have him only show up in FNSM and never be mentioned in any of the other books. Hilarity!


    Waitaminute

    Why oh why do I find myself agreeing with Terrorbyte here? I need to have a lie down.

    It'd be better if no on else heard it, or saw it smoking cigars.
    So you'd see Pete sitting with the Avengers and all of a sudden.
    "WHAT!? That's my WIFE! No, I don't CARE how hot you think she is. That's disgusting. And put that thing out."
    Meanwhile everyone sees him arguing with his shoulder.

    I'm not gonna lie...this sounds awesomely hilarious. I'm picturing the spider from Garfield, and its just too funny.

    Nogs on
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    ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Mai-Kero wrote: »
    I'm still trying to figure out how getting bit by a radioactive spider basically turned him into some sort of Spider Avatar or Spider Totem God thing.

    Well, basically, Anansi is sitting over there in africa or wherever that pantheon is from, and he notices this dude dressing up as a spider and crawling on walls and whatnot and he thinks to himself "That guy would make a pretty good avatar."

    He's a trickster god. Spiderman is actually a damn near perfect avatar for him.

    Thomamelas on
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    Mister SpeedMister Speed Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    I've never been so happy in all my comic reading life as when i read at Newsarama that JMS was leaving ASM this year. He started great, but basically since midway through the Ezekiel/Morlun arc he's been trying to change Spider-Man into his own comic book, and in a very John Byrne-esque fashion figures it's easiest to do by destroying everything that came before. Sins Past was a travesty, and no editor in their right mind would allow the script that was finalized to be published. And the retooling of Pete's power origin is... Well, it's far beyond stupid, it's narcissistic, unnecessary and lazy. He did the same thing with the Fantastic four; had to go and retell their origins. Now, of course, because he doesn't know crap about the history of the MU, there are more unanswered questions than there were before "If you purposely gave the FF their powers whil transported back in time and across the universe by a nearly all powerful but not alien, then why do the U-Foes have powers? Why did Ben re-mutate when exposed again to cosmic rays? And what about former team-mate Sharon Ventura?).

    Not to mention that the story robs Pete of his individuality and makes his choices less meaningful; He was chosen to be Spider-Man because of what he would do with the powers, rather than deciding on his own; (an annoying statement about free will) and makes him one of a chain rather than one of a kind.

    I say No Thanks to you, J. Michael Straczynski; you sir, are a tired hack and I cannot wait for you to be gone.

    Mister Speed on
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    Bloods EndBloods End Blade of Tyshalle Punch dimensionRegistered User regular
    edited March 2007
    I liked JMS on Spidey.

    Most of the time at least.

    SINS PAST NEVER HAPPENED

    Of course I'd like to Adam Troy-Castro on after JMS leaves. But that will never happen.

    Bloods End on
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    LRGLRG Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    JMS started pretty good, but with all the stupid changes he decided to make, I'd say his run has brought more bad than good. Kinda like Hudlin.


    Kirkman should take over Amazing after JMS, he'd get Spidey back in a good place.

    LRG on
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    MunchMunch Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Bloods End wrote: »
    I liked JMS on Spidey.

    Most of the time at least.

    SINS PAST NEVER HAPPENED

    To be fair, his original story was that Gwen Stacy got pregnant by Peter, so Peter would have had some kids running around he didn't know about, and be forced to deal with the ramifications of it. Then editorial got ahold of it and changed it to the profoundly retarded story it came out as. That still doesn't pardon him for writing the damn thing, and even the original idea of aging Pete by giving him kids (again) was pretty dumb, but it's worth noting at least.

    Munch on
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    FuruFuru Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    I would kill so many hookers to get Joss Whedon on Amazing.

    Furu on
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    DarkWarriorDarkWarrior __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2007
    With any luck they'll ret-con that Gwen Stacy stuff out by saying it was another elaborate plan by the Goblin to fuck with Peter. Seriously. Why would sweet, innocent Gwen nail that old psycho?

    DarkWarrior on
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    Desktop HippieDesktop Hippie Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Mai-Kero wrote: »
    I'm still trying to figure out how getting bit by a radioactive spider basically turned him into some sort of Spider Avatar or Spider Totem God thing.

    Well, basically, Anansi is sitting over there in africa or wherever that pantheon is from, and he notices this dude dressing up as a spider and crawling on walls and whatnot and he thinks to himself "That guy would make a pretty good avatar."

    He's a trickster god. Spiderman is actually a damn near perfect avatar for him.

    He's supposed to be pretty smart too, which is also true of Peter.

    But yeah, I take the point on The Other storyline robbing Peter of his original choice somewhat. It also kind of lessens the impact of Uncle Ben's death. Isn't that supposed to be the pivotal event of Peter's life, the driving force that made him who he is?

    Still, having watched Babylon 5 I'm not surprised JMS is going for a destiny thing instead. It's very much his kind of style. Not that that's a bad thing, I just don't think that it sits well with Spider-Man.

    Desktop Hippie on
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    HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Mai-Kero wrote: »
    I'm still trying to figure out how getting bit by a radioactive spider basically turned him into some sort of Spider Avatar or Spider Totem God thing.

    Well, basically, Anansi is sitting over there in africa or wherever that pantheon is from, and he notices this dude dressing up as a spider and crawling on walls and whatnot and he thinks to himself "That guy would make a pretty good avatar."

    He's a trickster god. Spiderman is actually a damn near perfect avatar for him.

    He's supposed to be pretty smart too, which is also true of Peter.

    But yeah, I take the point on The Other storyline robbing Peter of his original choice somewhat. It also kind of lessens the impact of Uncle Ben's death. Isn't that supposed to be the pivotal event of Peter's life, the driving force that made him who he is?

    Still, having watched Babylon 5 I'm not surprised JMS is going for a destiny thing instead. It's very much his kind of style. Not that that's a bad thing, I just don't think that it sits well with Spider-Man.

    I think it somewhat diminishes Spider-Man if the only reason he's a hero is because he indirectly got his Uncle killed.

    It's okay for him to think that, but if it's truly the case then Peter has just been repressing his selfish, vindictive nature this entire time.

    Hooraydiation on
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    Me Too!Me Too! __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2007
    But that WAS what pushed him to be a hero. He was gonna just chill, make some money, and then Ben died, and he realized what an ass he was being. So, he became a hero because he learned his lesson. If his uncle didn't die, he probably wouldn't have learned it as quickly. Sounds like a good mini, actually, kinda like Bullet Points in reverse.

    Me Too! on
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    HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    But that WAS what pushed him to be a hero. He was gonna just chill, make some money, and then Ben died, and he realized what an ass he was being. So, he became a hero because he learned his lesson. If his uncle didn't die, he probably wouldn't have learned it as quickly. Sounds like a good mini, actually, kinda like Bullet Points in reverse.

    Yeah, there's no doubt in my mind that a teenager would take substantially longer to realize his full potential without a traumatic event to push him in the right direction. What I have a problem with is the idea that he wouldn't have figured things out on his own eventually, as if he was motivated entirely by guilt without an iota of personal goodness to his name to spur him on.

    There actually have been "What If..."s where Ben Parker doesn't die, and I think they've all had Spider-Man becoming a selfish brat who ends up in show business full time. House of M and the universe that the alternate Ben Parker in FNSM hailed from would be the most recent examples.

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    DarkWarriorDarkWarrior __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2007
    He was good but like people, even other marvel heroes say, noone would choose his current life if they didn't have to. Yeah he could be a hero even if Uncle Ben didn't die but why would he risk his life and the lives of his loved ones for it? The death of Ben illustrated the cost of inaction and the death of Gwen illustrated the cost of action.

    DarkWarrior on
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    OwenashiOwenashi Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    CBR showed off a trio of alternate covers for some Spidey-title reprints hitting the stores on April 11th. Here's a look at them for those curious.

    SM-FAM-1-2nd.jpg
    SENS-35-2nd.jpg
    FNS-17-2nd.jpg

    Owenashi on
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    WildcatWildcat Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    I like the cute homage in the last one.

    Wildcat on
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    HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Steamboat Spider-Man!

    Hooraydiation on
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    BriareosBriareos Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    I think it somewhat diminishes Spider-Man if the only reason he's a hero is because he indirectly got his Uncle killed.

    I'd like to tell you about this superhero called Spider-Man. See, he started out as just a kid, named Peter Parker. Peter got bit this radioactive spider, and the bite ended up giving him the powers of a spider. He could climb walls and had the proportionate strength of a spider.

    At first, Peter decided he could use his cool new powers to impress chicks and make money. One day, he witnessed a crime in progress, and he let the criminal run off, even though with his powers he could have easily stopped the guy.

    Ironically, the same criminal later gunned down Peter's Uncle Ben, his father figure. Peter realized that if he had stopped the criminal, Ben would still be alive. He then vowed to never again fail to act when he had the power to do so. He vowed to use his powers responsibly and to fight crime.

    Peter Parker became a superhero because he indirectly caused Uncle Ben's death.

    Briareos on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Except, as most people are willing to point out, nobody would choose Spider-Man's life. This includes all the other people who have lost loved ones due to their own actions or inaction and even have the resources, skills, or abilities necessary to become superheroes themselves.

    Most people who feel responsible for the death of a loved one come to terms with it or eventually decide that it wasn't really their fault (and it wasn't Peter's fault). They don't spend the rest of their lives trying to atone, especially not at great personal expense and even at the potential cost of the lives of their loved ones on top of their own life.

    Unless you take into account that there was already something wholly unique about Peter, nothing he does make sense. His reaction to Ben's death isn't the natural, logical response to such an event, even taking the powers and, "With great power comes great responsibility," axiom.

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    ScooterScooter Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    I'm pretty sure guilt is by far Peter's driving motivation. Starting with Ben, and then moving on to every other person that could or would be hurt if he wasn't there to stop the bad guys.

    Scooter on
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    BriareosBriareos Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Most people who feel responsible for the death of a loved one come to terms with it or eventually decide that it wasn't really their fault (and it wasn't Peter's fault). They don't spend the rest of their lives trying to atone, especially not at great personal expense and even at the potential cost of the lives of their loved ones on top of their own life.

    This is patently untrue. All you need to do to see evidence of how people will spend the rest of their lives, through great sacrifice, trying to atone for guilt over a loved one's death is to look around at the myriad of organizations and foundations created by the parents of children who died from one disease or another, or in a tragic drunk driving accident, or by suicide, or by any other cause.


    For example, it's not really some mommy's fault that Junior got killed by a drunk driver, but some mommy went and spent the rest of her life at great personal expense to found M.A.D.D. and turn it into a powerful organization. Maybe mommy felt indirectly responsible for Junior's death because she knew about the dangers of drunk driving, but she never spoke out. Now, in some small part, she blames herself for Junior's death, and tries to atone through M.A.D.D.

    Briareos on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    SentrySentry Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Scooter wrote: »
    I'm pretty sure guilt is by far Peter's driving motivation. Starting with Ben, and then moving on to every other person that could or would be hurt if he wasn't there to stop the bad guys.

    Yeah... it's not like Peter's guilt begins and ends with Ben... you have Gwen, MJ, his dead daughter, Harry Osborn, Eddie Brock to a certain extent, hell, (I'm pretty sure) he even feels some guilt over the damn symbiote. Peter has what we like to call a guilt complex. He thinks everything is, in some way, his fault.

    Sentry on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
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    HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Briareos wrote: »
    Most people who feel responsible for the death of a loved one come to terms with it or eventually decide that it wasn't really their fault (and it wasn't Peter's fault). They don't spend the rest of their lives trying to atone, especially not at great personal expense and even at the potential cost of the lives of their loved ones on top of their own life.

    This is patently untrue. All you need to do to see evidence of how people will spend the rest of their lives, through great sacrifice, trying to atone for guilt over a loved one's death is to look around at the myriad of organizations and foundations created by the parents of children who died from one disease or another, or in a tragic drunk driving accident, or by suicide, or by any other cause.


    For example, it's not really some mommy's fault that Junior got killed by a drunk driver, but some mommy went and spent the rest of her life at great personal expense to found M.A.D.D. and turn it into a powerful organization. Maybe mommy felt indirectly responsible for Junior's death because she knew about the dangers of drunk driving, but she never spoke out. Now, in some small part, she blames herself for Junior's death, and tries to atone through M.A.D.D.

    While you never hear about the people who lose a son and don't start an organization on his behalf, that doesn't mean such people don't exist and, furthermore, are not the norm.

    Wouldn't you say the woman who started Mothers Against Drunk Driversing is unique? Consider everyone else who lost a loved one to a drunk driver prior to the creation of MADD, and didn't do anything at all aside from simply coming to terms.
    I'm pretty sure guilt is by far Peter's driving motivation. Starting with Ben, and then moving on to every other person that could or would be hurt if he wasn't there to stop the bad guys.

    Guilt can motivate a person without being the cause of their actions, however.

    Peter's immediate reaction to Ben's death was to put on his Spider-Man costume and chase down the killer (just like Batman, the Punisher, and the rest did), even without knowing that he'd encountered the killer before. Would he have done this if there wasn't already a capacity for heroism within him?

    "With great power comes great responsibility" can really mean anything you want it to and, without Ben Parker applying the idea specifically to exactly what responsibilities a person would have upon receiving Spider-Powers, the interpretation was left exclusively to Peter. Ultimately, how Peter Parker chose to use his gifts and the strength of will and character he's shown along the way are all to his credit. Such things don't spontaneously develop following a tragedy. Rather, they can only be awakened.

    Guilt certainly fuels Spider-Man, but guilt isn't a little man that tells you what to do. It's just something that pushes you into doing something you likely already had a penchant for. People with suicidal thoughts finally kill themselves and people who were already wearing costumes and chasing down bad guys just keep on doing that.

    Hooraydiation on
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    BriareosBriareos Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Briareos wrote: »
    Most people who feel responsible for the death of a loved one come to terms with it or eventually decide that it wasn't really their fault (and it wasn't Peter's fault). They don't spend the rest of their lives trying to atone, especially not at great personal expense and even at the potential cost of the lives of their loved ones on top of their own life.

    This is patently untrue. All you need to do to see evidence of how people will spend the rest of their lives, through great sacrifice, trying to atone for guilt over a loved one's death is to look around at the myriad of organizations and foundations created by the parents of children who died from one disease or another, or in a tragic drunk driving accident, or by suicide, or by any other cause.


    For example, it's not really some mommy's fault that Junior got killed by a drunk driver, but some mommy went and spent the rest of her life at great personal expense to found M.A.D.D. and turn it into a powerful organization. Maybe mommy felt indirectly responsible for Junior's death because she knew about the dangers of drunk driving, but she never spoke out. Now, in some small part, she blames herself for Junior's death, and tries to atone through M.A.D.D.

    While you never hear about the people who lose a son and don't start an organization on his behalf, that doesn't mean such people don't exist and, furthermore, are not the norm.

    Wouldn't you say the woman who started Mothers Against Drunk Driversing is unique? Consider everyone else who lost a loved one to a drunk driver prior to the creation of MADD, and didn't do anything at all aside from simply coming to terms.
    I'm pretty sure guilt is by far Peter's driving motivation. Starting with Ben, and then moving on to every other person that could or would be hurt if he wasn't there to stop the bad guys.
    Guilt can motivate a person without being the cause of their actions, however.

    Peter's immediate reaction to Ben's death was to put on his Spider-Man costume and chase down the killer (just like Batman, the Punisher, and the rest did), even without knowing that he'd encountered the killer before. Would he have done this if there wasn't already a capacity for heroism within him?

    "With great power comes great responsibility" can really mean anything you want it to and, without Ben Parker applying the idea specifically to exactly what responsibilities a person would have upon receiving Spider-Powers, the interpretation was left exclusively to Peter. Ultimately, how Peter Parker chose to use his gifts and the strength of will and character he's shown along the way are all to his credit. Such things don't spontaneously develop following a tragedy. Rather, they can only be awakened.

    Guilt certainly fuels Spider-Man, but guilt isn't a little man that tells you what to do. It's just something that pushes you into doing something you likely already had a penchant for. People with suicidal thoughts finally kill themselves and people who were already wearing costumes and chasing down bad guys just keep on doing that.

    Chasing down the killer wasn't heroism, it was for vengeance.

    Briareos on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    LRGLRG Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Owenashi wrote: »
    CBR showed off a trio of alternate covers for some Spidey-title reprints hitting the stores on April 11th. Here's a look at them for those curious.

    SM-FAM-1-2nd.jpg
    SENS-35-2nd.jpg
    FNS-17-2nd.jpg

    I like how the Lizard is copping a feel from Mary Jane in that second one.

    LRG on
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    HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Briareos wrote: »

    Chasing down the killer wasn't heroism, it was for vengeance.

    He was angry, but I don't think he was planning to kill the guy. And if anything, realizing that it was the same guy should have made Peter even angrier and caused him to decapitate the crook out of a mixture of wrath and self-loathing. But he didn't, even though Ben never said anything about not killing murderers with your super-strength.

    Does vengefulness preclude heroism anyway? Marvel's premiere superhero team is called the Avengers. And if so, then why wouldn't guilt do the same?

    Hooraydiation on
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    BriareosBriareos Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Vengeance is selfish and personal.

    Guilt is actually a useful emotion. It tells us there's something wrong, even when we don't really want to recognize it. Guilt can prompt healthy introspection and change (if you listen to it and try to identify what's causing it).

    Vengeance is an eye for an eye. It might make the wronged individual feel better, but it rarely does anyone else any good (and it often doesn't do much for the wronged individual).

    Briareos on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    Briareos wrote: »
    Vengeance is selfish and personal.

    Guilt is actually a useful emotion. It tells us there's something wrong, even when we don't really want to recognize it. Guilt can prompt healthy introspection and change (if you listen to it and try to identify what's causing it).

    Vengeance is an eye for an eye. It might make the wronged individual feel better, but it rarely does anyone else any good (and it often doesn't do much for the wronged individual).

    Well, given the fact that Spider-Man didn't take an eye for an eye, I'd say vengeance wasn't exactly what was on his mind.

    And I wouldn't say guilt is what you described, so much as remorse. I've never known a feeling of guilt to turn you into something more than you were before. Rather, guilt tears you down.

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