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A/V troubles....

YodaTunaYodaTuna Registered User regular
Ok, I'm going to try posting this here first since I didn't know where the hell to post it in the AVS forums.

Here's the deal, I just bought a new receiver that transcodes analog signals into digital signals, basically it means I can output my component signals from the receiver via HDMI to the TV.

Here's what happens, I have an older 360 with no HDMI ports on it(fuck Microsoft for adding shit) so it's chained like this =

Xbox 360 -> Component -> A/V switch -> Component -> Receiver -> Component -> TV. Everything is peachy as shit.

Now if I change it to this:

Xbox 360 -> Component -> A/V switch -> Component -> Receiver -> HDMI -> TV, I get horizontal lines on the screen which diminish(but still appear) the higher I set the resolution.

So I did this
Xbox 360 -> Component -> Receiver -> HDMI -> TV.
This also works fine, which leads me to believe it may be my A/V switch, but I didn't have the lines when I was outputting via component, which makes me question my previous assumption.

Any other possibilities I'm not seeing? Any solutions or problems? I could just output via component for now, but once I get a PS3, I'll be setting that up via HDMI and the less connections I have going to my TV, the easier my life will be.

YodaTuna on

Posts

  • ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited April 2008
    It's possible - and I'm just pulling this out of my ass - that the signal degradation caused by the A/V switch is severe enough to confuse transcoder in the receiver, such that you get those artifacts on the screen. Shouldn't a receiver capable of upconverting analog signals to digital have enough inputs to obviate the need for a video switch?

    ElJeffe on
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  • YodaTunaYodaTuna Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    It's possible - and I'm just pulling this out of my ass - that the signal degradation caused by the A/V switch is severe enough to confuse transcoder in the receiver, such that you get those artifacts on the screen. Shouldn't a receiver capable of upconverting analog signals to digital have enough inputs to obviate the need for a video switch?

    That's what I was thinking though, but when I just use component, the picture is perfectly clear. Why don't I see any degredation there? The only thing I can think of is that the upconverting is amplifying some degredation that I can't see through the component cables. Seems like a pretty big jump though.


    I may be able to take the A/V switch out of my setup. But it's a nice looking box and I paid a bit of money for it. I don't have as many systems hooked up as I used to.

    YodaTuna on
  • YodaTunaYodaTuna Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    So, it looks like my A/V switch is causing some signal degradation, which sucks ass.:( You just have to be really god damn close to the TV to notice it, but it's definitely there. Balls.

    YodaTuna on
  • ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited April 2008
    YodaTuna wrote: »
    So, it looks like my A/V switch is causing some signal degradation, which sucks ass.:( You just have to be really god damn close to the TV to notice it, but it's definitely there. Balls.

    Yup. A/V switches always cause signal degradation. Adding extension cords, using longer cables - that's the bitch with analog. Pretty much any case other than a very short and thick cable with gold connectors is going to result in signal loss. It's not often that noticeable, but it's easy to baby-step your way into a shitty signal. Anything you want to look pretty should always go either straight to the TV or into a receiver, which will usually amplify the signal somewhat to offset the degradation.

    ElJeffe on
    I submitted an entry to Lego Ideas, and if 10,000 people support me, it'll be turned into an actual Lego set!If you'd like to see and support my submission, follow this link.
  • FristleFristle Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    I use the Audio Authority A/V switch and simple no-frills component cables, and don't see any degradation. And I would be all over that shit if it was there. I'm so picky that when a single pixel dies on a display I can't stand using it any more.

    Man that switch gets more expensive every year. I swear I paid much less when I got one in 2002.

    Fristle on
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