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Dangerous to operate a computer with one side open? [Solved]

BulbasaurBulbasaur Registered User regular
edited May 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
So, I just finished putting together my new computer and much to my dismay when I tried to power it on nothing at all happened. Well, actually, the dismay was short lived because the motherboard I was using had an onboard power switch that I was able to use to start the computer.

Well, I've since succesfully installed windows and all my hardware is accounted for which leads me to believe I've got a faulty power switch (I checked and triple checked the power switch connector's proper attachment to the motherboard) so circumstances being what they are I'm going to have to get a new case eventually.

In the meantime though is it safe for me to operate the system with one side off? (I can only get to the motherboard power switch with the side off and I'm kinda hesitant to put the giant metal side on while everything is running since it's a tool-less dealy and takes a bit of jimmying and rough housing to get it back on properly.)

Is there a difference between running the computer on a light load (browsing the internet and word processing) and a heavy load (heavy duty gaming)?

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    GanluanGanluan Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    It's not dangerous, but be aware that air circulation will be worse than if you had a well-ventilated case, and dust will be a concern. If this is just a short term solution, I'd keep a fan nearby pointed at it just in case, and you should be fine.

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    Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    The problem with leaving the side panel off is that exhaust fans may not be able to expel hot air as easily since there's no channel of air flow. I'm not sure it's that bad, but if you plan on doing any heavy gaming or whatever that you watch your temps. As far as the difference between light load and heavy load processing, the more work your computer has to do, the more heat it generates.

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    taliosfalcontaliosfalcon Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Depending on the case having the side panel off will actually be an improvement. I.e on the Sonata series taking off the side panel will generally drop system and cpu temps by 3-8 degrees. Yes on a case with good airflow its detrimental, but the majority of cases do not have good airflow

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    BulbasaurBulbasaur Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Alright, that's a relief. Thanks guys, I guess that solves that.

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    DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    If it's going to be awhile until you get a replacement case, you could always buy a simple switch (I think most computer switches are momentary, normally open switches) and connect it to the leads going to the original switch. You could potentially tear out the old switch and put this one in it's place, or just have the leads extend outside the case to the new switch so you don't have to leave your case open.

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    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2008
    With some exceptions, running without the side panel will lower system temperature. It essentially gives access to a much larger volume of air to disperse heat in to. In addition, without the confines of the case, hot air will more naturally flow out of the case instead of needing to be pumped out through fans.

    However, while it will likely improve temperatures, your computer will become a little dust haven. Be sure to blow it out fairly frequently (once a week would probably be reasonable). If you're fine with dusting your computer every week, then you shouldn't have a problem. If you forget to do that, then dust can build up rather quickly and short things out.

    Premier kakos on
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    BulbasaurBulbasaur Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Daenris wrote: »
    If it's going to be awhile until you get a replacement case, you could always buy a simple switch (I think most computer switches are momentary, normally open switches) and connect it to the leads going to the original switch. You could potentially tear out the old switch and put this one in it's place, or just have the leads extend outside the case to the new switch so you don't have to leave your case open.

    Well, I'm not so sure it's that simple with the case I've got. It's a Coolermaster Cosmos S and it doesn't have your typical pressure based switch. It's one of those new fangled biometric ones that is supposed to respond to body heat. So I'm probably SoL on do it yourself repairs on the switch.

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    DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Well... most of that is (most likely) in the switch itself. If your switch just has two leads connecting it to the motherboard (which it most likely does) then it can be replaced with another switch.

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    BulbasaurBulbasaur Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Daenris wrote: »
    Well... most of that is (most likely) in the switch itself. If your switch just has two leads connecting it to the motherboard (which it most likely does) then it can be replaced with another switch.

    Ohhh, yeah, I see what your saying now. That's a pretty good idea. I'll look into it.

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    AtomBombAtomBomb Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    You could run pretty much any 2 wires out of the case that you can connect to the pins on the mobo. Touch the wires together for a second and you can start your PC like you're hotwiring a car in the movies. Just make sure they don't touch any other metal or each other and you're golden.

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    WillethWilleth Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I worked in a job building computers for a short while and we just used to touch the two power pins on the mobo together with a ballpoint.

    Willeth on
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