Options

DIY Oil Changes - Some brief questions

2»

Posts

  • Options
    DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    saltiness: You can usually be ticketed for performing auto maintenance on a public right-of-way; it would vary by municipality, but I'm sure it would be prohibited in SF.

    And if you're in an apartment, performing maintenance on your car in the community parking lot is usually prohibited in the lease agreement. Some home-owners associations prohibit auto maintenance performed on property if it's viewable from the street, but I'm not sure what an HOA could do to you.

    Djeet on
  • Options
    Vladimir7Vladimir7 Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I always put down 2 cement blocks per wheel, build a ramp using whatever blocks of hard sturdy wood is laying around and then drive onto the cement blocks. I then remove the blocks of wood and grab a couple more cement blocks and put them behind the rear wheels (I do this in our Barn).. Been doing this for years never had a problem.
    But now that I got a job in the city, I have been lately taking it to a lube shop... It costs maybe only $5-10 more than doing it myself, and generally takes a tad less time.

    Vladimir7 on
  • Options
    fuelishfuelish Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Another issue with parking on the curb is it only raises the car about five inches, barely room to get under much less acutally work.

    Vladimir, do you mean a block of solid concrete or a cinder block?. Cinder blocks are real brittle, I saw some gory safety films in tech school involving cinder blocks and the heavy things on them. I use Rhino ramps. cheap, strong, fit under low slung cars with hitting the spoiler. I prefer ramps over stands for oil changes anyway, takes less time to get the car in the air. I will put in a vote for Wix filters.

    fuelish on
    Another day in the bike shop Pretty much what it sounds like. The secret lifestyle, laid open.
  • Options
    Vladimir7Vladimir7 Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    2-3 slabs of solid concrete block, would never ever do it with cinder.

    Vladimir7 on
  • Options
    Monolithic_DomeMonolithic_Dome Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    So is there an advantage to doing it yourself (aside from the cost savings, that is) ?

    Like firewater, when you say that you aren't comfortable with the local places, is this because they are run by the mob or something?

    I mean I do it at wherever because I'm lazy, but if I'm ruining my car I could totally learn how.

    Monolithic_Dome on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Well... at most places you're probably going to get cheap oil and cheap filters. Aside from that I can't really think of other negatives.

    Daenris on
  • Options
    Vladimir7Vladimir7 Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    So is there an advantage to doing it yourself (aside from the cost savings, that is) ?

    Like firewater, when you say that you aren't comfortable with the local places, is this because they are run by the mob or something?

    I mean I do it at wherever because I'm lazy, but if I'm ruining my car I could totally learn how.

    I don't know about where you live, but around here most lube shops will basically change your oil at cost (i.e you would probably only save $5-10 doing it yourself). They try to get you on the extras, like a new fan belt, break pads, air freshener, etc

    Vladimir7 on
  • Options
    ZonkytonkmanZonkytonkman Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Newton wrote: »
    Disposal and oil usually runs $20, and a wal-mart oil change runs $25

    Where do you live? I've never been charged to dispose of used oil. I just take it in to Schucks and they take it for free as long as their tank isn't full.

    this is the same where i live. (NL, Canada) My dad is famous for doing 5 hours of work to save a 100$ bill, and even he takes his vehicles to a dealer to get the oil changed.

    Zonkytonkman on
  • Options
    firewaterwordfirewaterword Satchitananda Pais Vasco to San FranciscoRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Well, without offending anyone who happens to work at Pennzoil, I'll say that I wouldn't trust the guys at my local one any farther than I could throw them. One particular thing: they failed to properly secure the drain plug on my coworkers Explorer, leading to one hell of a mess in their parking lot, and me giving her a ride to work while they got that shit fixed. Not to mention the upselling and general shadiness which is rampant there.

    It's not so much a cost thing (well, it is when the dealership wants $120) as it is a "make sure it's done right, and get some personal satisfaction as well" thing. I'll fully admit to being anal about this car. Plus, I enjoy getting my hands dirty, and any excuse to use tools is a good one.

    firewaterword on
    Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavantu
  • Options
    beefbeef Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    My auto instructor advised against Pennzoil oil. He said that there are traces of paraffin in it and he had seen it build up like ear wax in engines over time.

    beef on
  • Options
    fuelishfuelish Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    My only issue with lube shops is they often hire guys that cannot get a job at a repair shop. When I was in highschool(25 years ago) they forgot to tighten the drain plug and it fell out in traffic, damage to the motor, they refused to help, etc, etc. Never been back since. I had a boss get the tranny in his 4x4 ruined when they forgot to refill it after doing a full fluid change(pumpkins, transfer case, tranny, engine) He had to take them to court to get any money out of them.

    As far as oil quality, just look at the API rating on the bottle. That is the two letter code in a circle, the oil weight is also in this circle. As long as the API rating is at least as high as what you service manual requires and the weight is correct for the car(and the season) brand really does not matter. Buy a brand name oil that is the cheapest. They are all made from the same base stock and have the same additives needed to get the API rating. Right now (I think) most quality oil is rated SL, but SM is the new standard and that might be what most are rated at now.(After a quick run out to the shop I see the oil is all rated SM, both the 5w20 for the new car and the 10w40 for the older cars. Even the straight 30w for the mower is rated SL.)
    Again, difference in branding is about 99% hype, as long as the API standard is met.

    As far as cost, to do it yourself, five quarts and a filter will cost you about $25(Oil is getting pricy)

    fuelish on
    Another day in the bike shop Pretty much what it sounds like. The secret lifestyle, laid open.
Sign In or Register to comment.