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The glory of a Logitech Harmony remote; now I have a few questions

LunkerLunker Registered User regular
After spending months wrangling with trying to explain to my wife the rigid, arcane rites of our A/V setup, and her getting frustrated beyond belief, I finally caved and bought the 360 version of the Harmony 550. It's excellent, setup's a breeze, and everything turns on and off. Worlds better than the shitty $15 Nyko universal remote I had before.

I have a question, though: The way our stuff is set up, everything is plugged into my TV, and then I send the audio out to my Kenwood receiver. When watching cable, I leave the receiver off and we just use the TV speakers, but when using my 360 to play or watch movies, I turn the volume down all the way on the TV and turn on the receiver to use those speakers. Ideally I want to tell my remote to turn the TV volume all the way down for using the 360, but if I use a "TV mute" command it leaves the Mute indicator lingering on the screen. Is there a way to tell my remote to crank the volume all the way down without manually adding 40 individual "volume down" commands into the macro? I'm just lazy but also curious as to how the remote processes the commands.

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Posts

  • ToyDToyD Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    I think the answer to your question would be a no. Since the remote has no way of knowing what your TV volume is set at and it is doubtful there is a "set tv volume = 0" infrared command for the tv, I don't think you can do this. Most people would use mute for that, but I understand why you're trying to avoid it.

    I would maybe see if you can swap it so your components go into the receiver, then out to tv. Maybe browse monoprice for some inexpensive A/V switches that are IR controllable if you need extra inputs of something.

    Remember, the remote can talk to everything, but in order for it to get something to happen, it has to know the state your stuff is currently in. states of on/off and inputs are pretty easy to have remembered. states of volume, not so much.

    ToyD on
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  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Yeah, probably not. You can either create a macro to just turn the volume down manually, or try to create a macro to go through the menu and disable/enable the built-in speakers (might be less keypresses, and faster...depends on your menu, though, and if it comes up in a known state).

    mcdermott on
  • Crack_ShotCrack_Shot Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Is there really no way to remove the mute indicator from the screen? On an old TV of mine, hitting the info button a couple of time would get rid of any annoying on screen info or indicators.

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  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Crack_Shot wrote: »
    Is there really no way to remove the mute indicator from the screen? On an old TV of mine, hitting the info button a couple of time would get rid of any annoying on screen info or indicators.

    Depends on the TV. Of the last three I owned, only on two of them could you make it go away.

    mcdermott on
  • cctex823cctex823 Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Personally, i'd run the TV audio using the receiver and keep the speakers on the TV off. Or even run everything directly into the receiver, inputs permitting.

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  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    cctex823 wrote: »
    Personally, i'd run the TV audio using the receiver and keep the speakers on the TV off. Or even run everything directly into the receiver, inputs permitting.

    Depends. If you're talking about TV shows where you don't really care about surround sound or even general audio quality, a receiver both uses more electricity (possibly up to 200W more) and generates more heat.

    mcdermott on
  • cctex823cctex823 Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Obviously he bought the remote for convenience. What I proposed is, to me, the most convenient.

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  • maximumzeromaximumzero I...wait, what? New Orleans, LARegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    You'd be surpised how great shows that you wouldn't expect to sound great sound great.

    ...buh.

    Stuff like freaking Spongebob Squarepants, for example, occasionally has some neat positional audio bits.

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  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    cctex823 wrote: »
    Obviously he bought the remote for convenience. What I proposed is, to me, the most convenient.

    Well, there's convenience combined with "having a remote that I can make do exactly what I want it to do with a minimum number of buttonpresses, on all my equipment." Which yours fails on. If he wanted to just run everything through his receiver, he'd not have created this thread. The remote can easily do that with the included wizards.

    Also, at least in my experience, if you want to do anything more than basic tasks/setups with standard gear you're looking at a little bit of set-up to begin with on the Harmony remotes. It pays off in the long run, though.

    mcdermott on
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Macros cannot accept that many button presses on the Harmony. I learned this when trying to make it easy to change to 16:9 on my 4:3 set. What I had to do was generate a page of soft buttons with TV menu controls. Not as easy, but it's still one remote. So go ahead and nix all options for doing this. Your only real option is to get a different universal remote, teach IT a macro of lowering your TV volume X times, teach that macro to your Harmony, and repeat it 40/X times.
    I would really reconsider using your surround setup for general TV watching as well.


    Actually, you may have some other options.
    Can you mute the sound at the source? Not muting the TV, but your cable/satellite box?
    You might be able to finagle something with sending the TV a false audio signal, maybe from a Video X that you don't have anything connected to.

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  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Actually, you may have some other options.
    Can you mute the sound at the source? Not muting the TV, but your cable/satellite box?
    You might be able to finagle something with sending the TV a false audio signal, maybe from a Video X that you don't have anything connected to.

    You're misunderstanding his issue. He can't send the TV a false audio signal, because he's using it to do his signal switching and send his audio to his receiver (so the receiver would get the same false signal).

    mcdermott on
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Maybe if his receiver supports Zone 2 he can make his TV Zone 2?

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  • ToyDToyD Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    How about we hope he uses the stuff like he's supposed to and uses the tv as a monitor and everything else goes to the receiver? This is how they're made to perform. Buy an extra IR controlled switch if you have to. The solutions to this are getting pretty crazy.

    ToyD on
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