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Good recent fantasy/sci-fi/wacky historical fiction to look for

ErgandarErgandar Registered User regular
edited June 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
Alright, I understand many threads of this nature have been made in the past, but I'm searching for relatively recent (2007-2008) releases of sci fi/fantasy/historical fiction novels.

I've read Malazan and ASOIaF, along with a bajillion other books, but I'm intending on passing through the new releases section of the library with a vengeance, not the 3-4 yrs old section.

What books would you guys recommend?

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    OremLKOremLK Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    I've recommended this before, and I'll recommend it this time, as well: Enchantment by Orson Scott Card is a fantasy retelling of the old Sleeping Beauty tales, with a decidedly historical bent to it. You'll see what I mean if you read it.

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    mightyspacepopemightyspacepope Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    I liked the Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone series by Greg Keyes. It has the shifting viewpoints of ASoIaF, but the characters are a bit more of the usual fantasy archetypes (scrappy princess, charming duelist, idealistic young knight, etc). Despite dealing with the cliches, he still puts enough of a spin on it to make it memorable and the writing compels you to keep reading, even when it's 2AM and you need to wake up in four hours for work. It's a four book series, with the fourth one just being released a few months ago.

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    DrFrylockDrFrylock Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    It's a bit older (10 years?), but have you read James Morrow's "Godhead" trilogy (Towing Jehovah, Blameless in Abaddon, and The Eternal Footman)? If you're looking for wacky speculative fiction, there it is. The premise of the first book: God, quite literally, dies. His two-mile-long corpse (naked, of course) falls into the Atlantic Ocean. A troubled ex-oil tanker captain (a thin pastiche of Joseph Hazelwood) is hired by the archangels (and the Vatican) to tow his body into a tomb in the arctic.

    If the premise isn't strange enough, the books themselves are. The humor is so black that it rides the razor's edge between whimsy and deeply disturbing.

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    TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss is so much better than like, everything.

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    Centipede DamascusCentipede Damascus Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
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    ihmmyihmmy Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Sabriel, Lirael and Abhorsen by Garth Nix (trilogy)
    Golden Book of Faerie by O Melling
    A Rumor of Gems by Ellen Steiber

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    Bryse EayoBryse Eayo Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Accelerando and Singularity Sky By Charles Stross.


    Oh and Halting State by him aswell if you want *really* recent.

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    QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Matter by Iain Banks just came out. I haven't read it yet but he writes good stuff.

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    Casual EddyCasual Eddy The Astral PlaneRegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Soon I Will be Invincible was quite fun

    oh and so was Gods Behaving Badly

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    DaxonDaxon Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss is so much better than like, everything.

    God yes, this book is just brilliant.
    Read Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell.

    Do it now.

    This book is really not for everyone, I liked it but it often felt a bit too slow and boring at times. The writing felt a bit clunky as well when I was reading it.

    Daxon on
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    Arch Guru XXArch Guru XX Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    The best historical fiction book I've ever read was Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson. It has two connected plot lines - one during WWII about characters who are responsible for staging various fake actions for the Allies so that the Axis powers won't know that their encryption has been broken. The second plot line takes place in the present day and features the descendants of the the WWII characters working to set up an international data haven and trying to recover a whole crapload of missing Nazi gold. The book is huge (800 pages or thereabouts) and will definitely take a while to read, but it is also completely awesome.

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    Dunadan019Dunadan019 Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    if you actually want a book that has all of those elements i suggest Dan Simmons Hyperion series.

    http://www.amazon.com/Hyperion-Dan-Simmons/dp/0553283685/ref=pd_bbs_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214488515&sr=8-2

    published in the 90s but very good. it gets philosophical and religious in the later books just a warning.

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    ErgandarErgandar Registered User regular
    edited June 2008

    I have

    Twice

    It's fantastic

    EDIT: I've also read The Name of the Wind

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    RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    There's this series that is basically written in the style and same time period as Patrick O'Brien, except the Royal Navy has an air corps that rides dragons. So that pretty much pushes all your buttons right there. Here's the first book in the series: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0345481283/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

    I can't vouch for it, but it got really good reviews in my local newspaper's book section.

    Edit: published in 2006, relatively recent.

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    LeptonLepton Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Little, Big -- John Crowley
    Jim Butcher -- Dresden Files
    Anything by Alastair Reynolds

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    TarantioTarantio Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    You could try the 1632 series, which I think is still being written. It's about a small town in modern west virginia that gets transported to a spot in the Holy Roman Empire in 1632.

    I always suggest David Gemmel in these threads, too- he has some things that came out very recently, though he died a year or two ago. All his books are about badass heroes.

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    KartanKartan Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    RUNN1NGMAN wrote: »
    There's this series that is basically written in the style and same time period as Patrick O'Brien, except the Royal Navy has an air corps that rides dragons. So that pretty much pushes all your buttons right there. Here's the first book in the series: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0345481283/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

    I can't vouch for it, but it got really good reviews in my local newspaper's book section.

    Edit: published in 2006, relatively recent.

    It is awesome, and the next book is due out in mid-july.

    Kartan on
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    QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    I've enjoyed Jo Walton's slipstream stories, but they aren't really that fantasy oriented. More like alternate history fiction.

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    Centipede DamascusCentipede Damascus Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Ergandar wrote: »

    I have

    Twice

    It's fantastic

    you are a gentleman and a scholar

    Centipede Damascus on
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    TrueHereticXTrueHereticX We are the future Charles, not them. They no longer matter. Sydney, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    The Temeraire Series by Naomi Novik

    Dragons in the Napolenoic Wars

    megafuckawesome

    TrueHereticX on
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    mightyspacepopemightyspacepope Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    The Temeraire Series by Naomi Novik

    Dragons in the Napolenoic Wars

    megafuckawesome

    I thought so too, but I got through the first book and it seemed to me like too much of the book was about the feelings of a man and his dragon during the Napoleonic Wars.

    I wanted more HOLY SHIT DRAGON AIR FORCE but it seemed like a lot of touchy-feely "bond between a man and his dragon" blah blah blah.

    Does it get better in the sequel books?

    mightyspacepope on
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    PlutoniumPlutonium Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss is so much better than like, everything.

    I was told that the guy who wrote it used to post on PA.

    Anyways, I recommend it.

    Plutonium on
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    Page-Page- Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    The Gentlemen Bastards books by Scott Lynch. I've only read the first one, The Lies of Locke Lamora, since the second one is always out of stock (probably a good sign), but it's amazing fun, and a great break from traditional fantasy books.

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    noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Plutonium wrote: »
    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss is so much better than like, everything.

    I was told that the guy who wrote it used to post on PA.

    Anyways, I recommend it.

    Sure did. There was a bit of hoopla in the writer's block, but don't let that stop you from reading it. Probably one of the best fantasy books I read in a long time. Also one of the few that I can remember actually tearing up for.

    Edit- Oh shit. No one has recommended Altered Carbon? For shame. For shame

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    KartanKartan Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    The Temeraire Series by Naomi Novik

    Dragons in the Napolenoic Wars

    megafuckawesome

    I thought so too, but I got through the first book and it seemed to me like too much of the book was about the feelings of a man and his dragon during the Napoleonic Wars.

    I wanted more HOLY SHIT DRAGON AIR FORCE but it seemed like a lot of touchy-feely "bond between a man and his dragon" blah blah blah.

    Does it get better in the sequel books?

    Kinda. Its never really "military fiction", recounting battle after battle after battle, but the third book goes into the prussian campaign and shows off very well how Novik manages to both completely alter history (airborne warfare since the days of the crusades) while still keeping it mostly similiar (Prussia still loses, and badly)

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    LamoidLamoid Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    How many of these books have a space ship/ space station on the cover?

    Lamoid on
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    AresProphetAresProphet Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Wacky historical fiction, you say?

    The Baroque Cycle. Three thousand pages of fictitious characters, an adventure yarn, and near-magic/alchemy mingling with economics and the likes of Liebniz, Newton, and Louis XIV.

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    CreepyCreepy Tucson, AzRegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Page- wrote: »
    The Gentlemen Bastards books by Scott Lynch. I've only read the first one, The Lies of Locke Lamora, since the second one is always out of stock (probably a good sign), but it's amazing fun, and a great break from traditional fantasy books.

    I can vouch for both of these. They're great.

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