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Pedophile sues AMEX for getting him sent to jail

jungleroomxjungleroomx It's never too many graves, it's always not enough shovelsRegistered User regular
edited August 2008 in Debate and/or Discourse
http://consumerist.com/5031964/convicted-pedophile-sues-amex-for-4-million-says-creditor-violated-his-privacy
Meet James Colliton, a disbarred corporate lawyer who served 19 months in jail after bribing a mother so he could sleep with her 13 and 15 year-old daughters. Colliton recently sued American Express for $4 million, claiming that he was captured because the credit card company told authorities that the fugitive gutter-cretin was signing for hotel rooms in Ontario.

So what do you all think? Did American Express do the right and moral thing and turned this fucker in using his private credit information, or did they overstep their bounds and violated his right to privacy?

Me personally? Fuck yes, Amex. Good move.

jungleroomx on
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Posts

  • CantidoCantido Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
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    Cantido on
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  • DarkWarriorDarkWarrior __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2008
    Wait, did the mum actually let him sleep with the daughters?

    DarkWarrior on
  • monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    So, wait he jumped bail and fled the country then charged things to his credit card and that's what led to his arrest? Wouldn't there have been a warrant for his arrest and surveillance on his charge cards in the first place where AmEx wouldn't have had a choice in the matter regardless?

    moniker on
  • IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited August 2008
    How is that "bribing?" The woman pimped her daughters out.

    Incenjucar on
  • monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    How is that "bribing?" The woman pimped her daughters out.

    She probably testified against him to avoid prostitution charges.

    moniker on
  • IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Makes sense.

    I hate lifeforms.

    Incenjucar on
  • zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    So what do you all think? Did American Express do the right and moral thing and turned this fucker in using his private credit information, or did they overstep their bounds and violated his right to privacy?

    Me personally? Fuck yes, Amex. Good move.

    I'm sorry, is this thread about the "right & moral(tm)" thing to do or about the letter of the law? I can't be arsed reading the AMEX T&C, but if they don't have an escape clause about sharing information with law enforcement, they may be on for some ride.
    I couldn't give a fuck if it's "right & moral" for AMEX to do X in a privacy case if they are doing something illegal.
    No company should volunteer information against its privacy policy unless there is a specific law obliging them to do so.

    tl:dr, Scumbag is a scumbag. Mother is a scumbag. AMEX may also be scumbags, depending on what their T&C and relevant laws say.

    zeeny on
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    I am of the opinion that it's likely Amex would be in more legal trouble had they not informed the authorities that they knew the whereabouts of a fugitive.

    japan on
  • QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    japan wrote: »
    I am of the opinion that it's likely Amex would be in more legal trouble had they not informed the authorities that they knew the whereabouts of a fugitive.
    They shouldn't be in any at all since, as moniker noted, there was most likely a warrant out for his arrest since he'd jumped bail and fled the country.

    Quid on
  • ScooterScooter Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    It's not like there's some dude at Amex looking for pedo reports in the news and then looking up their activity to see if they can find them. The only reason they would look is if a warrant or some other official request required them to.

    Scooter on
  • noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    zeeny wrote: »
    So what do you all think? Did American Express do the right and moral thing and turned this fucker in using his private credit information, or did they overstep their bounds and violated his right to privacy?

    Me personally? Fuck yes, Amex. Good move.

    I'm sorry, is this thread about the "right & moral(tm)" thing to do or about the letter of the law? I can't be arsed reading the AMEX T&C, but if they don't have an escape clause about sharing information with law enforcement, they may be on for some ride.
    I couldn't give a fuck if it's "right & moral" for AMEX to do X in a privacy case if they are doing something illegal.
    No company should volunteer information against its privacy policy unless there is a specific law obliging them to do so.

    tl:dr, Scumbag is a scumbag. Mother is a scumbag. AMEX may also be scumbags, depending on what their T&C and relevant laws say.

    Exactly. The question shouldn't be whether AMEX did the right thing(as moral wise, they did), but if what the company did is lawful or an invasion of privacy.

    noir_blood on
  • Satanic JesusSatanic Jesus Hi, I'm Liam! with broken glassesRegistered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Who cares if it's an invasion of privacy? He's a fucking pedo!

    Satanic Jesus on
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  • NocturneNocturne Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    VISA, it's everywhere you want to be. Specifically if you want to be inside children.

    Nocturne on
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Quid wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    I am of the opinion that it's likely Amex would be in more legal trouble had they not informed the authorities that they knew the whereabouts of a fugitive.
    They shouldn't be in any at all since, as moniker noted, there was most likely a warrant out for his arrest since he'd jumped bail and fled the country.

    That's what I mean. The only way I can see Amex being in any trouble is if they knew where he was and didn't inform the authorities (what with the warrant, and all). I'm fairly certain that's a crime.

    Besides, who goes on the run and uses their damn credit card?

    japan on
  • monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Who cares if it's an invasion of privacy? He's a fucking jew!

    Godwin, Godwin, olol.

    moniker on
  • monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    japan wrote: »
    Quid wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    I am of the opinion that it's likely Amex would be in more legal trouble had they not informed the authorities that they knew the whereabouts of a fugitive.
    They shouldn't be in any at all since, as moniker noted, there was most likely a warrant out for his arrest since he'd jumped bail and fled the country.

    That's what I mean. The only way I can see Amex being in any trouble is if they knew where he was and didn't inform the authorities (what with the warrant, and all). I'm fairly certain that's a crime.

    Besides, who goes on the run and uses their damn credit card?

    Someone who needs frequent flyer miles?

    moniker on
  • GR_ZombieGR_Zombie Krillin It Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    1z1a49dlp0.jpg

    GR_Zombie on
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  • zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    japan wrote: »
    Quid wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    I am of the opinion that it's likely Amex would be in more legal trouble had they not informed the authorities that they knew the whereabouts of a fugitive.
    They shouldn't be in any at all since, as moniker noted, there was most likely a warrant out for his arrest since he'd jumped bail and fled the country.

    That's what I mean. The only way I can see Amex being in any trouble is if they knew where he was and didn't inform the authorities (what with the warrant, and all). I'm fairly certain that's a crime.

    Besides, who goes on the run and uses their damn credit card?

    You both could be quiet right as the guy's quotes seem totally irrelevant to his lawsuit. However, both articles are really, really skinny on details. Can a lawyer be filing this even knowing that AMEX satisfied a warrant? Fuck yeah, but I'm still not sold that this is the case.

    zeeny on
  • DasUberEdwardDasUberEdward Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    What's up with all of the memes? Anyway they did a bad thing to stop someone from doing a bad thing but everyone honestly knows that your credit information is anything but "private" when it comes to when and where you use it.

    DasUberEdward on
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  • DarkWarriorDarkWarrior __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2008
    Seems stupid of him really. General people really don't like paedophiles and anything that puts his face in the papers and alerts people to his location probably won't end well for him.

    DarkWarrior on
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    The stories linked from the blog don't line up at all. The main one has him claiming to have gone to Canada to "see some races" while the Canadian Press link has him claiming that Canadian courts might be more lenient.

    I do like his defense for being out of the country though: "You don't use your credit cards if you're a fugitive!" I'm sure he knows that now.

    DevoutlyApathetic on
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  • DalbozDalboz Resident Puppy Eater Right behind you...Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Who cares if it's an invasion of privacy? He's a fucking pedo!

    He's a corporate lawyer. That alone should be enough to send him to the chair.

    Anyway, I'm pretty sure AMEX and most other credit card companies, as well as utilities (including ISPs) have clauses in their service agreements that says that your information could be shared with law enforcement, as well as other affiliated companies unless you opt out. That will probably get AMEX off the hook.

    Dalboz on
  • Salvation122Salvation122 Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    I'm pretty sure you can't get busted for reporting a crime. The precedent set by whistleblower protection should apply.

    Salvation122 on
  • ege02ege02 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2008
    I think both parties are at wrong here. The guy is a fucking pedophile. As much as I want to believe AMEX did the right thing, I don't think they did. It was his private information.

    This comes to blame not being zero-sum, again.

    It will most definitely hurt AMEX's credibility and trustability, that's for sure. And that is their punishment.

    ege02 on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    ege02 wrote: »
    I think both parties are at wrong here. The guy is a fucking pedophile. As much as I want to believe AMEX did the right thing, I don't think they did. It was his private information.

    This comes to blame not being zero-sum, again.

    It will most definitely hurt AMEX's credibility and trustability, that's for sure. And that is their punishment.

    I'm sure future pedophiles will think twice before using their AMEX while on the the run.

    I'm not too sure AMEX is going to care though.

    geckahn on
  • GoumindongGoumindong Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    I'm pretty sure you can't get busted for reporting a crime. The precedent set by whistleblower protection should apply.

    I am pretty sure this guy is right.

    Privacy laws are there to keep people from being unjustly accused and persecuted, to keep the public discourse clean, and to reduce the incidence of blackmail.

    This guy was a fugitive who had jumped bail. Hell, for all we know AMEX could have been charged with aiding and abetting had they not turned over the information.

    Goumindong on
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  • King RiptorKing Riptor Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    ege02 wrote: »
    I think both parties are at wrong here. The guy is a fucking pedophile. As much as I want to believe AMEX did the right thing, I don't think they did. It was his private information.

    This comes to blame not being zero-sum, again.

    It will most definitely hurt AMEX's credibility and trustability, that's for sure. And that is their punishment.

    If a warrant of his credit files was issued they legally had to comply. Since these are police officers/detectives we're talking about I would assume they you know followed procedure so as not to jeopardize the case.

    King Riptor on
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  • DelzhandDelzhand Hard to miss. Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    GR_Zombie wrote: »
    snip

    You get the infractions, but I get the laughs.

    Aaaaanyway.

    I'm forced to admit that my hatred for pedos takes a backseat to my respect for privacy laws. If AMEX broke their contract to turn this guy in, they ought to pay a fine - but something where the money doesn't go to him. Restitution? Is that where the money basically gets held by the state? Not a lawyer.

    But if they were within their rights according to the terms of use, then get me the confetti, because I'm going to celebrate.

    Delzhand on
  • RingoRingo He/Him a distinct lack of substanceRegistered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Scooter wrote: »
    It's not like there's some dude at Amex looking for pedo reports in the news and then looking up their activity to see if they can find them.

    I can't be the only one who immediately thought of Pony, can I?

    Ringo on
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  • ege02ege02 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2008
    ege02 wrote: »
    I think both parties are at wrong here. The guy is a fucking pedophile. As much as I want to believe AMEX did the right thing, I don't think they did. It was his private information.

    This comes to blame not being zero-sum, again.

    It will most definitely hurt AMEX's credibility and trustability, that's for sure. And that is their punishment.

    If a warrant of his credit files was issued they legally had to comply.

    Legally, yes.

    Morally? I'm not so sure.

    ege02 on
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited August 2008
    ege02 wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    I think both parties are at wrong here. The guy is a fucking pedophile. As much as I want to believe AMEX did the right thing, I don't think they did. It was his private information.

    This comes to blame not being zero-sum, again.

    It will most definitely hurt AMEX's credibility and trustability, that's for sure. And that is their punishment.

    If a warrant of his credit files was issued they legally had to comply.

    Legally, yes.

    Morally? I'm not so sure.

    It doesn't matter. They aren't a person, they are a company. The company's responsibility is to their stockholders to run a legal business.

    Doc on
  • King RiptorKing Riptor Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    ege02 wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    I think both parties are at wrong here. The guy is a fucking pedophile. As much as I want to believe AMEX did the right thing, I don't think they did. It was his private information.

    This comes to blame not being zero-sum, again.

    It will most definitely hurt AMEX's credibility and trustability, that's for sure. And that is their punishment.

    If a warrant of his credit files was issued they legally had to comply.

    Legally, yes.

    Morally? I'm not so sure.

    I fail to see the moral dilemma. It's not like they're handing out social security numbers in a raffle drawing or something. They're aiding law enforcement.

    King Riptor on
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  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2008
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    Makes sense.

    I hate lifeforms.

    Honk on
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  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2008
    ege02 wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    I think both parties are at wrong here. The guy is a fucking pedophile. As much as I want to believe AMEX did the right thing, I don't think they did. It was his private information.

    This comes to blame not being zero-sum, again.

    It will most definitely hurt AMEX's credibility and trustability, that's for sure. And that is their punishment.

    If a warrant of his credit files was issued they legally had to comply.

    Legally, yes.

    Morally? I'm not so sure.

    How do you ever think it's not morally correct to help catch a pedophile? What right does said man have after what he's done? Don't police and credit card companies do this ALOT, to trace down fugitives? WHAT is the problem in this case - "pedophile caught but did we do the right thing this 1.230.182th time?".... boo hoo poor guy...

    Honk on
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  • ElkiElki get busy Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited August 2008
    That guy hilarious. His argument is that it would be really dumb for him to use his credit card if he was on the run, and therefore he wasn't on the run.

    Good luck with that one.

    Elki on
    smCQ5WE.jpg
  • FirstComradeStalinFirstComradeStalin Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    He's using the Chewbacca defense.

    "This does not make sense."

    FirstComradeStalin on
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  • GorelabGorelab Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Honk wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    ege02 wrote: »
    I think both parties are at wrong here. The guy is a fucking pedophile. As much as I want to believe AMEX did the right thing, I don't think they did. It was his private information.

    This comes to blame not being zero-sum, again.

    It will most definitely hurt AMEX's credibility and trustability, that's for sure. And that is their punishment.

    If a warrant of his credit files was issued they legally had to comply.

    Legally, yes.

    Morally? I'm not so sure.

    How do you ever think it's not morally correct to help catch a pedophile? What right does said man have after what he's done? Don't police and credit card companies do this ALOT, to trace down fugitives? WHAT is the problem in this case - "pedophile caught but did we do the right thing this 1.230.182th time?".... boo hoo poor guy...

    Rights aren't something that are taken away without due process. If there was a warrant and subpena, then this guy got what's coming to him. However, the law shouldn't be broken to catch someone just because there a pedophile. Yes. It's a horrible crime, but if we start taking away rights without a trail then the damage we do to our society is much worse.

    Gorelab on
  • Knuckle DraggerKnuckle Dragger Explosive Ovine Disposal Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    I think the big hurdle in his case is going to be, "To the extent permitted by law, we may disclose personally identifiable information to government authorities or third parties pursuant to a legal request, subpoena, or other legal process." Also, this is the fourth million dollar+ lawsuit this guy has filed in the past year and a half ($10 million over prison conditions, $10 million over civil rights violations by the DA's office and $1.5 million in wages, vacation and bonuses he claims his former employer owes him.

    Knuckle Dragger on
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  • trevelliantrevellian Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Who cares if it's an invasion of privacy? He's a fucking pedo!

    ITYM ephebophile.

    trevellian on
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  • SeolSeol Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    I think the big hurdle in his case is going to be, "To the extent permitted by law, we may disclose personally identifiable information to government authorities or third parties pursuant to a legal request, subpoena, or other legal process." Also, this is the fourth million dollar+ lawsuit this guy has filed in the past year and a half ($10 million over prison conditions, $10 million over civil rights violations by the DA's office and $1.5 million in wages, vacation and bonuses he claims his former employer owes him.
    The big hurdle he faces in justifying any damages. "If it were not for AMEX's actions, I would have been able to remain a fugitive from the law" is not going to be considered a compensatable loss, I'm pretty damn sure.

    edit: even if what AMEX did was a violation of this guy's right to privacy, even if what they did was illegal, he doesn't have a case in a civil suit for damages without being able to justify how he suffered a loss as a result. Here, he won't be able to.

    Seol on
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