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so about these animated shows on Fox...

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    SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Coldred wrote:
    Treeloot wrote:
    As far as modern Simpsons episodes go, last night's wasn't bad.

    The worst episode has to be the prescription drugs from Canada one. Jesus Christ that was a terrible episode. I think I could have written a better episode.
    The worst episode was the "Simpsons go to Britain" one. The guest appearance by Blair just makes me sick.
    It was no Simpsons go to Japan, that's for sure.

    Senjutsu on
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    TreelootTreeloot Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Coldred wrote:
    Treeloot wrote:
    As far as modern Simpsons episodes go, last night's wasn't bad.

    The worst episode has to be the prescription drugs from Canada one. Jesus Christ that was a terrible episode. I think I could have written a better episode.
    The worst episode was the "Simpsons go to Britain" one. The guest appearance by Blair just makes me sick.

    That one wasn't very good. I didn't see it until a few months after the original airing because I was actually in London at the time.

    The Pieman episode is probably second worst.

    Treeloot on
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    nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Coldred wrote:
    Treeloot wrote:
    As far as modern Simpsons episodes go, last night's wasn't bad.

    The worst episode has to be the prescription drugs from Canada one. Jesus Christ that was a terrible episode. I think I could have written a better episode.
    The worst episode was the "Simpsons go to Britain" one. The guest appearance by Blair just makes me sick.

    the msucial clip show was horrid

    nexuscrawler on
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    SpackleSpackle Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Senjutsu wrote:
    Coldred wrote:
    Treeloot wrote:
    As far as modern Simpsons episodes go, last night's wasn't bad.

    The worst episode has to be the prescription drugs from Canada one. Jesus Christ that was a terrible episode. I think I could have written a better episode.
    The worst episode was the "Simpsons go to Britain" one. The guest appearance by Blair just makes me sick.
    It was no Simpsons go to Japan, that's for sure.

    bwhahahahah

    Simpson's goto Japan is one of the best travel ones.

    *toilet does cool stuff*
    "They're YEARS ahead of us!"

    Spackle on
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    ColdredColdred Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Spackle wrote:
    Senjutsu wrote:
    Coldred wrote:
    Treeloot wrote:
    As far as modern Simpsons episodes go, last night's wasn't bad.

    The worst episode has to be the prescription drugs from Canada one. Jesus Christ that was a terrible episode. I think I could have written a better episode.
    The worst episode was the "Simpsons go to Britain" one. The guest appearance by Blair just makes me sick.
    It was no Simpsons go to Japan, that's for sure.

    bwhahahahah

    Simpson's goto Japan is one of the best travel ones.

    *toilet does cool stuff*
    "They're YEARS ahead of us!"
    The spasming robot show is great too.

    Coldred on
    sig1-1.jpg
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    jclastjclast Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Spackle wrote:
    Simpson's goto Japan is one of the best travel ones.

    *toilet does cool stuff*
    "They're YEARS ahead of us!"

    I liked Simpsons go to China, too. The singing dragons were excellent.

    jclast on
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    jonny_digitaljonny_digital Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    jclast wrote:
    Spackle wrote:
    Simpson's goto Japan is one of the best travel ones.

    *toilet does cool stuff*
    "They're YEARS ahead of us!"

    I liked Simpsons go to China, too. The singing dragons were excellent.

    Hey dragon, you fly like a girl!

    None of them hold a candle to their trip to Australia, however.

    jonny_digital on
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    KusuguttaiKusuguttai __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2006
    Bullfrogs? I would have called them codgewallops!

    (or something inane like that)
    (fuckin' aussies!)
    (jk jk jk)

    Kusuguttai on
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    ColdredColdred Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Kusugattai wrote:
    Bullfrogs? I would have called them codgewallops!

    (or something inane like that)
    (fuckin' aussies!)
    (jk jk jk)
    "No, this is a knife"

    "That's a spoon"

    Coldred on
    sig1-1.jpg
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    CambotCambot Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    I don't watch the other two shows, but The Simpsons writers need to learn how to write a story again, and not just this "oh Homer will just work for the mob, no questions asked." Also, why was Lisa in that final scene at all?

    They complain in the commentaries that Fox cuts the running time, but for the past two seasons it's been painfully obvious they extend gags and offer needless explaination just to fill up an episode. I don't mind not laughing at a Simpsons episode. In fact most of my favorites are my favorites because they have amazing storytelling in them, not for having some memorable comedy bit. But the way they've ran things the past two years they've been cutting every conerner narratively, and a bunch of dues ex machinas.

    Lazy writing can't save ok gags. Bad episode. Wasn't expecting much from a holdover episode of season 17 anyway.

    Cambot on
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    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Oh god, I'm not sure what my favorite episode is.

    Possibilities:

    Homer at the Bat
    The one with Scorpio
    Treehouse of Horror IV
    The astronaut one
    Mindy

    Edit: Monorail

    Elendil on
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    KusuguttaiKusuguttai __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2006
    Coldred wrote:
    Kusugattai wrote:
    Bullfrogs? I would have called them codgewallops!

    (or something inane like that)
    (fuckin' aussies!)
    (jk jk jk)
    "No, this is a knife"

    "That's a spoon"
    I see you know how to play ol' knifey-spoony

    Kusuguttai on
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    ColdredColdred Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Elendil wrote:
    Oh god, I'm not sure what my favorite episode is.

    Possibilities:

    Homer at the Bat
    The one with Scorpio
    Treehouse of Horror IV
    The astronaut one
    Mindy

    Edit: Monorail
    There are a lot of bloody good Simpsons episodes.

    Coldred on
    sig1-1.jpg
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    ZythonZython Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    For at least the later episodes, I find the beginning part of the episode, before the whole plot is established, to be the best part. Case in point, the slightly more than mediocre Tomacco episode was made great by the dueling glove and one of my favorite Simpsons jokes, "The Deadly Poke of Zorro".

    "'N'? What does 'N' stand for?"
    "No no no, it is a 'Z'. I am Zorro!"

    Zython on
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    CherrnCherrn Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Slicer wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    aquabat wrote:
    also, stop having a celebrity every. fucking. episode.
    I don't think it's so much the celebrities, just how poorly they tend to be worked into the show.

    I mean, one of my favorite episodes is Homer at the Bat. It can be done, provided the writing is good.

    A lot of the recent episodes contain celeberties just so they can say they have them. Most of the time instead of working them into the episode they just appear so they can say something like "Hey! It's (insert celebrity's name here)!"

    Though what I miss is when they were occasionally creating characters for celebrities to voice instead of just having the celebrity appear in the show.

    Ugh, the absolute worst case of this is the one where they go to London.

    Look, it's Tony Blair!
    Look, it's J.K. Rowling!
    Look, it's Ian McKellen!

    And they get into fun situations! That episode is seriously one of the very few Simpsons episodes I cannot stand to watch ever again. The christmas episode with Richard Gere is also one of these. Jesus christ.

    I actually stopped watching the show entirely after season 16. Does it get any better?

    Cherrn on
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    CambotCambot Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Cherrn wrote:
    I actually stopped watching the show entirely after season 16. Does it get any better?
    Season 17 was statstically the worst season ever due to the sheer amount of clunkers. A good 1/3 of the season was unwatchable. Frustratingly enough, another 1/3 was some of the most original material they've come up with in years. Still, when it's all said and done, probably the most outstanding feature of season 17 were the inventive couch gags; and that is pretty sad.

    Also, I've come to love a lot of season 16, in syndication. It's the most down to earth the series has been since season 3. I think back when it was new, it was a bit of a shock to deal with plots that were so comparatively boring. Now I find myself laughing at the dialouge much more often, and the "crazy" episodes feel more like a welcome change of pace rather than a "oh what the fuck are they doing now?" kind of feeling.

    Cambot on
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    TreelootTreeloot Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Cherrn wrote:
    Slicer wrote:
    Elendil wrote:
    aquabat wrote:
    also, stop having a celebrity every. fucking. episode.
    I don't think it's so much the celebrities, just how poorly they tend to be worked into the show.

    I mean, one of my favorite episodes is Homer at the Bat. It can be done, provided the writing is good.

    A lot of the recent episodes contain celeberties just so they can say they have them. Most of the time instead of working them into the episode they just appear so they can say something like "Hey! It's (insert celebrity's name here)!"

    Though what I miss is when they were occasionally creating characters for celebrities to voice instead of just having the celebrity appear in the show.

    Ugh, the absolute worst case of this is the one where they go to London.

    Look, it's Tony Blair!
    Look, it's J.K. Rowling!
    Look, it's Ian McKellen!

    And they get into fun situations! That episode is seriously one of the very few Simpsons episodes I cannot stand to watch ever again. The christmas episode with Richard Gere is also one of these. Jesus christ.

    I actually stopped watching the show entirely after season 16. Does it get any better?

    Season 17 had a few good episodes like the evolution one, and the one where they put boys and girls in different math classes and Lisa pretends to be a boy to join the male math class.


    I remember when an MSNBC.com columnist declared The Simpsons was brilliant again during season because of The President Wore Pearls. I got really hyped (MSNBC's comments came before the episode aired) for the episode but damn near fell asleep half way through it was so bad.

    Treeloot on
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    ArthArth Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    I could barely watch The Simpsons just because Otto's voice seemed REALLY really off. So I watched Eureka's premiere on the Space network up here in Canada. All in all, I'm happy with my choice.

    Arth on
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    jtmorgan61jtmorgan61 Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Not to lob bombs on a first post, but does anyone else think the simpsons were basically done around 1999, the way, say, SNL was done by the mid-80's?

    Some episodes are still funny, but the consistency and the sense that it's actually contributing anything meaningful to the cultural dialogue are long gone. Personally I can't stand to watch it anymore because I remember how it used to be.

    jtmorgan61 on
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    KusuguttaiKusuguttai __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2006
    jtmorgan61 wrote:
    Not to lob bombs on a first post, but does anyone else think the simpsons were basically done around 1999, the way, say, SNL was done by the mid-80's?

    Some episodes are still funny, but the consistency and the sense that it's actually contributing anything meaningful to the cultural dialogue are long gone. Personally I can't stand to watch it anymore because I remember how it used to be.
    What about all the early 90's SNLs with Mike Meyers, Dana Carvey, Chris Farley, Adam Sandler, Kevin Nealon, etc?
    Those are fucking gold

    Kusuguttai on
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    jtmorgan61jtmorgan61 Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    What about all the early 90's SNLs with Mike Meyers, Dana Carvey, Chris Farley, Adam Sandler, Kevin Nealon, etc?
    Those are fucking gold

    I think they parallel well with what we're seeing now from the simpsons. Some pretty good episodes here and there, but also quite a few clunkers we'd rather forget. When the humor misses, it's often "zany", forced and unfocused.

    I find it hard to agree that early 90's SNL had the cultural impact early simpsons or seinfeld were having at the same time.

    jtmorgan61 on
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    KusuguttaiKusuguttai __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2006
    jtmorgan61 wrote:
    What about all the early 90's SNLs with Mike Meyers, Dana Carvey, Chris Farley, Adam Sandler, Kevin Nealon, etc?
    Those are fucking gold

    I think they parallel well with what we're seeing now from the simpsons. Some pretty good episodes here and there, but also quite a few clunkers we'd rather forget. When the humor misses, it's often "zany", forced and unfocused.

    I find it hard to agree that early 90's SNL had the cultural impact early simpsons or seinfeld were having at the same time.
    Dear God, some of the skits made me laugh more than all of the good episodes of the simpsons combined.

    Kusuguttai on
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    SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    "SNL died in the 80's" people have their head so far up their ass it isn't even funny.

    Some of those mid-90s seasons are the strongest ever made. The show has its ebb and flow of talent, but it's beyond ignorant to claim they haven't done anything good in 20 years. There are a lot of crap skits from the "glory days" of SNL, too.

    Senjutsu on
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    KusuguttaiKusuguttai __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2006
    Once again, Senj speaks nothing but glorious limed truth

    Kusuguttai on
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    jtmorgan61jtmorgan61 Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    "SNL died in the 80's" people have their head so far up their ass it isn't even funny.

    Just so we're clear, I'm not those people. I'm not claiming that it *died* in the 80's, or that the mid-90's were total junk. I do think that it was more erratic, that the lows were more painful, and that although there were some great, new ideas in individual sketches it didn't have the same cultural impact.

    Anyway, we're getting offtopic. Sorry to derail the thread, but it's been years since I was genuinely excited to see a new season of the simpsons and I just miss that feeling.

    jtmorgan61 on
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    CambotCambot Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    I should make a chart of "criticism of SNL / Simpsons over the timespan of the popularity of the internet" with a "generation gap" variable.

    SNL has always been a cruddy show. It's just that over time, the crap is sifted out, and the gems remain. Thats why we have such a positive nostalgic rose colored glasses view of our generation (depending on how old you are, it's 80s or 90s.) Now, under the widespread scrutiny of the internet, it's a lot harder to let the dust settle. We're the internet. We love to bitch, criticize, and argue.

    Back to The Simpsons, I could name a ton of brilliant episodes from the past five years, but would I let any of them near my top ten? No, for a singular reason. I don't have these nostaligic memories of quoting the episodes the next day on the school bus, or being shocked by a gag at such an impressionable young age. Nostaligia always wins. I still double take when someone has favorite episodes from seasons 11-14, then I realize they're 5 years younger than me.

    Cambot on
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    VoodooVVoodooV Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    SNL is just simply hit big or miss big with very little middle ground

    VoodooV on
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    Ghost Rider 2099Ghost Rider 2099 Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    How many of you were betwean the ages 9 and 11 when Bart Simpson debuted.

    Ghost Rider 2099 on
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    KusuguttaiKusuguttai __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2006
    I was about five months old when the Simpsons got their own television show.

    Kusuguttai on
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    jtmorgan61jtmorgan61 Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Back to The Simpsons, I could name a ton of brilliant episodes from the past five years, but would I let any of them near my top ten? No, for a singular reason. I don't have these nostaligic memories of quoting the episodes the next day on the school bus, or being shocked by a gag at such an impressionable young age. Nostaligia always wins. I still double take when someone has favorite episodes from seasons 11-14, then I realize they're 5 years younger than me.

    There's a lot of truth to this response, but just to draw my ideas out a little more...

    Early simpsons (and seinfeld), in my opinion, was in large part a sharp critique of 80's-style family sitcoms where everyone Learns a Valuable Lesson, and the broader cultural hollowness that gave rise to these shows. This gave early seasons a vicious, sarcastic weight that carried them pretty easily even when the plot and gag writers were having off weeks. Eventually, of course, that cultural paradigm disappeared, and I've never felt like the show successfully moved on to new targets. They still bring up pop culture references in goofy, loosely connected ways, but don't subvert them in the aggressive fashion they used to.

    I'm curious if younger posters think present-day simpsons contributes anything to the cultural dialogue other than being a sometimes amusing half hour once a week.

    jtmorgan61 on
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    bernbaumbernbaum Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Kusugattai wrote:
    I was about five months old when the Simpsons got their own television show.

    I was 6 when my kid brother was born in '89, the year that the Simpsons hit out television screens. Thing is, he knows his simpsons episodes as well as I do.

    The kid has grown up in a world that has always had the Simpsons, in much the same way as say, Star Wars has always been around for me.

    As for celebs appearing in episodes, expect the film to be chock-full of poorly placed big name celebs.

    bernbaum on
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    KusuguttaiKusuguttai __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2006
    bernbaum wrote:
    Kusugattai wrote:
    I was about five months old when the Simpsons got their own television show.

    I was 6 when my kid brother was born in '89, the year that the Simpsons hit out television screens. Thing is, he knows his simpsons episodes as well as I do.

    The kid has grown up in a world that has always had the Simpsons, in much the same way as say, Star Wars has always been around for me.

    As for celebs appearing in episodes, expect the film to be chock-full of poorly placed big name celebs.
    Yeah, I can't remember a time in which I was not watching the Simpsons.

    Kusuguttai on
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    bernbaumbernbaum Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    So, reading the episode guides on Wikipedia, I place the beginning of the decline in quality of Simpsons eps at around season 9/10, although my Jump the Shark Moment would have to be the death of Maude.

    From my reckoning, this roughly coincides with the first season of Futurama. From what I'm told, David S. Cohen left the Simpsons to work on Futurama. Could this switch of creative talent be responsible for the kind of episodes they've been making since ? Futurama was, arguably, better than the Simpsons episodes that were coming out at the same time.

    bernbaum on
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    Ninja BotNinja Bot Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    That was around the time Mike Scully joined to, but I think he gets too much hate personally.

    Ninja Bot on
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    jtmorgan61jtmorgan61 Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    In retrospect I think it started to coast when conan left as head writer after season 7. The next couple of seasons were still really damn good, but starting to lose focus. I remember the egyptian museum episode being the first one I didn't laugh a single time the whole way through, which shocked me. Then the elf jockey episode ("saddlesore galactica") was immediately followed with maude's death, both of which are viscerally painful episodes to sit through. This was partway through an up and down season with a lot of clunkers, and finished me off.

    jtmorgan61 on
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    MrMisterMrMister Jesus dying on the cross in pain? Morally better than us. One has to go "all in".Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    jtmorgan61 wrote:
    I'm curious if younger posters think present-day simpsons contributes anything to the cultural dialogue other than being a sometimes amusing half hour once a week.

    My favorite line ever was:

    "Now the planes are back where they belong... flying over poor people's houses."

    MrMister on
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    bernbaumbernbaum Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    jtmorgan61 wrote:
    I remember the egyptian museum episode being the first one I didn't laugh a single time the whole way through, which shocked me.

    Yeah, I can remember when I first realised that I wasn't laughing anymore and that Simpsons-watching was just a habit that I had developed.

    Here in Australia, they broadcast an old episode prior to the weeks new episode. I was finding new jokes in episodes I'd seen a million times before, as well as finding wisdom in classic, oft-repeated dialogue. The new episode that would follow was completely devoid and just didn't compare.

    So, what other Jump the Shark moments are there ?

    bernbaum on
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    flamebroiledchickenflamebroiledchicken Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    Season 13 was the last "maybe kind of okay" season of The Simpsons, but it really hasn't been a great show since Season 10, which IMO was the last great season. Actually, even Season 13 was pretty bad. So I'd say Seasons 11-13 represent the decline, and since Season 14 it's been complete shit.

    flamebroiledchicken on
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    CambotCambot Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    I really agree with the tone of the Simpsons at its peak, is something that is long lost. When I refer to its peak I'm talking bout seasons 5-6. I'm a huge David Mirkin fan. I love Get A Life, and the style he brought to The Simpsons that has only been matched since in moments. The way they would do jokes was very unique by seeting it up reinforcing the fact that you are watching a cartoon sitcom, then the punchline would be "ah, this is how it works out in real life!" (kangaroo pouches, kissing curing a punch, etc).

    Its cultural impact on comedy in general has been diluted, just because its pacing has become the basic formula of the average sitcom today. The show actually has changed "targets" over the years, though I've never thought of the series as one to gow out of its way to aggressively have targets. Not like a series such as South park would.

    I think it became obvious by about "the Spinoff Showcase" ep, that they had pretty much taken shots at everything under the sun, and for the next few years, before anything, made fun of itself. The gags have only become more meta as the show gets older, with more in the well to dig out. Honestly, you're hard pressed to get all you can out of a 14-17 season episode, without being a hardcore fan since day one.

    Back to its "targets"; the American sitcom as we used to know it is dead, and even if they still did outdated parodies of it, it would be quite hypocritical, since I've seen quite a few awful standrad sitcom setup and delivery lines lately. Reality programs run television now anyway.
    The show has moved on though. They've done the internet more than once (Menace Shoes, Furious Yellow) and reality TV about half a dozen times, and 24 news newtorks quite a bit as well. I also have to mention the under-appreciated bit on the overabundance of CGI kids movies back in season 16; and a huge parody of all traditional X-Mas TV specials in season 15.

    As for cultural impact on society; The Cartarige Family i think is still their peak at adressing social issues. Excllent, fair, fun, and most of all true to the characters. Thats not to say they haven't made good episodes reflecting society since then (I loved the gay marriage, assisted suicide, and evolution episodes. And thats only recalling the last two seaosns), but I don't think they've ever really shown anything that has explored every side of the subject so well. The closest thing to that was the episode about Catholicism in season 16. I was raised Catholic, and the lines and subtle gags were so spot-on.

    Cambot on
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    DarkWarriorDarkWarrior __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2006
    I wouldn't mind if they changed a few things up. Doesn't have to have any major impact but you know, like someone said, make Rainier the new mayor, marry off Edna, have skinner stop being a pussy with his mom. The characters are one-note and its gotten old.

    *Skinner gets into situation*
    "Mom disapproves*
    *Skinner submits*
    LOL!

    Give Homer back his 20 IQ points.

    DarkWarrior on
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