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Going to College. (SOLVED)

ClawshrimpyClawshrimpy Registered User regular
edited September 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
I will be attending the University of Toledo in January, and, allthough I feel a little nervous talking about College plans on the internet (I've been teased before on other forums.) I thought I'd talk about it here in H&A as well.

this is what I plan on taking:

Major: Foreign Language: Japanese.

Minor: Asian Studies

Now, I have been downtrodden with crap about how "learning to speak Japanese will get me nowhere as far as a career is concerned." but that's just it, I'm not looking for work, I'm a disabled individual who is only going to college to learn new things and to have the "experience" of going to college. I've allready made peace noone will ever hire me anywhere because the barrier for a lot of employers to hire an Austism sufferer, even one with a degree, is too great.

Clawshrimpy on
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Posts

  • MonoxideMonoxide Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited September 2008
    I've allready made peace noone will ever hire me anywhere because the barrier for a lot of employers to hire an Austism sufferer, even one with a degree, is too great.

    Not with that attitude they won't.

    Monoxide on
  • jimenexjimenex Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    How disabled are you exactly?

    jimenex on
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  • EdilithEdilith Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I don't really see what help or advice you are asking for, but in my humble opinion language and culture studies are always a great choice. Being bilingual really gives you a lot of opportunities and will give you a boost in careers even if you don't specifically need to know fluent Japanese.

    May I ask why you think your Autism will deter you from ever gaining a career? You have as much chance as getting into a good career as someone who doesn't have Autism. Don't have your future ruled by it.

    Edilith on
  • frayfray Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    A degree in any language is pretty impressive, especially one as complex as Japanese. You might find it helps you in getting a job a lot more than you'd think. I can't really speak to autism being a barrier or not as I wouldn't know :/

    Were there any specific things you wanted to know or wanted advice on about going to college?

    fray on
    "I told you," said Ford. "Eddies in the space-time continuum."
    "And this is his sofa, is it?" said Arthur.
  • ClawshrimpyClawshrimpy Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    fray wrote: »
    A degree in any language is pretty impressive, especially one as complex as Japanese. You might find it helps you in getting a job a lot more than you'd think. I can't really speak to autism being a barrier or not as I wouldn't know :/

    Were there any specific things you wanted to know or wanted advice on about going to college?
    Well, my thing is, I am trying to avoid as much "complex math" as possible. I know I'm going to have to do some either way, but I really am trying to stick to something that won't wind me up in statistics or Trig or something.

    As for my Autism, I'm a sufferer of Asperger's Syndrome. I have tried to get odd jobs before, and I have been turned down, even by "Job Coach" services because I need supervision. and I think a lot of Employers don't feel comfortable with a lot of my tendencies and as a result, I just don't seem to be "on the radar." It mostly came down specifically to me having to get benefits, but at the same time, I don't like the idea of sitting at home all day. I for example, talk to myself sometimes. but I do NOT have Scizophrenia. I simply think aloud.

    Clawshrimpy on
  • iTunesIsEviliTunesIsEvil Cornfield? Cornfield.Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Not sure what H/A you're looking for exactly. Talking with an Academic Adviser would be the best bet for figuring out what you would have to take to get the degree you're wanting. Do you know where you're going to school? Have you been accepted? I'm not sure you can get out of college without Trig, but that's really not based on anything other than "a feeling."

    iTunesIsEvil on
  • ManonvonSuperockManonvonSuperock Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    a degree in jap would be useful somewhat on the west coast, but especially in hawaii or guam. you'd also be surprised at how many companies will hire handicapped individuals, because they totally get tax breaks from it.

    ManonvonSuperock on
  • EdilithEdilith Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I have a good friend who has Asperger's Syndrome who works. It shouldn't stop you getting into a career at all due to disability acts/equal opportunities. Where do you live? Maybe there are a few organisations around who could advise you more specifically.

    Edilith on
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited September 2008
    Uh, there's no question in this post. Like, at all.

    So I'll give you some general advice: Minor in Japanese. Major in something else you enjoy.

    I majored in Japanese because I wanted to learn Japanese, and I really enjoyed college and my classes and the experience of learning Japanese, but it was not the right thing to do. I should have taken a minor, and majored in something else. That is what you should do too. Majoring in a foreign language is really a terrible idea unless you have another skill lined up, because I don't care if you say you're disabled, you should still have something you can do, unless you are not high-functioning enough to leave your house.

    Do not go to college with the feeling that no one will hire you anyway so you don't have to try for a career. Pick a field you enjoy (for example, Language is not a field, but Linguistics is) with a job you think you would like to do in mind, and go for it. Speak with an adviser about it, and work from there. If you are learning-disabled or have special needs, tell them. Most public colleges will bend over backwards to work with you, because it looks very bad for them if they don't.

    A Linguistics degree should not require any math. There are social science degrees and the like. Really go through the majors offered by your school and see if you can get excited about one that might be a fit. You should be able to find the requirements for each major.

    Basically, you're spending a lot of (somebody's) money to go to college, and during that time regardless of your major you're going to have to take a whole lot of classes you don't want to or else you won't graduate. Make it count, learn something useful to a career you'd like to have while you're there, and employers will be more likely to say "Hmm.. he has this thing, but.. he was able to finish college so we'll give it a shot."

    Attitude is a large part of this equation, so you might want to consider replacing yours with one that is useful.

    ceres on
    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • Mai-KeroMai-Kero Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I'd highly recommend studying Korea instead of Japan. In addition to not being a completely insane fucked up culture of rapists that beats everyone in ethnocentrism hands down, even the US, Korea is also on the increase in terms of economic power and global influence, unlike Japan, which is on it's way out. China would work better, too.

    Mai-Kero on
  • RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I dunno, this actually seems like a pretty decent idea. I have no idea what the usual jobs for language majors are, but translation has to be up there, right? And translation (of text at least) is pretty independent work. You get a document, you translate, you submit. It seems like Asperger's might not hurt very much in that sort of job. At least your employment wouldn't depend on your ability to socialize and interact with people on a daily basis--you can just do your own thing and make sure you're translating your quota of documents or whatever.

    RUNN1NGMAN on
  • jimenexjimenex Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Mai-Kero wrote: »
    I'd highly recommend studying Korea instead of Japan. In addition to not being a completely insane fucked up culture of rapists that beats everyone in ethnocentrism hands down, even the US, Korea is also on the increase in terms of economic power and global influence, unlike Japan, which is on it's way out. China would work better, too.

    this is true.

    You could always freelance after graduating...a lot of companies always need translators and such for documents.

    However...I am of the school of thought that social diseases are cured by interacting HEAVILY with people, so college is the best decision you could make.

    jimenex on
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  • DiscoZombieDiscoZombie Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    you sound incredibly high functioning to me. better grasp of English than like 95% of the population. Of course, I don't know what you're like in person, but I mumble to myself sometimes (actually, pretty often) and I had no trouble getting a job. but I guess that's not what this thread was about. :) and besides, if you are in the position of never having to work, more power to you! I wouldn't if I didn't have to.

    I majored in a social science, and it might not have been the best choice economically, but I didn't really regret it. Let's face it - only like 10% of college majors have common practical applications. Mostly, you go to school for the experience, like you said, and for getting a better feel for how society works and stuff.

    DiscoZombie on
  • angrylinuxgeekangrylinuxgeek Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I used to work with people with Down's Syndrome at the grocery store. You can bag groceries man. Why waste the taxpayers dollars on an education you won't put to use anyway?

    edit: people with social disorders don't really fit in at college, either. though I never took a Japanese studies class, I bet there are a lot of them there.

    angrylinuxgeek on
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  • NapoleonNapoleon Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I agree with ALG

    Napoleon on
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  • Mai-KeroMai-Kero Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    From what I remember Clawshrimpy is Uriel's brother and that guy said he didn't even have asperger's, he was just an anime-loving recluse without social skills. If anything, thread-starter, you're high functioning enough to stop being so whiny and just get on with your life. Developing social skills can happen in college, so just do it, that's probably your best bet.

    Mai-Kero on
  • SeptusSeptus Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I think Uriel was kind of a dick and may have lied about that.

    Septus on
    PSN: Kurahoshi1
  • NeadenNeaden Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    If you are going to be capable of graduating college then you will be capable of finding a job. College is in a lot of ways more difficult then a lot of jobs out there.

    Neaden on
  • Minus_83Minus_83 Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2008
    I agree with Napoleon.

    Minus_83 on
  • DiscoZombieDiscoZombie Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Neaden wrote: »
    College is in a lot of ways more difficult then a lot of jobs out there.

    I will second that. I had much more trouble with college than employment.

    DiscoZombie on
  • X3x3nonX3x3non Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I used to work with people with Down's Syndrome at the grocery store. You can bag groceries man. Why waste the taxpayers dollars on an education you won't put to use anyway?

    edit: people with social disorders don't really fit in at college, either. though I never took a Japanese studies class, I bet there are a lot of them there.

    Taxpayers' money has been wasted on a lot stupider things than giving someone an education. Maybe he "knows" now he won't use it, but after 4 life changing years he will be in a different disposition. This was in my opinion just terrible "Oh look at me I am going to give you the tough treatment to turn your life around" type of advice.

    But I do agree on minoring in a language, not majoring. Whenever I think about people getting a degree in a language I always have to think about those kids who grew up bilingually when their parents moved to the US. They know two languages and cultures fluently BEFORE they even went to college to get a degree. What insights do you have into their language and culture that they didn't have at 16?
    From what I remember Clawshrimpy is Uriel's brother and that guy said he didn't even have asperger's
    Honestly guys, he is just asking for advice so cut the forum drama. We just have to take his word on the degree of his disability.

    X3x3non on
  • ClawshrimpyClawshrimpy Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    X3x3non wrote: »
    I used to work with people with Down's Syndrome at the grocery store. You can bag groceries man. Why waste the taxpayers dollars on an education you won't put to use anyway?

    edit: people with social disorders don't really fit in at college, either. though I never took a Japanese studies class, I bet there are a lot of them there.

    Taxpayers' money has been wasted on a lot stupider things than giving someone an education. Maybe he "knows" now he won't use it, but after 4 life changing years he will be in a different disposition. This was in my opinion just terrible "Oh look at me I am going to give you the tough treatment to turn your life around" type of advice.

    But I do agree on minoring in a language, not majoring. Whenever I think about people getting a degree in a language I always have to think about those kids who grew up bilingually when their parents moved to the US. They know two languages and cultures fluently BEFORE they even went to college to get a degree. What insights do you have into their language and culture that they didn't have at 16?
    From what I remember Clawshrimpy is Uriel's brother and that guy said he didn't even have asperger's
    Honestly guys, he is just asking for advice so cut the forum drama. We just have to take his word on the degree of his disability.
    I'm perfectly happy not having a job, though. I'd just at least would like to go to school. please do not drudge up the "olol you're living off of taxpayers" bullshit here. I am shooting for a grant I'm trying to save money and avoid student loans as much as possible.

    I just don't know what else I want to Major in. I just want to make sure I will become Fluent in Japanese, so I can maybe do this "Freelance Translation" you guys are talking about, If I'm gonna get work, a Freelance job out of Home might really work for me.

    Clawshrimpy on
  • mugginnsmugginns Jawsome Fresh CoastRegistered User regular
    edited September 2008
    One thing to keep in mind: if you do translation, you're going to have to talk to strangers all the time. If you're awkward and uncomfortable talking to people, you may want to choose something less social.

    mugginns on
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  • DiscoZombieDiscoZombie Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I'm perfectly happy not having a job, though.
    I would be more than perfectly happy not having a job, too, until the food ran out and I got evicted :(

    DiscoZombie on
  • ClawshrimpyClawshrimpy Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    mugginns wrote: »
    One thing to keep in mind: if you do translation, you're going to have to talk to strangers all the time. If you're awkward and uncomfortable talking to people, you may want to choose something less social.
    I can talk to people, I actually desire to fit in.

    Clawshrimpy on
  • angrylinuxgeekangrylinuxgeek Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    X3x3non wrote: »
    This was in my opinion just terrible "Oh look at me I am going to give you the tough treatment to turn your life around" type of advice.

    not really, I was just trying to be realistic since this is the help/advice forum :|

    angrylinuxgeek on
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  • jimenexjimenex Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    mugginns wrote: »
    One thing to keep in mind: if you do translation, you're going to have to talk to strangers all the time. If you're awkward and uncomfortable talking to people, you may want to choose something less social.
    I can talk to people, I actually desire to fit in.

    Then by all means go for it...Slap yourself and talk to people. You are going to college, so chances are you will meet people who are also socially "disabled". Everyone goes through a non-social period, but the problem is that now they are calling it a disease, or chemical unbalance or some shit like that.

    You might just need to get outside more, man. Go to college and force yourself to participate in social events even if you hate it at first, even if you feel awkward as hell. The worst thing you can do is bitch about it. Going to college might be the best decision you can take.

    jimenex on
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  • cloudeaglecloudeagle Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Clawshrimpy, you know who else has Asperger's Syndrome? Bill Gates. You've got a future ahead of you, so don't plan like you don't. Do something you enjoy and could see yourself doing for a long time.

    cloudeagle on
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  • ClawshrimpyClawshrimpy Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    jimenex wrote: »
    mugginns wrote: »
    One thing to keep in mind: if you do translation, you're going to have to talk to strangers all the time. If you're awkward and uncomfortable talking to people, you may want to choose something less social.
    I can talk to people, I actually desire to fit in.

    Then by all means go for it...Slap yourself and talk to people. You are going to college, so chances are you will meet people who are also socially "disabled". Everyone goes through a non-social period, but the problem is that now they are calling it a disease, or chemical unbalance or some shit like that.

    You might just need to get outside more, man. Go to college and force yourself to participate in social events even if you hate it at first, even if you feel awkward as hell. The worst thing you can do is bitch about it. Going to college might be the best decision you can take.
    I'm sorry, but It offends me greatly when people bring up the "Autism isn't real" bullshit. I was actually diagnosed by a professional. I am not like the "Self-Diagnose."

    I am trying to get out more.

    Clawshrimpy on
  • jimenexjimenex Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I was actually diagnosed by a professional

    This doesn't mean anything. You might be diagnosed as socially disabled, but my point is that it should not be a condition you scape-goat to if you can write coherently on an internet forum. Complain about me "offending" you if you can't even talk or just walk in circles all day. You seem to be trying, from what you say, so just stop mentioning the disease and do it.

    I really don't give a fuck if you go to college or not. I'm not trying to offend you. I met a lot of people in my life that were diagnosed with social disease who just said "fuck it", some by themselves, some with their parents' help, and now lead a normal life.

    Like I said, if you are coherent enough to be writing here "interacting" with people, then you can interact outside. You just need to do it.

    I really should stop using quotation marks.

    jimenex on
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  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I just want to mention that I hope you're not studying Japanese simply because of anime. I seen way too many otaku's start taking japanese classes simply because of this and failing miserably.

    Kyougu on
  • SeptusSeptus Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    jimenex wrote: »
    Like I said, if you are coherent enough to be writing here "interacting" with people, then you can interact outside. You just need to do it.

    He may be coherent enough to interact in the outside world, but his posts here aren't the proof for it. Many people who are autistic have a lot of trouble recognizing facial expressions. That's a pretty big hindrance for social interaction.

    Septus on
    PSN: Kurahoshi1
  • cloudeaglecloudeagle Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I'm sorry, but It offends me greatly when people bring up the "Autism isn't real" bullshit. I was actually diagnosed by a professional. I am not like the "Self-Diagnose."

    Woah there. You weren't diagnosed with full-blown autisim, you were diagnosed with Aspberger's Syndrome, a mild form of autism. Yes, it's a bit of a disability, but people with Aspberger's Syndrome can be perfectly functional in society. See: Bill Gates.

    It really sounds like you're holding yourself back and not really trying to find out what you can really do.

    cloudeagle on
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  • ClawshrimpyClawshrimpy Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Kyougu wrote: »
    I just want to mention that I hope you're not studying Japanese simply because of anime. I seen way too many otaku's start taking japanese classes simply because of this and failing miserably.
    Games are a big reason, too. I wouldn't mind maybe getting a job at a company like Atlus or something and translate games officially, since I can't do the ubermath for programming, and the artistic talent for modeling or making concept art.

    Clawshrimpy on
  • TheFid2TheFid2 Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    There's a guy in my college Men's Chorus with Aspberger's and yeah, he's pretty awkward and he doesn't always "get" things, but you know what? He doesn't let it get him down. He's majoring in broadcast journalism or something similar. He knows he has a long road ahead of him, but you'd never hear him say "I'm never going to get a job."

    It's all in the attitude, like others have said, and self-deprication is just going to make other people pile onto you, too. And you need to stop making excuses for yourself You're going to need to get over that before you even think about picking a major.

    There are tons of jobs in translation, though make sure this is something you could wake up every day and do, not something you want to do because you like anime.

    TheFid2 on
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  • Brodo FagginsBrodo Faggins Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Once you get to college, don't make the mistake of hiding in your room all day. Make sure you get out and do things.

    Brodo Faggins on
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  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Lots of Japanese companies in the US have openings for skilled translators. Honda is a big one. You need to be able to keep track of at least two conversations in two different languages at the same time. Basically, translators set the tempo of the meeting, whether it be inter-department conversations or executive management meetings.

    It seems crazy hard, but they're good at it. And they're very much needed.

    VeritasVR on
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  • frayfray Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    jimenex wrote: »
    I was actually diagnosed by a professional

    This doesn't mean anything.

    Uh, yes it does? Are you a professional pyschiatrist, or whatever? I didn't think so. So you and everyone else trying to second-guess whether this guy has a "real" disability need to stop. It's not helpful and it doesn't count as advice in my book. This is the internet; you don't know anything about the man other than what little he's chosen to tell you, and the impression you've formed of him based on that is probably wrong.

    Which isn't to say, Clawshrimpy, that trying to get out and socialise with other people isn't a better idea than staying in your room all day. With practice it does get easier. And yeah, maybe putting more thought into what exactly you want to do at college and how it's going to help you get a career. But if majoring in Japanese is definitely what you want to do then go for it.

    fray on
    "I told you," said Ford. "Eddies in the space-time continuum."
    "And this is his sofa, is it?" said Arthur.
  • ShogunShogun Hair long; money long; me and broke wizards we don't get along Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I think Ceres' idea of a linguistics major is actually a rather good idea. OP how interested are you in language as a whole? For example if you were willing to learn japanese, korean, and mandarin chinese you could actually have an incredibly successful future ahead of you. Not to mention getting an opportunity to go all over the world and work with different companies in different fields. And from there you can go even higher. Get into a good professional MBA program, or go to law school. Granted I am thinking very far ahead, but language (especially those three) could take you incredibly far in the near future.

    Shogun on
  • descoladadescolada Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Hi, I also graduated with a Japanese major.

    It is indeed true that language skills can open up your options, but majoring specifically in a language can be limiting to some extent. While I don't really regret what I did (I studied something I love and ran with it), I recognize that I might have been more diversified had I simply minored in it and chosen a broader major.

    Written translation is indeed a valid path for a language major, but it can be very dull work. Spoken interpretation is, like, fifty hojillion times harder and requires far higher fluency than can be gained through a four year degree program.

    By all means, plan on taking your first two years of Japanese early on and see how it goes. But, if you don't love it to death before that third year, I would seriously consider switching it to a minor. Most people who are in it for the wrong reasons will wise up by this point, but I did see some hardcore otaku types make it to their fourth year, only to realize at the last minute that they secretly hate Japanese and don't know what they're going to do after graduation.

    descolada on
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