Options

My son discovers RPGs, or How I Realized I’m A Jaded Gamer

2456710

Posts

  • Options
    urahonkyurahonky Cynical Old Man Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Xaquin wrote: »
    Ganluan wrote: »
    I know what you mean, I wish I could go back to the feeling I had when I first played Everquest back at launch. You can never capture the feeling of awe and wonder in another MMO after your first, because you see them all in the same basic terms.

    amen

    Agreed. Man... When you first dive into your first MMO... It's so incredible. I just wish I can get that feeling back again.

    (Played the beta for DaoC and I was shitting myself at how huge the world was)

    urahonky on
  • Options
    TritonTriton Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I liked your story. It's fun to think about as someone who one day wants kids.

    All this is though is the reality of growing up and learning more about the realities of our world. Your son will look back in the same way when he is your age, thinking about the great times he had with the games you are providing for him now and how he can't recapture the childhood magic. Everyone grows up, enjoy it while it lasts!

    Triton on
    I like to make games.
    Personal Site - http://www.guilezero.com
    Blog - http://www.gmixer.com
  • Options
    rayofashrayofash Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Zerokku wrote: »
    This thread depresses me. If only because I havn't had that feeling in so long.

    The last RPG that got me like that was Lunar: Silver Star Story, and only because I didn't have to do that much grinding and the story moved fast. But then it pulled that same trick that all JRPGs do at the end: You're at the boss, and there's no going back, even if you don't have enough healing items. Didn't have a save game before entering the tower? Too bad, you'll have to start the game all over again.

    None of these american RPGs have ever been able to pull me into them, although I do love the Ultima series it never actually pulled me into it.

    The last MMO I had this experience with was Tibia, me and my friends on Rookguard exploring the island together. I'd actually keep a journal of our adventures, and they were amazing. Then we got onto the mainland and someone taught me about all the game mechanics, and it was just a pointless grind from there. I somehow managed to stay with that game off and on for 8 years though, and I do have a collection of historic events on the main server and was there when a lot of them happened.

    rayofash on
  • Options
    deowolfdeowolf is allowed to do that. Traffic.Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Triton wrote: »
    I liked your story. It's fun to think about as someone who one day wants kids.

    All this is though is the reality of growing up and learning more about the realities of our world. Your son will look back in the same way when he is your age, thinking about the great times he had with the games you are providing for him now and how he can't recapture the childhood magic. Everyone grows up, enjoy it while it lasts!

    Either that or he'll shank what would have been the winning kick in Super Bowl LVIII and blame you for not making him go outside and practice more.

    This is a secret fear I harbor about my daughter.

    deowolf on
    [SIGPIC]acocoSig.jpg[/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    manwiththemachinegunmanwiththemachinegun METAL GEAR?! Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    The main reason I'm looking forward to Far Cry 2 is being able to dish out some digital vengeance on the scum of Africa. Darfur is appalling, but its routine so far as African wars are concerned. Nazis are bad, but in many ways theses guys are worse. Some of the most horrendous abuses of children, women, non-combatants, that's just routine.
    Like guys who take bets, gut women and win/lose based on whether she's pregnant or not, and then BRAG about it. Forcing VICTIMS to kill and torture other victims to survive, and pretty much the whole gambit of gang rape, impalement, and brain washing kids to kill others. That's in addition to good old mass killings.

    http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/africa/06/19/koinange.africa/index.html

    If you've seen blood diamond, that's just the tip of the iceburg.

    Basically, the UN hasn't done jack and no one cares enough give these people what they really need. It's not food, it's mercs, troops, and guns so they can put these murdering assholes down for good. Some people in the world just need to die, and these guys qualify. And if you think there's ever going to be a peaceful, 'diplomatic' solution to that problem, you're living in la-la land.

    It may not happen in real life, but damn it I'm sure as hell going to do it in a videogame. These guys deserve all the bad press they can get.

    manwiththemachinegun on
  • Options
    MrMonroeMrMonroe passed out on the floor nowRegistered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I don't know if I've ever felt like that.

    When I was young enough to really believe in a story, the biggest plot twist available to me was
    Seriously, it's a big spoiler.
    If you haven't played it you're going to hate me.
    "The Princess is in another castle!"

    EDIT: Okay, Mass Effect kinda had this impact on me the first run-through, even if I was really "acting" as I did it. I'm of the method acting school, what can I say? I was playing someone that ended up being mostly renegade, so I was used to seeing "+2 Renegade" when I ended a dialog, but there was that weird little side quest where you're supposed to get some drugs for this human negotiator and my immediate response from the point of view of the character was "what? Eat a dick, druggie," and when the dialog ended I got a "+2 Paragon." An oddly meta moment, and now, realizing it, I'm thinking they shouldn't have ever told you whether you were getting Paragon or Renegade points, and just let them accumulate invisibly to keep the illusion going.

    Edit again: oh shit now I have to go play Mass Effect. later.

    MrMonroe on
  • Options
    JubehJubeh Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    There are still a few games that make me feel like that, though it's kind of embarrassing around company. If I get really absorbed, I'll start screaming and stuff. Like the first time I played Shadow of the Colossus everything I fell I'd freak out, and as I was climbing I made pseudo-grunting noises.

    But, you know, that's really rare.

    I wish I was a kid again. ):

    Jubeh on
  • Options
    DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    My playthroughs of Shadow of the Colossus require me to get fruit and lizards for Wander to eat after a few fights, to keep his strength up. He also takes short breaks and lets Agro graze, but before long he remembers why he's doing this and forces himself to keep going, despite his growing exhaustion.

    DarkPrimus on
  • Options
    ImpersonatorImpersonator Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    I felt like this when playing Half-Life 2... I really felt that I was there... That atmosphere, the characters, everything seemed so real and I genuinely felt as though I was also a character in that particular world, I would even feel anger or sadness depending on the situation, it was really strange as I did not feel like that in a long, long time :)

    Impersonator on
  • Options
    GSMGSM Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    DarkPrimus wrote: »
    My playthroughs of Shadow of the Colossus require me to get fruit and lizards for Wander to eat after a few fights, to keep his strength up. He also takes short breaks and lets Agro graze, but before long he remembers why he's doing this and forces himself to keep going, despite his growing exhaustion.

    My first and only playthrough of SOTC (funny story: borrowed game on a borrowed console) involved no lizards or fruit. For me, it was a game of monomania, and unrelenting obsession. And then...
    I accidentally read half of a spoiler that lead me to believe Argo was going to die (for good). And at the same time I found out you could pet Argo. And I really felt bad about having pushed him through the entire story to the point he would die for my suddenly selfish quest without being nice to him. It was regret, I guess. Simulated regret.

    Guessing that the sidequest was a trap was a good strategy, which also shows greater creativity than modern game designers can afford, what with expectations that every real story decision splinter game experience towards different ends. I've been writing on that topic for a bit, and I think I need to put it all together sometime. It's a pretty complete thesis on game story design that would sidestep a lot of the economic problems with divergent stories having to mean making the same game so many different ways.

    GSM on
    We'll get back there someday.
  • Options
    JediNightJediNight Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    I think that "loss of wonder" in games/MMOs nowadays is rather sad. Like someone mentioned on the first page -- I remember exploring Everquest and some of the early expansions when they first came out, and it was so neat trying to discover everything.

    It took people like 9 months to even discover the Kedge Keep zone. Or how to get out to Temple of Veeshan in Velious, etc. Everything was new and exciting and there was that sense of fear of the unknown that was great.

    Nowadays everything is data-mined before it even comes out, and people scour map viewers for all the little details etc. You get yelled at and called a "noob" if you haven't spoiled every last little detail about an area before ever stepping foot in it, etc.

    Makes me sad :(

    JediNight on
  • Options
    Raiden333Raiden333 Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Maybe it's just because I wear my heart on my sleeve, but in any RPG where you're given a choice how you want to treat people, like Fallout, PS: Torment, Mass Effect, etc., I have a lot of trouble breaking out of my real-life personality. I know I'm talking to a script, but I can't choose the mean dialog responses because I don't want to be a dick. It's really weird, I've never been able to successfully play as an evil character before, at least without getting halfway through the game and trying to 'redeem' myself.

    What's even weirder is that when I used to play WoW, I treated other real players worse than I treat NPCs in single player RPGs, except for my guild. Probably because I always saw that more as a game and less as playing a character in a story.

    Raiden333 on
    There was a steam sig here. It's gone now.
  • Options
    NocrenNocren Lt Futz, Back in Action North CarolinaRegistered User regular
    edited October 2008
    JediNight wrote: »
    I think that "loss of wonder" in games/MMOs nowadays is rather sad. Like someone mentioned on the first page -- I remember exploring Everquest and some of the early expansions when they first came out, and it was so neat trying to discover everything.

    It took people like 9 months to even discover the Kedge Keep zone. Or how to get out to Temple of Veeshan in Velious, etc. Everything was new and exciting and there was that sense of fear of the unknown that was great.

    Nowadays everything is data-mined before it even comes out, and people scour map viewers for all the little details etc. You get yelled at and called a "noob" if you haven't spoiled every last little detail about an area before ever stepping foot in it, etc.

    Makes me sad :(

    This and getting blasted for actually RPing on an RP server are the reasons I never renewed my WoW subscription. I just wanted to go in and be a solitary orc Blademaster and I jumped into the game without knowing anything.

    Nocren on
    newSig.jpg
  • Options
    PataPata Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    I can still suspend my disbelief like that kid.

    Do I win? :P

    Seriously, once I leave the game I realize the mechanics and tropes behind it, but while I'm playing I'm immersed.

    Pata on
    SRWWSig.pngEpisode 5: Mecha-World, Mecha-nisim, Mecha-beasts
  • Options
    brynstarbrynstar Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    That was a wonderful story, thank you for sharing! I too have been drawn into games less and less as I've aged, always searching for that one that would pull me in again. Perhaps the problem lies with me, not the games.

    brynstar on
    Xbox Live: Xander51
    PSN ID : Xander51 Steam ID : Xander51
  • Options
    Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Shoegaze99 wrote: »
    Luq wrote: »
    Shoegaze you articulated perfectly a problem that I have playing games and have had for a while. I am far to cognizant of the rules. I can see the framework, I see the designers intent, the experience is transparent. I too wish I could go back. I do look forward to playing with my kids someday
    EXACTLY. I mean, I still love the hell out of games (obviously) and am unlikely to ever not be a gamer, but it's different now. I don't experience them in the same way I used to when, for instance, I explored the worlds of Phantasy Star for the first time. They're no longer magic windows into other worlds because I can see all the parts moving.

    I will consider the video idea. At the very least, I'll for sure detail his reaction to KOTOR's twist. Hell, I'm looking forward to that like crazy, because I just know it's going to blow his mind. He's truly trying to be the most noble Jedi possible, being the best good guy he can, so when the twist comes ... BOOM.

    Which is only going to make the response that much more funny when the kid goes 'Jeez! No duh!'.

    I myself usually play RPGs without any specific preconceptions. At least the first time... Stuff like KOTOR or Mass Effect I'll playthrough (As a good guy... The first time anyway) and just try to enjoy the environments and writing and such. It'll never be that way again, but subsequent playthroughs, even if I'm power leveling, can still evoke memories of that first try.

    Santa Claustrophobia on
  • Options
    Ultros64Ultros64 Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Nocren wrote: »
    JediNight wrote: »
    I think that "loss of wonder" in games/MMOs nowadays is rather sad. Like someone mentioned on the first page -- I remember exploring Everquest and some of the early expansions when they first came out, and it was so neat trying to discover everything.

    It took people like 9 months to even discover the Kedge Keep zone. Or how to get out to Temple of Veeshan in Velious, etc. Everything was new and exciting and there was that sense of fear of the unknown that was great.

    Nowadays everything is data-mined before it even comes out, and people scour map viewers for all the little details etc. You get yelled at and called a "noob" if you haven't spoiled every last little detail about an area before ever stepping foot in it, etc.

    Makes me sad :(

    This and getting blasted for actually RPing on an RP server are the reasons I never renewed my WoW subscription. I just wanted to go in and be a solitary orc Blademaster and I jumped into the game without knowing anything.

    Man, I couldn't lime this any harder. I originally had a character on Darkspear (a PvP server), got him up to 70, and then immediately went to Steamwheedle because I thought that it would offer me something more in-depth than just being a 70 Mage. My character could have a backstory, or have an actual face beyond totting around the exact same gear that every other high-end mage had. Hell, I even made entire characters with gimmicks. For example, I had a character named Grallin the Mad who would go into the middle of Stormwind and give absolutely insane prophecies that were tied in riddles and analogies. First person to actually figure out what my prophecy was about would get a neatly tied red ribbon package. To be honest, most of the packages contained weird things (a ham, a broom with fiery, etc etc.), but every now and then they'd actually contain something of value (Eye of the Flame, some other epic).

    And to be honest, that was the most fun I'd ever had playing WoW - just my crazy ass rambling IC in the middle of Stormwind about how the green sleeping bag was ruffling the featherless ice eaters. Y'know, the normal stuff. :lol:

    Ultros64 on
    It doesn't matter what I say, as long as I sing with inflection
  • Options
    Asamof the HorribleAsamof the Horrible Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    I can still occasionally get immersed into a gameworld

    Shadow of the Colossus and Bioshock (first hour or so) are more recent examples

    but EQ1 was an incredible experience back in the day. Danger around every corner when you're an iksar shadowknight, and the joys of sneaking around with invisibility spells. Intense shit right there considering the death penalty

    Asamof the Horrible on
  • Options
    TylerbroorTylerbroor Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    That's a fantastic age to be playing RPGs. Final Fantasy 7 came out when I was 9, and I haven't forgotten the experience. Total immersion, total willingness to jump into the characters and the stereotypes that surround them, and total ignorance to 'gaming conventions' I.E. a boss battle at the end of every dungeon, hidden characters.

    Having no preconception of the Japanese emo-hero/past RPG characters, I thought that Cloud was fucking cool. I thought everyone was cool. It's my opinion that this connection a kid of that age can have with a game is why Final Fantasy 6/7/9/etc battles occur with such tenacity and repetition. It was my first game, and I felt like I was inside a novel. When I hear people knocking it, it's personal.

    Trying to make the voyage from Qeynos to Freeport on foot with my best friend one saturday morning was probably one of the most memorable experiences I've ever had while gaming. It wasn't about grinding, or preordained questing, or guild meetings. My friend and I were just checking shit out in a dangerous world.

    It is sort of sad how I play games now. I just chew them up, spit them out, and move on. Pretty cold.

    Tylerbroor on
  • Options
    Ultros64Ultros64 Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Tylerbroor wrote: »
    It is sort of sad how I play games now. I just chew them up, spit them out, and move on. Pretty cold.

    You know, I think I'm starting to go the same way. A good example of this was when I was at the last part of Metal Gear Solid 4 a few days ago, when you are
    fist-fighting Liquid Ocelot on the top of that ship

    and all I could do was poke fun at the small things. I'd been doing that throughout a good portion of the game, and I hadn't really second-guessed any of it. Instead of just enjoying the damn thing, I was making fun of what is, essentially, one of the more well-crafted games of this console generation.

    But when I remember playing Metal Gear Solid for the first time when I was 11, man I was engrossed. I was totally into it, totally into not just being some slightly overweight kid on a beanbag chair, but I *was* Solid Snake, crawling through air ducts, hiding in cardboard boxes, hitting on vastly underage Asian women. And things that were big points in the story, like
    when Meryl is shot by Sniper Wolf and you have to watch her bleed while she tells you to leave her behind

    caused legitimate and fervent anger in myself.

    Now granted, I'm older now. But I'd like to get back to that point where I can play a game and love it for the atmosphere and story again. I'm hoping Fable 2 might do this for me, or Fallout, or something. Anything at this point.

    Ultros64 on
    It doesn't matter what I say, as long as I sing with inflection
  • Options
    METAzraeLMETAzraeL Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    Honestly this whole thing is one reason I hate dying, repetition, and mostly required secrets. They take me out of the game and remind me it's game. This affects me to lesser or greater degrees depending on the game. Basically I don't want to ever have to think about my actions in the context of the game. If the game has a "wrong" way to play it, it's not a game I'll generally enjoy for long.
    Cut scenes have been really bothering me lately, since they absolutely ruin any feelings of immersion that I have.

    I can't really think of ever being totally into a game this much, though.

    METAzraeL on

    dream a little dream or you could live a little dream
    sleep forever if you wish to be a dreamer
  • Options
    Raiden333Raiden333 Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    METAzraeL wrote: »
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    Honestly this whole thing is one reason I hate dying, repetition, and mostly required secrets. They take me out of the game and remind me it's game. This affects me to lesser or greater degrees depending on the game. Basically I don't want to ever have to think about my actions in the context of the game. If the game has a "wrong" way to play it, it's not a game I'll generally enjoy for long.
    Cut scenes have been really bothering me lately, since they absolutely ruin any feelings of immersion that I have.

    I can't really think of ever being totally into a game this much, though.

    I have to disagree on the cutscene point. Half Life 2 for example, when I'm in one of the psuedo-cutscenes where there's people talking for a long time but I can move around, I usually grab random things and throw them at people's heads for something to do. If I don't have anything to do but lay back and sip my drink, I pay more attention.

    Raiden333 on
    There was a steam sig here. It's gone now.
  • Options
    HtownHtown Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Here's the first step:

    Stop playing games like a reviewer.

    When you pick up a game and put it in your console, just play the game. Don't go into the game thinking about review scores or what people say online. Don't even try to figure out whether the game is good or not. Just play the game.

    If you enjoy it or don't enjoy it, THEN think about what you like or don't like about it. Don't go down the checklist in your head as you play. "Graphics - 8, Sound -7, Controls, etc." Just play the game. Don't think about the developer or how it compares to other versions of the game or whatever.

    And by all means, don't think about what you're going to post about the game later on a message board. Just play the game.

    Htown on
    steam_sig.png
  • Options
    METAzraeLMETAzraeL Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Raiden333 wrote: »
    METAzraeL wrote: »
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    Honestly this whole thing is one reason I hate dying, repetition, and mostly required secrets. They take me out of the game and remind me it's game. This affects me to lesser or greater degrees depending on the game. Basically I don't want to ever have to think about my actions in the context of the game. If the game has a "wrong" way to play it, it's not a game I'll generally enjoy for long.
    Cut scenes have been really bothering me lately, since they absolutely ruin any feelings of immersion that I have.

    I can't really think of ever being totally into a game this much, though.

    I have to disagree on the cutscene point. Half Life 2 for example, when I'm in one of the psuedo-cutscenes where there's people talking for a long time but I can move around, I usually grab random things and throw them at people's heads for something to do. If I don't have anything to do but lay back and sip my drink, I pay more attention.
    I meant more of the "takes complete control away from you as you watch your character do something 'badass'" type of cutscene. For instance, walking into a boss room triggers a cinematic of it entering, instead of letting you see it all from the same viewpoint and look at what interests you.

    What you described is more along the lines of what it should be.

    METAzraeL on

    dream a little dream or you could live a little dream
    sleep forever if you wish to be a dreamer
  • Options
    ReznikReznik Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Tylerbroor wrote: »
    That's a fantastic age to be playing RPGs. Final Fantasy 7 came out when I was 9, and I haven't forgotten the experience. Total immersion, total willingness to jump into the characters and the stereotypes that surround them, and total ignorance to 'gaming conventions' I.E. a boss battle at the end of every dungeon, hidden characters.

    Having no preconception of the Japanese emo-hero/past RPG characters, I thought that Cloud was fucking cool. I thought everyone was cool. It's my opinion that this connection a kid of that age can have with a game is why Final Fantasy 6/7/9/etc battles occur with such tenacity and repetition. It was my first game, and I felt like I was inside a novel. When I hear people knocking it, it's personal.

    This is exactly me. I goddamn love FF7 and I know it's mostly nostalgia talking but honestly, the second Squeenix releases a PS3 remake I will hand them my money for like the twelfth time because I want to be 8 again and playing it for the first time and not having everyone go all 'ololol clouds is teh emo' (Cloud isn't emo, you fucks, it's Squall!) I mean, shit, I know it's a tired convention now but the first time I saw Aeris die? That was some powerful stuff. Up until then, video games for me had been Mario and Sonic and Crash Bandicoot. FF7 was serious business and I love(d) it for that.

    There are a few solid games that can still come close to that feeling I had when I played FF7 for the first time. SotC, for one. That game is simply art. They can convey so much just through animation.

    KotoR pulled me right in, too. It was the first BioWare game I played so I didn't go 'olol bioware convo choices' the first time I played it. Mass Effect came close (my jaw dropped when I zoomed out in the galaxy map for the first time), but it still maintained a lot of the same structure as KotoR so that kinda stood out.

    OP: Getting your kid to play KotoR is like the best thing ever. hi5.

    Reznik on
    Do... Re.... Mi... Ti... La...
    Do... Re... Mi... So... Fa.... Do... Re.... Do...
    Forget it...
  • Options
    ghost_master2000ghost_master2000 Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Burtletoy wrote: »
    I think that the answer is drugs.

    This. It may be temporary but you definitely get that feeling again, at least I do, under the influence.

    ghost_master2000 on
  • Options
    MongerMonger I got the ham stink. Dallas, TXRegistered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Htown wrote: »
    Here's the first step:

    Stop playing games like a reviewer.

    When you pick up a game and put it in your console, just play the game. Don't go into the game thinking about review scores or what people say online. Don't even try to figure out whether the game is good or not. Just play the game.

    If you enjoy it or don't enjoy it, THEN think about what you like or don't like about it. Don't go down the checklist in your head as you play. "Graphics - 8, Sound -7, Controls, etc." Just play the game. Don't think about the developer or how it compares to other versions of the game or whatever.

    And by all means, don't think about what you're going to post about the game later on a message board. Just play the game.
    Could just be me, but I can't not do that. I can still be engrossed, but if a game isn't expressing itself to me clearly, I have to take notice of it. It's a compulsion, not unlike furious masturbation or frowning at puppies.

    Monger on
  • Options
    ZaceZace Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    For me, I think it slighty has to do with the Gamerscore/Trophy systems. I can't help but play a game now without keeping in Mind how to get the most Gamerpoints in one playthrough.

    Zace on
  • Options
    MikestaMikesta Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Man, my brother and I were discussing this the other night. It's like you're Neo in the shitty Matrix sequels, and you can see the code behind the facade.

    Mikesta on
    untitled.jpg

    You mess with the dolphin, you get the nose.
  • Options
    SirUltimosSirUltimos Don't talk, Rusty. Just paint. Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    What an awesome, awesome thread.

    The last time this happened to me was during Half-Life 2. Right at the beginning when you're running from the Combine across the roofs. It didn't that it was mid day, and there were people around me being noisy, I was immersed. I wasn't running because I knew the game was making me, or because I knew it was the only way to advance. I was running because if I didn't, they would get me. If I didn't run they would catch up with me and do horrible things to me. For a small time, it felt like I was actually running for my life.

    The only thing that ruined it was that I said to myself during that scene "Holy crap, I'm really into this". That pulled me out for a second, but then I went right back in,

    I remember something similar during the first Metroid Prime. I had been playing the game for something like 7 hours, so god dammit I was Samus Aran. I remember dodging around bosses shots and actually moving my body. I was sitting there on my bed actually trying to dodge these shots and not be hit.

    Finally, Final Fantasy 7:
    I was a lot younger when I played it, and it wasn't actually the death of Aeris that got me. I got that spoiled for me. What really got me was the deaths of Jessie, Biggs, and Wedge. I totally didn't expect the plate to come crashing down on them.

    I remember even going up the tower. Seeing Biggs leaning against the rail wounded from all the fighting. And Wedge having fallen and Jessie in just as bad a shape. They felt like they were actually my friends and we were all fighting together. They were giving it their all and it was up to me to continue the fight for them. My young self was even pretending to ask them "Oh my god, are you okay? Are you gonna be alright?". I was concerned for the safety of these little polygonal characters and I didn't like seeing them hurt because Shinra were a bunch of evil dicks and going to kill everyone.

    Then when the plate came down I actually felt sad. Those bastards had killed my friends. They were going to fucking pay.

    Dear god, what I wouldn't give to get these feelings back.

    SirUltimos on
  • Options
    DragkoniasDragkonias That Guy Who Does Stuff You Know, There. Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    You know...I know exactly what you mean.

    You talking about your son's first RP reminded me of the first RP I ever played. At can't remember the name at the moment but I remember when I first played it how first and great everything was to me. I'd never played a game like that, haven't only mostly played platformers as a kid, and the exploration and mythology around the world really got to me.

    I could remember how I enjoyed every moment of it, how I would talk to every person and search every inch of the world map just so I wouldn't miss anything. How when I was younger I could go through a game story I would think is pretty generic by today's standards and just be engrossed by it, so much so that I paid full attention to every cutscene, FMV, etc.

    But now it's all become somewhat mechanical to me. I don't bother speaking to anyone who doesn't have anything important to say, I'm always looking for online strategy guides so I'll know where all the secret stuff is without having to look to hard for them...and I've been playing them for so long most of the challenge I used to get from the battles are pretty easy.

    That isn't to say I still don't enjoy games(it's my main hobby), I've just been playing them for so long that I don't get the same feeling I had with them as a kid.

    Dragkonias on
  • Options
    UnbreakableVowUnbreakableVow Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    The first and last time I ever remember feeling that sense of amazement with a game was Final Fantasy VII. In fact, I still kinda get it, booting it up now even eleven years later. I just get a certain "feeling" that I'm doing something special when I play it.

    UnbreakableVow on
  • Options
    RockyRocky Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    This is how I remember feeling when i played ff7 and ff8 back in the day on the pc, I was alot younger then and how I wish i could feel immersed in a game.

    And despite being embarresed saying this, I felt like that the first time i played runescape (i was a young teenager maybe and it still had 2d graphics, was also my first mmo).

    And now, just now, a flashback of Starwars galaxies, o my god, my zabrak was so cool making droids for mon cal doctors who would buy them out of pity (they were only mouse droids with a jawa display)

    Edit: not to mention the first time i read The Hobbit, i will never experience that ever again. nowadays everytime i do something my mind wonders and i end up thinking about something irrelevant.

    Rocky on
    LOTRO: Hurindar Halimhar
    GW2: Hurindar
  • Options
    override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Oy I know what you guys are talking about.

    I remember when I used to play fallout a decade ago, how just amazing it was and how deep the world was. I didn't know about stats or any minmaxing. Sure the game was alot harder running around as a science/speech/unarmed character with 4 endurance, but by god ignorance is bliss.

    I'm playing through a game today, and though the specifics of most missions have faded from memory, I run into a guy who has power armor, I have to fix it. So I need a servo, I walk upstairs to the guy that has a servo and he won't let me in his office. Now my old self would have concluded that sneak would be the way past or something, me I just instictively enter combat and walk past him while in combat mode, loot the locker, and run out.

    I didn't even think about doing these things, or know it was what I was suppose to do, but there's a point where once you understand the nuts and bolts of a game well enough the magic is kind of lost


    Don't get me wrong, I still love playing rpgs. I just wanna go back to the days when my brain didn't automatically try to munchkinize any character I play in an rpg. Where I could play an MMO without agonizing over how a piece of gear I'm wearing has a stat that does nothing for me. I mean if I'm not playing the best optimized spec in WoW or WAR it really bugs the hell out of me. Back when I first played UO I started as a lumberjack/fletcher/musicianship. All I wanted to do was chop trees while playing a flute, now I'm going over spreadsheets. What happened to me

    I still have that with strategy games, which is probably why I end up playing on easy and staying away from online play.

    override367 on
  • Options
    ShamusShamus Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    MrMonroe wrote: »
    I don't know if I've ever felt like that.

    When I was young enough to really believe in a story, the biggest plot twist available to me was
    Seriously, it's a big spoiler.
    If you haven't played it you're going to hate me.
    "The Princess is in another castle!"

    EDIT: Okay, Mass Effect kinda had this impact on me the first run-through, even if I was really "acting" as I did it. I'm of the method acting school, what can I say? I was playing someone that ended up being mostly renegade, so I was used to seeing "+2 Renegade" when I ended a dialog, but there was that weird little side quest where you're supposed to get some drugs for this human negotiator and my immediate response from the point of view of the character was "what? Eat a dick, druggie," and when the dialog ended I got a "+2 Paragon." An oddly meta moment, and now, realizing it, I'm thinking they shouldn't have ever told you whether you were getting Paragon or Renegade points, and just let them accumulate invisibly to keep the illusion going.

    Edit again: oh shit now I have to go play Mass Effect. later.

    Mass Effect really drew me in.
    On Virmire, where you have to choose between Ashley and Kaidan. I never used either in the game, I was more fond of the aliens. Ashley wasn't my love interest, but I decided to go with her because I found her less annoying then Kaidan.

    After he died, I found myself hating Ashley, blaming her that I chose to rescue her over Kaidan, because of her own ineptitude. For the rest of the game, I felt bad about leaving Kaidan behind.

    Shamus on
  • Options
    NocrenNocren Lt Futz, Back in Action North CarolinaRegistered User regular
    edited October 2008
    To chime in here... I guess I'm lucky that I still get to enjoy games for a bit. At least on the first play through. What sucks is that my first play through on ME was lost so I have to replay with a similar John Shepard for ME2. But it's not the same as the first time. (Though as an aside, I LOVE the fact that because I have the achievements unlocked, I can start with all the bonuses even without the save game.)

    But going back to the other games mentioned, I never saw the twist coming in Kotor 1 or 2 because I was so drawn into the story. I picked my levels and abilities based on what I want and not a guide and my choices were based on what I would do in the character's situation.

    Kotor-spoiler related story
    Funny thing though... I never figured out that I was Revan until AFTER the cutscene because I was so used to seeing the back of my character's head I forgot what she looked like when she took the mask off.

    Nocren on
    newSig.jpg
  • Options
    KainyKainy Pimpin' and righteous Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Honestly, I kind of got the same feeling while playing Ar Tonelico. Diluted, but still.

    While playing through it, I actually gave a rat's ass about the choices I was making in the game. Like, not for how they would mechanically affect things in the RPG, like which girl would get more magic or whatever, I genuinely started to care about what I was doing, and what dialogue I was picking, as though the characters would have real reactions, as though they were real. At the same time, I saw how ridiculous this was, and saw the game for what it was, but yeah... I had that feeling like it mattered, which was awesome.

    I put 46 hours into that game in 4 days or so.

    I'm looking forward to the next game that does it for me.

    Kainy on
    IcyLiquid wrote: »
    There's anti-fuckery code in there now :) Sorry :)
  • Options
    cj iwakuracj iwakura The Rhythm Regent Bears The Name FreedomRegistered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Ar Tonelico II, maybe?

    The first wasn't amazing, but it was good enough that I'll definitely give the sequel a try.

    Especially in terms of music and the battle system(easy, but fun).

    cj iwakura on
    wVEsyIc.png
  • Options
    RockyRocky Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    When i first played Baldurs gate 2, it was something new (this was like a year ago) even though i've played NWN and KOTOR baldurs gate was just something different, but that diden't last long as i never played more then 4 hours maybe.

    Rocky on
    LOTRO: Hurindar Halimhar
    GW2: Hurindar
  • Options
    NocrenNocren Lt Futz, Back in Action North CarolinaRegistered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Kainy wrote: »
    Honestly, I kind of got the same feeling while playing Ar Tonelico. Diluted, but still.

    While playing through it, I actually gave a rat's ass about the choices I was making in the game. Like, not for how they would mechanically affect things in the RPG, like which girl would get more magic or whatever, I genuinely started to care about what I was doing, and what dialogue I was picking, as though the characters would have real reactions, as though they were real. At the same time, I saw how ridiculous this was, and saw the game for what it was, but yeah... I had that feeling like it mattered, which was awesome.

    I put 46 hours into that game in 4 days or so.

    I'm looking forward to the next game that does it for me.

    Heh... I was kinda the same way for about the first... 30 hours of Persona 3.

    Nocren on
    newSig.jpg
Sign In or Register to comment.