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Buying a New Car

silence1186silence1186 Character shields down!As a wingmanRegistered User regular
edited November 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
So, I'm going to be buying a new car in the 20k-25k range in the near future (within the month, likely) and I was wondering what was all the rage with the kids these days?

I'm basically looking for something low maintenance, low gas costs, don't need frequent repairs, etc.

In addition to recommendations, any advice on researching a new car?

Much appreciated.

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    PeregrineFalconPeregrineFalcon Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    So, I'm going to be buying a new car in the 20k-25k range in the near future (within the month, likely) and I was wondering what was all the rage with the kids these days?

    I'm basically looking for something low maintenance, low gas costs, don't need frequent repairs, etc.

    In addition to recommendations, any advice on researching a new car?

    Much appreciated.

    10 Steps to Finding the Right Car for You

    This is just a jumping-off point, since you haven't been real specific about what kind of car you want besides "economical and runs" :P tl;dr is we need answers to:

    How many people do you need to transport?
    What kind of driving do you most often do?
    How long is your commute?
    Is it important that your next vehicle get good gas mileage?
    Do you want a manual or automatic transmission?
    Do you need four-wheel drive or all-wheel drive?
    What safety features do you want?
    Do you require a lot of cargo-carrying capacity?
    Will you be doing any towing?
    Will the car easily fit in your garage or parking area?

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    taerictaeric Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    First question you definitely need to be confronted with. If you have already addressed this, no worries.

    Make sure you understand why you want a new car! I do not recall the percentage, but the VAST majority of the value of the car goes out the window as soon as you buy it. It is so bad they have to have a special insurance that you have to purchase otherwise if you totalled it on the way home, you would not be able to afford to replace it with the money from insurance.

    taeric on
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    MishraMishra Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    I've been very happy with My Subaru Legacy. I've never had issues other than needing to mill down the break rotors, and the radio occasionally turning on the CD player. It gets great mileage, 35-25 and is pretty zippy, 168 HPW. Mines actually a PZEV(Partial Zero Emissions Vehicle) which means I only have 163 HPW but have an extra catalitic converter that makes it produces lower emissions than a Prius.

    My advice on buying a new car is get a spreadsheet to calculate how much you're going to pay, and research the snot out of it. Don't get a loan based on your monthly payments. Remeber longer loans result in more money out of your pocket.

    Mishra on
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    bfickybficky Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    In October '05, my wife and I were in the same boat, looking to spend around 20-25K on a new '06 4 door sedan. We narrowed our search to the mid-size foreign players: Toyota Camry, Nissan Ultima, Mazda 6, Honda Accord. Which one did we end up with?

    A Hyundai Sonata.

    We both really liked the way it drove, the safety rating was the best of the bunch, and we were able to get a lot more for our money than the others. Spending what we would have spent on the base model (maybe 1 or 2 upgrades) of any of the others, we got our Sonata fully loaded with leather, sun roof, and 6-CD changer. The standard warranty is 5 year bumper to bumper and 10 year powertrain, but for $995 extra we upgraded the warranty to 10 year bumper to bumper.

    In three years, we've had two minor mechanical issues (first time, the back right window stopped responding to the back right switch [driver could still roll it down]; second time, drivers side automatic door would take a few presses of the lock button to get it to actually lock). Each time, we brought it in, got a free rental car, and picked it up a few days later with a $0.00 bill.

    Now, right after we bought the Sonata, Hyundai started their current marketing campaign, which (3 years later) might have closed the price gap between the others. Even so, take a look at Hyundai. We'll be in the market to replace the other car soon and it'll be the first place I'll look.

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    GdiguyGdiguy San Diego, CARegistered User regular
    edited November 2008
    Peregrine's questions are key, and you'll get much better advice if you answer them, but especially narrow it down with these two:

    1) What size car are you looking for? (e.g., SUV-type, sedan-type, something hatchbacky/mini SUV inbetween)

    2) Where do you live? (i.e., is there a lot of snow, in which case you should definitely look at Subaru's, otherwise you can probably cross them off your list)


    And that new car thing is crap, the special insurance most insurance companies have for new cars is that they'll totally replace it if it's under a certain amount of time from purchase. There's nothing wrong with a new car - when I was looking, lightly used cars of some recent models cost maaaybe 10% less than just buying new, which to me wasn't worth the loss of the new-car warranty. If you're going for cost above all else, then yeah, you definitely want an older used, but the days of 40% depreciation when you drive it off the lot are over.

    Also, I wub my baby

    Gdiguy on
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    i n c u b u si n c u b u s Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    Well the little input I have on this is def look out for the MPG rate (miles per gallon). Also it may be difficult if you live in the US to get a car loan nowadays because of the economy situation, not impossible but at least more difficult than it used to be. And as for the model, with my experience you want to stay away from Mitsubishi simply because the cost for replacement parts and repairs are insane. Personally I love Ford Mustangs and those seem to be a hot item around your price range.

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    PeregrineFalconPeregrineFalcon Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    Gdiguy wrote: »
    Peregrine's questions are key, and you'll get much better advice if you answer them, but especially narrow it down with these two:

    1) What size car are you looking for? (e.g., SUV-type, sedan-type, something hatchbacky/mini SUV inbetween)

    2) Where do you live? (i.e., is there a lot of snow, in which case you should definitely look at Subaru's, otherwise you can probably cross them off your list)

    Yeah, I'm afraid my list of questions might have scared him off a little. Start with those two. :)

    Corollary to #2 though is that a set of snow tires and good driving skills will do you much more good than AWD (not picking on Subies, just general advice.)

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    CooterTKECooterTKE Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    i love my subaru WRX and my wifes Outback.

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    silence1186silence1186 Character shields down! As a wingmanRegistered User regular
    edited November 2008
    How many people do you need to transport?
    Just me

    What kind of driving do you most often do?
    Drive to school, drive back home

    How long is your commute?
    25-30 minutes

    Is it important that your next vehicle get good gas mileage?
    Absolutely, I'm looking to save money on maintenance/upkeep

    Do you want a manual or automatic transmission?
    Automatic

    Do you need four-wheel drive or all-wheel drive?
    I don't THINK so. It can snow where I live (Westchester, NY).

    What safety features do you want?
    Nothing out of the ordinary, I guess whatever is standard?

    Do you require a lot of cargo-carrying capacity?
    Nothing more than a sedan sized trunk

    Will you be doing any towing?
    No

    Will the car easily fit in your garage or parking area?
    Not in my driveway, but I can park it in front of my house, though it does tend to accumulate slightly more wear and tear underneath a tree there.

    Finally, I am considering taking the money I will spend on this car, and, rather than pay cash, I'd like to negotiate a 0.0%APR financing deal, and then just bank the 20k dollars in a CD and make some interest. Does that seem like a sane thing to do?

    silence1186 on
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    i n c u b u si n c u b u s Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    Telliing from all my finance classes, the best thing you could do is actually pay with cash. First reason being that you won't have to deal with a loan or an interest rate that comes with it and second being that you can use the cash as a literal bargaining chip when you go to buy the car. You can get the dealer to lower the price buy simply stating that (this amount) is all I have and I can't go any higher, either we have a deal or I'm leaving. Salesman will do just about anything to get you to pay more and this will eliminate any bs bargaining. Although absolutely do not go around town to every dealer flashing around a wad of 20k in cash by any means. Go shop around, do your research, pick a car you're set on and set your targets on the exact one you want THEN go after it with cash at the dealership. I highly recommend checking out the car and test driving it before signing for anything.

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    GdiguyGdiguy San Diego, CARegistered User regular
    edited November 2008
    Telliing from all my finance classes, the best thing you could do is actually pay with cash. First reason being that you won't have to deal with a loan or an interest rate that comes with it and second being that you can use the cash as a literal bargaining chip when you go to buy the car. You can get the dealer to lower the price buy simply stating that (this amount) is all I have and I can't go any higher, either we have a deal or I'm leaving. Salesman will do just about anything to get you to pay more and this will eliminate any bs bargaining. Although absolutely do not go around town to every dealer flashing around a wad of 20k in cash by any means. Go shop around, do your research, pick a car you're set on and set your targets on the exact one you want THEN go after it with cash at the dealership. I highly recommend checking out the car and test driving it before signing for anything.

    Well, IF you can get 0% financing it's basically like getting free interest on however much you're borrowing (so it could be worth ~$500), and I've had no problem with Mazda's credit people with my 0% loan (I was going to pay cash initially, as I assumed my credit wasn't good enough to get a 0% financing, but I guess some combination of it being better than I thought/them wanting to give out loans like candy worked out in my favor). However, they usually won't let you finance the entire thing, especially with 0% - I think for me I had to put something like 8k down and finance the rest

    Honestly, it sounds like you should compare the entry-level sedan class (Corolla/Civic/Mazda3/etc etc) with the next level up (Camry/Accord/Mazda6/other people fill in the rest here), and decide if the second tier is worth the upgrade. A Camry/Mazda6 with basic (but good safety) packages should be under 25k (though the Corolla/Civic type cars would probably be under 20k, and could be at the 17-18k level). For 25k you might also be nudging the lower end of hybrids if you're looking to go that route, though that I'm not positive about.

    I really liked the Mazda6, though the Camry probably has better reliability (and definitely has better mileage). I didn't really look that much further, so I'll let other people suggest Nissan/Hyundai/etc options

    For Subaru, the Imprezza is a very nice car, but 4wd adds an additional cost, and it's a judgement call as to whether it's worth it for you - if I was in Westchester I would heavily consider it (though I would also have been driving it up to go skiing / visiting family somewhat regularly, whereas if you don't really plan on doing much bad-weather driving then it's not as big a deal), but since I was going to be in the Bay Area for the next 4 years, it wasn't necessary

    Gdiguy on
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    taerictaeric Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    Gdiguy wrote: »
    \And that new car thing is crap, the special insurance most insurance companies have for new cars is that they'll totally replace it if it's under a certain amount of time from purchase. There's nothing wrong with a new car - when I was looking, lightly used cars of some recent models cost maaaybe 10% less than just buying new, which to me wasn't worth the loss of the new-car warranty. If you're going for cost above all else, then yeah, you definitely want an older used, but the days of 40% depreciation when you drive it off the lot are over.

    The new car period you are referring to is something you have to buy specifically. Most dealerships actually offer something.

    And while you are right that 40% deprecation off the lot is gone, I would have a hard time balking at even 10% deprecation. Granted, if you are buying cash or can get a short term lease, it is no big deal. If you go for a 60 month one, though, you will almost always be at the waterline on your loan. And that is a best case situation.

    All of that said, I should have more plainly said the following. If you are thinking that you can make a "good investment" in a vehicle, I highly recommend turning tail and running right now. Take your CD example. The car itself will be losing upwards of around 10 to 30% in the first year alone (and that is assuming you do not put a ton of miles on it). Do you really think you can get a CD that has returns even approaching the amount of money you are losing on the vehicle?

    taeric on
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    noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    I bought a Nissan Senta 07 last year and I been nothing but happy with it. Pretty good gas mileage, good room(especially the trunk), and handles well. Same with the Altima I had previous to that.

    On the whole new/used thing, definately don't rule out used cars. I bought mine new because for my entire life I had to drive old beat up cars that needed lots of upkeep, so I wanted something different, but every once in a while I do regret not looking more intensely at my options.

    noir_blood on
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    TexiKenTexiKen Dammit! That fish really got me!Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    You could get a top of the line Hyundai Elantra or Honda Civic in that range. Both are the best of the small cars, and get 30+ mpg.

    Also, if you finance make sure you get a simple interest note, that way you can pay more per month if you want.

    TexiKen on
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    MishraMishra Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    Well I grew up in Westchester (Go river towns). The snow can get pretty bad, I drove an old camry through High school and it did alright, Snow tires, or smart driving with all weathers will do you just fine.If you do decide to look at subaru, I recommend you test drive the Legacy, the Impreza is great and what I thought I'd orgiginally buy, but the Legacy just had a littlebit of extra quality that sold me on it. Plus the extra room is nice for carting around my friends.

    Mishra on
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    Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    I'm more in favor of buying a slightly used car over a brand new car. As someone says, a large portion of the value of the car drops as soon as you drive it off the parking lot. Nothing sucks more then being upside down on something you just brought 3 minutes ago. A easy way to fix that is to have someone else take the hit.

    Quickly glancing through your criterias I would consider a B-segment car, such as

    07.toyota.yaris.340.jpg

    honda-fit.jpg

    0802_02z2010_ford_fiestafront_three_quarter_view.jpg

    Though IMO I think you'll be best off using something along the line of this

    road_bicycle_700c.jpg

    Casually Hardcore on
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    PeregrineFalconPeregrineFalcon Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    How many people do you need to transport?
    Just me

    What kind of driving do you most often do?
    Drive to school, drive back home

    How long is your commute?
    25-30 minutes

    Is it important that your next vehicle get good gas mileage?
    Absolutely, I'm looking to save money on maintenance/upkeep

    Do you want a manual or automatic transmission?
    Automatic

    Do you need four-wheel drive or all-wheel drive?
    I don't THINK so. It can snow where I live (Westchester, NY).

    What safety features do you want?
    Nothing out of the ordinary, I guess whatever is standard?

    Do you require a lot of cargo-carrying capacity?
    Nothing more than a sedan sized trunk

    Will you be doing any towing?
    No

    Will the car easily fit in your garage or parking area?
    Not in my driveway, but I can park it in front of my house, though it does tend to accumulate slightly more wear and tear underneath a tree there.

    Finally, I am considering taking the money I will spend on this car, and, rather than pay cash, I'd like to negotiate a 0.0%APR financing deal, and then just bank the 20k dollars in a CD and make some interest. Does that seem like a sane thing to do?

    Used versus New
    Let's get this one out of the way right now. It looks like you're after a commuter car, and don't put much weight into motorsport. That's not necessarily a bad thing, as it means you don't have to give much thought to vehicles that can inflict Massive Damage at stoplights/drag strips/track days/etc. It also means that you can get a fairly inexpensive but dependable used car, and just drive it into the ground.

    That said, let's call this the "New Car Post."

    Paying For It
    Props for being able to slap down $20K in cash for a car, because you've either made some sound financial decisions in the past or gotten away with a fairly significant crime. :P But just because you can doesn't mean you should. It seems like you're looking at a purchase, and that's certainly fine as long as you plan to hold on to the car for the entire period. As mentioned, you'll pretty much be upside-down on it as soon as you drive it off the lot.

    Financing - Why It Makes Sense
    No, a car is not an investment. (With an exception for the guys who bought '67 Hemi 'Cudas right before they blew up in value.) It will depreciate, and quite rapidly. That said, if you pay for it all up front, that's $20K you don't have that is earning you $0 to offset the depreciation. If you get a 0% APR over a certain number of years (I wouldn't finance anything for > 5 years) you at least have those X years to make that $20K try to make back a few percentage points on itself.

    With that said some manufacturers just don't do 0% financing. Domestic sellers tend to have it, imports tend not to - with the exception for Mazda and Hyundai. Toyota, Honda, and Nissan will often bring them down to the 0.9% or 1.9% area. If you can make that $20K earn more than that, you'll be ahead by financing.

    The Car to Choose:
    The B-segment, aka "Subcompact" car might be right up your alley, but consider also how long you plan to own this vehicle. Let's say you're financing over five years. Will you still only be driving yourself around in five year's time? Will you still need only a small amount of luggage space? It's worth thinking about. I'm not saying you need to buy a land barge with four wheels, but a tiny car doesn't leave much room to grow.

    Personally, I'd look at the next size up - that would put you into the realm of approximately a shitton of competing models. List spoilered, in no particular order, and also incomplete.
    Honda Civic
    Toyota Corolla
    Mazda 3
    Nissan Sentra
    Hyundai Elantra
    VW Rabbit / Jetta
    Chevy Cobalt/Pontiac G5
    Ford Focus
    Dodge Caliber
    Mitsubishi Lancer

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    MishraMishra Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    Though IMO I think you'll be best off using something along the line of this

    road_bicycle_700c.jpg

    Clearly you've never been to Westchester, especially in the winter.

    Mishra on
    "Give a man a fire, he's warm for the night. Set a man on fire he's warm for the rest of his life."
    -Terry Pratchett
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    DVGDVG No. 1 Honor Student Nether Institute, Evil AcademyRegistered User regular
    edited November 2008
    I just got a 2009 Scion xD. It's cheaper than your range, great gas mileage and a 10-gallon tank, so it's easy on the wallet at the pump.

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    PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    I would strongly, strongly urge you to at least test drive a Hyundai within your price range. I suspect you will be very pleasantly surprised by their current offerings in that range.

    I know that my '04 Elantra GT came just about fully loaded (six speaker sound system, remote locks, power everything, hatchback, alloy wheels, 4 wheel disc brakes, only thing it didn't have was leather or a sunroof which were a $1500 options package away) and has yet to let me down in any regard. The brakes survived to 86,000 KM before replacement pads were required, there's been no mechanical failures whatsoever, and it gets good gas mileage while also providing comfortable seating for 4 (semi-comfortable for 5) and an immense amount of cargo capacity. This plus a 7 year warranty, and it was at the low end of your price range.

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    YourFatAuntSusanYourFatAuntSusan Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    Reposting my recommendation from a previous car thread.

    I bought a 2008 Elantra GLS Sport (SE equivalent) this spring. It was rated this years top pick in the small sedan category by Consumer Reports against the Civic, Corolla, Cobalt, Aveo, Focus and Mazda3 in road test, reliability and safety tests. The only other cars recommended in that class were the Ford Focus and Subaru Impreza.

    http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do...ticleId=126602

    "The Elantra's top rating in the small sedan class shows how far Hyundai has come in the last decade," it said. "Its cars used to be unreliable and unrefined, with low scores in CR's tests. Now, some compete with the best in their classes."

    Personally, I think it's a blast to drive even though it only has 138 hp in a 4 cylinder engine. I average 35-40mpg in a mix of semi-aggressive city and highway driving. I also like the fact that I have front, side curtain, side seat and rear curtain airbags, wheel mounted cruise control/stereo controls, air conditioning, power windows, remote power door locks w/ alarm, heated seats, 6 speaker cd/mp3 stereo w/ auxillary jack, power sliding glass moonroof, foglights, 16" alloy wheels and a rear spoiler. All but the foglights, alloy rims, sunroof and spoiler are standard on the GLS version which is the trim level most commonly sold. We opted for the next level up to get the extras and I'm glad we did.

    Here are a couple photos of mine. (which has been tinted by a third party, not factory) Spoilered for a bunch of images.

    avante7.jpg

    avante8.jpg

    DSC_3573.jpg

    DSC_3566.jpg

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    taerictaeric Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    Seeing this thread again, I do want to apologize for heavily pushing a used vehicle. I did not mean to push it into a huge used car rant, just wanted to make sure you had addressed that question. :) In the end, go for what you want. And since this is the new car thread, I will offer my experience here.

    I had a VW Golf for a time. It was a tiny car, but once the seats were folded down could hold a ton of stuff in it. Was a blast to drive, and had I been a little more financially savvy, we'd still have it. (In fact, once we lose my wife's company car, we may be looking to pick up one used.) I had the diesel, which got above 40mpg, but the cost of diesel shot up once I bought it. Never did the math to see if I was still doing alright in spending on fuel. (I'm guessing I was negative.)

    My wife has a Miata. For basically being a toy, the thing is a TON of fun to drive. Especially so if you like convertables.

    taeric on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    I've got a Golf as well and we're very happy with it. It's sporty but reasonably roomy for a hatchback. In the UK, Golf has a reasonably good reliability reputation, although I understand that in the US it's often ranked as one of the most unreliable brands, so consider that.

    We have a five-door as it's more family friendly but you could probably get away with a three door if you aren't going to be taking passengers very often.

    For the mileage silence is doing, it probably isn't going to be worth buying a diesel. It takes a long time and clocking huge miles to offset the additional cost of a diesel engine and to catch up on the extra cost per gallon.

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    taerictaeric Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    For the mileage silence is doing, it probably isn't going to be worth buying a diesel. It takes a long time and clocking huge miles to offset the additional cost of a diesel engine and to catch up on the extra cost per gallon.

    This is pretty much what I would have expected. I would expect the diesel engines to still last longer than the gas ones, but even then, I am unsure of how much.

    Also, I should have mentioned that I had the 5 door, as well. Was rather incredible how many folks could fit in there. :)

    taeric on
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    GungHoGungHo Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    Finally, I am considering taking the money I will spend on this car, and, rather than pay cash, I'd like to negotiate a 0.0%APR financing deal, and then just bank the 20k dollars in a CD and make some interest. Does that seem like a sane thing to do?
    It depends. Don't count on getting a 0% APR on a new car unless you're willing to buy American or from a couple of furrin manufacturers, pay sticker and/or buy a 2008 model or buy certain cars within their product line (you probably won't be able to get a Mustang GT for 0%... but they'll certainly sell you a F-150 for that and will blow you in the finance office). Note, right now, 2009 models are coming out. Once you factor in the amount you could discount from the sticker or the depreciation you automatically get hit with with buying a car from the previous model year or for buying 'merkin, you may not have saved much money at all by going with 0% over taking a loan.
    Telliing from all my finance classes, the best thing you could do is actually pay with cash.
    Well, if you do that, you don't build a credit history. Sometimes, it's ok to take a big loan, especially if you're young and have no credit history and you know you can pay the loan off easily. If you've got the cash/earnings, I'd suggest you make the loan a short one... 3 or 4 years, rather than 5 or 6. That way you'll have a paid off loan soon within the terms of the loan and you're not upside down as long.

    GungHo on
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    PrecursorPrecursor Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    The Car to Choose:
    The B-segment, aka "Subcompact" car might be right up your alley, but consider also how long you plan to own this vehicle. Let's say you're financing over five years. Will you still only be driving yourself around in five year's time? Will you still need only a small amount of luggage space? It's worth thinking about. I'm not saying you need to buy a land barge with four wheels, but a tiny car doesn't leave much room to grow.
    It's worth noting that most of the B-segment cars are hatchbacks that offer more cargo room than most of the cars you listed in the next size up. They still are small cars, but depending on your height and size it might not be a problem.

    Personally, I'll echo what a lot of people said in this thread already and say take a look at the Hyundais. They have much better quality than they did when they first started producing cars and they also offer an amazing warranty package in case you do run into trouble. Also, because they're not as popular as the Japanese brands, you can get a lot of car for your money.

    Precursor on
    Quashdom.png
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    Vladimir7Vladimir7 Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    I am in the same situation as the OP.
    I am looking at buying a car within the next 6 months. (Probably sometime shortly after the new year)
    I would be willing to spend up to $25k after tax/freight/PDI/bs ass rape fee (note I am in ontario, Canada)

    How many people do you need to transport?
    Up to 3 people. Usually just myself, but about once every week I will drive 2 other people to go out for lunch.

    What kind of driving do you most often do?
    90% highway driving.

    How long is your commute?
    30min each way, 5 days a week.

    Is it important that your next vehicle get good gas mileage?
    Fairly good. My current vehicle gives 22mpg. I would really like something that gives 35+

    Do you want a manual or automatic transmission?
    Most likely manual. Although I can go with auto to.

    Do you need four-wheel drive or all-wheel drive?
    No

    What safety features do you want?
    Standard? Not sure

    Do you require a lot of cargo-carrying capacity?
    Nope

    Will you be doing any towing?
    Nope

    Will the car easily fit in your garage or parking area?
    Yes.

    I also have 30k cash sitting in my bank. I would prefer to buy the car outright if they have good cash incentives. But if they don't, but do have 0% financing, I guess I would go with that.
    I am also planning on keeping this vehicle for a long time... Until it becomes unusable. Could this change in the future? Possibly, if I get a massive pay upgrade or something... But I am also looking at purchasing a house in the next few years, so I will not want to buy another car then.

    I have looked at a few different ones, but the one that has caught my eye right now is the 2010 Mazda 3 which is supposedly being released early next year (Jan or Feb).
    I have never even considered a Hyundia but I have been hearing a lot of people happy with it recently.

    I am also 23, so I would want to meet with my insurance company to see how much my insurance will go up. I have been doing some online quotes, and it looks like it will be going up significantly (I currently drive a 92 Toyota)... But the range was fairly close with most cars from the last 3 years to now. A couple hundred dollar spread a year, so not too significant.. and I NEED another car, and want to get something no older then 4 years, but prefer new/something that has a year or 2 manufacturers warranty.

    Vladimir7 on
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    MishraMishra Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    taeric wrote: »
    For the mileage silence is doing, it probably isn't going to be worth buying a diesel. It takes a long time and clocking huge miles to offset the additional cost of a diesel engine and to catch up on the extra cost per gallon.

    This is pretty much what I would have expected. I would expect the diesel engines to still last longer than the gas ones, but even then, I am unsure of how much.

    Also, I should have mentioned that I had the 5 door, as well. Was rather incredible how many folks could fit in there. :)

    Diesel isn't the best option in NY from my experience. My parents had a diesel and in the winter they had huge problems with the fuel separating due to the cold. If you're living in an apartment with no where to plug in a heater have fun starting your car through January and February. Granted this was an older diesel from the 80's, but just a warning.

    Mishra on
    "Give a man a fire, he's warm for the night. Set a man on fire he's warm for the rest of his life."
    -Terry Pratchett
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    winter_combat_knightwinter_combat_knight Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    Not much of a car nut but, Subaru Liberty/Legacy. Sorta expensive, but they just keep going and going. I've had no problems with them cars!

    winter_combat_knight on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    taeric wrote: »
    For the mileage silence is doing, it probably isn't going to be worth buying a diesel. It takes a long time and clocking huge miles to offset the additional cost of a diesel engine and to catch up on the extra cost per gallon.

    This is pretty much what I would have expected. I would expect the diesel engines to still last longer than the gas ones, but even then, I am unsure of how much.

    Also, I should have mentioned that I had the 5 door, as well. Was rather incredible how many folks could fit in there. :)

    Diesels often have a better resale value as well, but...well, you don't buy a car because it's a good investment. I used to be a committed diesel driver but switched to petrol last year just before fuel prices went through the roof and I'm glad of it. I really don't get through noticeably more fuel than before - I still refill the tank every fortnight same as I did with the diesel - and petrol is a hell of a lot cheaper than diesel just now.

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    taerictaeric Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    Diesels often have a better resale value as well, but...well, you don't buy a car because it's a good investment. I used to be a committed diesel driver but switched to petrol last year just before fuel prices went through the roof and I'm glad of it. I really don't get through noticeably more fuel than before - I still refill the tank every fortnight same as I did with the diesel - and petrol is a hell of a lot cheaper than diesel just now.

    The fact that they had such decent resale actually saved my butt. Was able to sell it before the halfway point and not have to write a big check to the bank. You are definitely correct on the investment thing, though. :)

    I'm not sure how I fall in the whole spectrum of deisel driving, now. If petrol goes back up even with diesel again, I'd be willing to get a diesel. So long as it is close to double the cost, though, hard to even think about.

    taeric on
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    useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    I would look at previous year models that were loaners or demo cars, I just got a 41k car for 28k because of this (08 with 3k miles)...

    Another thing, cash versus financing:
    The car salesman doesn't get anything better if you pay cash or financing to him it's "this much was spent therefore I make this much off him"
    The loan people get a bonus if they finance you so they don't want cash.

    Buying a car with cash is almost a literal pain in the ass to the dealer for so many reasons they avoid it if possible.

    And despite what the media is saying, I found it really really easy to get a car loan. Hell, my car insurance company offered me 60k pre-approved to refinance before they even asked what car i bought etc.

    useless4 on
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    taerictaeric Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    useless4 wrote: »
    Buying a car with cash is almost a literal pain in the ass to the dealer for so many reasons they avoid it if possible.

    It is getting to the point where, even if that is a true statement, it is over shadowed by this one: "Selling a car is such a pain in the ass, that most dealerships will do anything they can to finalize the sell on your first visit."

    taeric on
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    useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    True.
    Every place I went took between 8 and 11k off the sticker without pause or hesitation EXCEPT for the douchebags at a Dodge dealer.

    They ADDED to the sticker of a stock 6cyl Dodge Challenger and literally told me they didn't need my business when I simply said that the car was 6k out of the range I was looking at. This was because of an undervalued trade and a overpriced car with the dealer markup. Three weeks later that same challenger is sitting unsold.

    In this time, the people who want Challengers are the people who want the srt-8s , not some 6cyclinder. I got my 6cyl mustang the same way the year the S197 models came out... everyone who wanted one wanted a GT so they had a ton sitting the week before Christmas on a Ford lot. They begged me to take one honestly.

    If I hadn't found such a good deal on a Land Rover I would be rocking the Hyundai Santa Fe though because they were making crazy deals there.

    useless4 on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    The number of cars some people get through astonishes me. I've been driving for over ten years and am only on my third car.

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    taerictaeric Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2008
    The number of cars some people get through astonishes me. I've been driving for over ten years and am only on my third car.

    While I do agree with you, I recall my grandparents and my wife's parents have managed to make 1 car last that long. :)

    taeric on
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    useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    The number of cars some people get through astonishes me. I've been driving for over ten years and am only on my third car.

    That works out to an average of a new car every three to five years you know.
    I would say that's about american average.

    Longest I have owned a car: 7 years
    Shortest: 8 months - I bought a first year VW Toureg and was running into some problems, and the more I read up the more I realized these problems were going to keep coming and coming. I dumped it for a lost of only 3k and called it a day. Bought a mustang which was also a first model year, kept that thing almost 4 years and never ever had a problem with it. Only reason it went is that I am now married and we had two ea. two door cars with no trunk space.

    useless4 on
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    HardtargetHardtarget There Are Four Lights VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited November 2008
    note didn't read thread
    Mazda 3 is the answer

    Hardtarget on
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    silence1186silence1186 Character shields down! As a wingmanRegistered User regular
    edited November 2008
    I ended up going with a Toyota Scion tC. Thanks to all who helped me.

    silence1186 on
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