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Recommended fantasy novels?

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    SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    redx wrote:
    Hey, so Pratchet is fantasy, shouldn't there be a book coming out soon? I'd heard it was almost like clockwork that a new discworld book came out around christmas. I've heard or seen anything, not that I've really been looking.
    Wintersmith just came out about a month ago.

    Senjutsu on
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    redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Senjutsu wrote:
    Wintersmith just came out about a month ago.

    wierd I've been watching the various new book racks at my barns and noble, I can't really imagine them not getting any copies.

    damn, looks like I might have to go to a bookstore without a starbucks or order it online.

    thanks though.

    redx on
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    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2006
    Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke. I cannot recommend this book enough. It is, in my humble opinion, better than the Tolkien books by a fairly significant degree.

    Premier kakos on
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    DynagripDynagrip Break me a million hearts HoustonRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2006
    Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke. I cannot recommend this book enough. It is, in my humble opinion, better than the Tolkien books by a fairly significant degree.
    I did not think this book would be your bag. I really really hated it.

    Dynagrip on
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    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Steven Erikson - The Malazan Series.
    George RR Martin - A Song of Ice and Fire.
    Gene Wolfe - The Sun series & Wizard/Knight(although I def don't rate him as high as some on here seem to....)
    Scott R Bakker - The Prince of Nothing series(dark & not typical fantasy.). It's a difficult read like it or not.
    China Mieville - The New Crobuzon novels are very good, but it's borderline sci-fi fantasy.
    Jeff VanderMeer - City of Saints & Madman(stories...) & Shriek: An Afterword are bothy awesome.

    The above are, IMO. The absolute best that fantasy can offer over the last 15-20 years.
    Many other decent authors are worth reading - Hobb, GG Kay, Gaiman etc, but few people would disagree with that selection.


    Edit:
    Thoughts? What do you think makes a good fantasy novel?

    There are several cases:
    Splendid storyline, decent writing: Erikson & George RR
    Not so original story + very good prose: Wolfe & Bakker
    Just so strange(tm): Mieville + Vandermeer;o)))

    zeeny on
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    strakha_7strakha_7 Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Senjutsu wrote:
    Oh, and Guy Gavriel Kay. Fionavvar Tapestry, Tigana, Lions of Al-Rassan, and several other things.

    The Crystal Cave by Mary Stewart. I liked it, anyways...

    edited on rather than another post:

    The first book of Bakker's Prince of Nothing series was good. It was a good, one-off book that could have had a good series to follow it up. In my opinion, the second book stunk like a pile of poop. I didn't even bother getting the third book. You know who the heros are, and nothing happens to them. Ever.

    strakha_7 on
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    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    strakha_7 wrote:
    You know who the heros are, and nothing happens to them. Ever.

    ....mmmm. It's a strange finale, but a finale nonetheless. 2nd book is worst of the series as it doesn't hold true to the premise from the first volume, but IMO, it's a series worth finishing.

    zeeny on
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    TastyfishTastyfish Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Right now this thread is a mess, its more or less just go the 'fantasy section in a book shop' if you're recomending the Books of the New Sun alongside Dragonlance and 40K. This thread needs some order.

    Fantasy (and Scifi seeing as a fair few sit on the border) is a lot more complicated than just the one category so you really need to give us a bit more information. The way I see it, these are probably the best categories to use.

    Pulp Scifi
    You're Warhammer, 40K Star Wars and D&D etc books. Can be good fun in a guilty pleasure sort of way and easy to read, however it won't take more than a weekend or a few bus trips and lets face it, they are less than world shattering. Generally the cheesy action movies of the genre.


    DragonLance Chronicles and DragonLance Legends
    Salvatore's Drizzt Do'urdan series
    Dan Abnett's Gaunt's Ghosts


    Teen/Entry level Fantasy
    Books that are too thick to be in trade paperback and thus a step up from pulp fantasy as there is a bit more of an investment. The books that everyone has read when they were 14 or so and has fond memories of but with seem a bit simple later on. Pick up one of these if you've not really read a lot before, everyone here will knock them but you'll probably love them until you start reading better things later on.

    David Eddings' Belgariad, Mallorean and all the other books that are also the Belgariad and the Mallorean even though they have different titles.
    Eragon
    Ann Macaffery's Dragonriders of Pern

    Terry Pratchett's Discworld series (controversal I know, but its comic fantasy so itsn't supposed to be taken as seriously as the other stuff that will be recomended, I do love them. By the way the book you guys are waiting for is Wintersmith, its another Tiffany Aching/Wee Free Men one).
    Don't start at the beginning, the style changes completely after the first 4 or 5 books, its also worth noting that it is sort of a set of series set within the same setting (sorry). Despite this, I'd reccomend Hogfather seeing as the TV adaptation is out this Christmas so its going to be everywhere, alternatively Mort and Soul Music are the two that precede the Susan Sto Helit/Death Series


    Proper Fantasy
    Can't think of a better name, but its sort of the fantasy equivalent to SF. The books tend to be a bit older and can take some real effort to read, don't expect to be able to sit and read things like Gene Wolfe's Books of the New Sun for 5-10 minutes at a time and be able to cope. Its more this effort that has to go into reading them that I'm sort of defining it by, so hopefully someone else understands what I mean by this sort of thing. Fantasy as Proper Literature.
    Think I would put the Tales of Thomas Covenant here as well, but not sure.

    Good Modern Fantasy
    Comes in two flavours, normal books or Epic Series. Probably the type of thing you will end up reading most of, good characters, brilliant settings a decent plot and slightly more easy to read than the older Proper Fantasy. Seems to me to be a lot easier to find in scifi than fantasy, but its probably just me being picky. The Epic Series is a subtype of this, but you'll need to spend a bit of time at the beginning getting used to them as they tend to have a huge number of characters all doing different things at the same time, however they are some of the best books ever written.

    China Meiville's Perdido Street Station and The Scar

    Epic Series -
    Steven Erikson's Malazan Books of the Fallen
    George R R Martin's Song of Ice and Fire

    That all said, if you get any books, get these.


    So...think it would help to try and put the books in these sort of categories, give people a better sort of idea what they are like (be a lot easier when we've got more books in them to compare others against)? Any types I've missed out or over generalised over? Was tempted to have a set of Books You Should Avoid At All Costs because people in the real world are going to try to force WoT and Sword of Truth books on him.

    Tastyfish on
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    Target PracticeTarget Practice Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Glaeal wrote:
    I swear, if fucking Robert Jordan dies before WoT is finished, heads will roll. I don't even fucking like it anymore, but I'm too invested to stop reading.

    I read the series up to book 10 the last time I read through, but I got stuck in the middle. Does book 11 actually carry the story any further, or is it just more smoothing dresses and nothing happening?
    Man, nothing fucking happened in Book 10 at all

    Book 11 was pretty good, wrapped up a lot of stuff

    Really you can probably go straight from Book 6 to 11 without being too confused

    Target Practice on
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    Mongrel IdiotMongrel Idiot Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    I gotta throw in a word or two against Martin. He's good, don't get me wrong, but I think he errs too far on the side of ducking cliches, to the point where you can call the action because it WILL be the opposite of what a more "mainstream" fantasy would have. Also, he drags a little.

    Dennic L. McKiernan is pretty good, a little generic and Tolkienish (his first tirlogy started life as a sequel to LOTR), but some of his books that aren't The Iron Tower trilogy are pretty awesome. He's in the middle of a series of reimagined fairy tales I'm quite liking. I'd say his best is The Eye of the Hunter. Only book that's ever made me cry, actually.

    Eddings is enjoyable, and I've heard Orson Scott Card did some fantasy, though I haven't read any of it.

    EDIT: McKiernan would fit into Tastyfish's "teen/entry level" category, I think, on the more mature edge of it.

    Mongrel Idiot on
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    GlaealGlaeal Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Where's a good place to start to get into Warhammer 40K?

    Glaeal on
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    skimbleshanksskimbleshanks __BANNED USERS regular
    edited November 2006
    I am going to be different and recommend "The Eyes of the Dragon" by Stephen King. It's the first fantasy book I read and the book that got me interested in fantasy in general, so I may be biased, but I think it's a pretty good yarn as long as you keep in mind that there are no GRRM-esque plotlines here.

    It also ties into the Dark Tower series, if that's your bag.

    skimbleshanks on
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    MutePrezMutePrez Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    I agree with Dennis L McKiernan - especially Voyage of the Fox Rider.

    MutePrez on
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    Knuckle DraggerKnuckle Dragger Explosive Ovine Disposal Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Raymond Feist's Midkemia books are good if you're just getting into fantasy. Relatively easy read, and Magician is a classic.

    I'm not as big a fan of his later books as his early ones, but they are all entertaining reads.

    Terry Pratchett is also great; his books often satirize modern issues and institutions in a fantasy setting and are about the only novels that have made me bust out laughing while I was reading.

    C. J. Cherryh's foreigner series is also somewhat interesting. It is science fiction rather than fantasy (for those who draw a distinction), but it has an interesting focus on the interaction between an alien culture and their human ambassador.

    Knuckle Dragger on
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    Mongrel IdiotMongrel Idiot Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    MutePrez wrote:
    I agree with Dennis L McKiernan - especially Voyage of the Fox Rider.
    Holy fuck, I have never ONCE mentioned McKiernan and had anybody else recognize the name. I thought I was the only person who'd read him.

    Mongrel Idiot on
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    DalbozDalboz Resident Puppy Eater Right behind you...Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    I've been looking into reading The Age of Unreason series by Greg Keyes (first book being Newton's Cannon), despite the fact that I didn't particularly like The Waterborn. It seems to be sort of a fantasy/alternate history series in which Isaac Newton was successful in his experiments with alchemy and created Philospher's Mercury, which changes the course of European history and scientific development.

    The Wheel of Times series was good up through the fifth book, but after that, it seems to be dragging horribly. I've tried slogging my way through the ninth book, but I find it difficult after not reading it for so long and trying to remember who all these people are and their significance in the previous books.

    I read the first Sword of Truth book and really liked it, and I keep meaning to read the others but haven't gotten around to it. I'll probably re-read Wizard's First Rule before I try, though, since it's been so long since I read it.

    If you liked Lord of the Rings, there's always the Shannara books by Terry Brooks.

    Dalboz on
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    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Dalboz wrote:
    If you liked Lord of the Rings, there's always the Shannara books by Terry Brooks.

    ...they kill people on some forums for saying stuff like that;o))))))))

    zeeny on
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    IShallRiseAgainIShallRiseAgain Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    the Harry Potter books are a good read and much better compared to the movies.

    IShallRiseAgain on
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    TastyfishTastyfish Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Glaeal wrote:
    Where's a good place to start to get into Warhammer 40K?
    If you really want to, the Eisenhorn trilogy (Xenos, Hereticus and Malleus) are supposed to be some of the best and everyone raves about Gaunt's Ghosts. Quite liked what I've read of For the Emperor! though its a comedy one (done in the style of the Flashman novels apparently, but this means nothing to me).

    However the obvious first place to start is here, the Black Library's PDF archive, where they have a chapter or so of each book for you to read. See if any grab you and then pick those up.

    Tastyfish on
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    Eight RooksEight Rooks Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Dynagrip wrote:
    Senjutsu wrote:
    Dynagrip wrote:
    Oh man, why did you have to recommend Tad Williams? Are those actually any better than his Otherland shit?
    Quite a bit. Martin actually cited it as the primary thing that convinced him that fantasy could be approached in a more mature manner than your average crap, and set him to writing a Song of Ice and Fire.
    I can't help but think this is some kind of cruel trick.

    I like Memory, Sorrow & Thorn, up to a point, and that still just blew my mind. I like Otherland, for goodness' sake, but Martin is still so much better than Williams on just about every level it's hard to imagine the man needing to take inspiration from MS&T.

    Oh, and anyone who hasn't realised that Pratchett makes some serious, intelligent, astute and thought-provoking observations and commentaries on institutions, traditions, worldviews and just people in general needs to go read them again. They may be pigeonholed as "teen fantasy", but they're (well, the later Discworld novels, at least) anything but.

    Plus restating for the umpteenth time Mieville never did anything for me. Cold, detached, emotionless and uninteresting, much like most critically touted hard SF (Jeff Noon, Greg Bear et al).

    Guy Gavriel Kay, Robin Hobb and Vernor Vinge would probably be my favourite fantasy/SF authors, for reference.

    Eight Rooks on
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    DalbozDalboz Resident Puppy Eater Right behind you...Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Oh, yeah. If your looking for roleplaying type fantasy (i.e., D&D), Vampire of the Mists (originally the first book in the Ravenloft series) has just been re-released, and it's a very good read.

    Dalboz on
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    captainkcaptaink TexasRegistered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Eddings is an example of what I call "trash fantasy." This isn't a truly bad thing, the books just aren't very deep or especially moving. They're definitely readable though.

    Terry Brooks is probably also "trash fantasy" but I generally like his stuff. The original Sword of Shanarra is pretty much a LotR ripoff, but they get better after it. He also has the Knight of the Word and Landover series.

    I've read a lot of the Dragonlance books in my younger days, and they're pretty bland trash fantasy through and through. R.A. Salvatore's Drizzt books belong here too.

    Two of my current faves, A Song of Ice and Fire and the Malazan Book of the Fallen, are unfinished at the moment, which makes me pause when recommending them.
    The Sworn Sword and The Hedge Knight are both good, by the way. Excellent examples of a less epic style of fantasy.

    The Hobbit is good, the Silmarillion isn't really a fantasy book. It's like the Bible for Middle Earth.

    Robin Hobb has excellent character-driven fantasy. Her stuff is meaty, but I liked all three trilogies a lot. Start with Assassin's Apprentice.

    Harry Potter is also a solid choice. The last book should be out sometime in the next year, so I don't feel bad recommending an unfinished series.

    I'm about to finish Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman, and I think I would reccommend it. His stuff is a little more like fairy tales, but he's really an excellent writer.

    Roger Zelazny was too juvenile for me. Something about his writing style and dialogue really rubs me the wrong way. I finished the Amber series, but I wouldn't buy anything of his again.

    Sword of Truth stuff starts out good but moves into snuff novel territory by the end of the first book. He really enjoys torturing his characters and it's disturbing.

    I tried the first book of the Fiovanar Tapestry, but I didn't like it. It's supposed to be quasi-Celtic right?

    captaink on
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    JinniganJinnigan Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    I never got into Raymond Feist stuff. Something about the writing style made me incredibly angry whenever I picked it up, though I got through a few books and the stories themselves were fine.

    Jinnigan on
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    EmperorSethEmperorSeth Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Dalboz wrote:
    I've been looking into reading The Age of Unreason series by Greg Keyes (first book being Newton's Cannon), despite the fact that I didn't particularly like The Waterborn. It seems to be sort of a fantasy/alternate history series in which Isaac Newton was successful in his experiments with alchemy and created Philospher's Mercury, which changes the course of European history and scientific development.

    Wow, I'm amazed to see another Keyes fan here, though honestly I thought the Waterborn was better than Age of Unreason; I though Unreason started to drag a bit in the last two books. Pratchett's an obvious and good call, though. I can see why someone might want to skip some of the early books, since he definately improves his style as he goes. Small Gods is not a bad entry point, since it's one of his few stand alone storylines and he was well established at the time.

    EmperorSeth on
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    Eight RooksEight Rooks Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Brooks, Feist, Eddings and Gemmell are all trash fantasy to me. Pulp writing with no real emotional insight and no purpose beyond escapism and simple gratification. Just saying. I've read a fair few of Brooks and Feist's books, and one or two Gemmell, and they just struck me as absolutely nothing special. Opinions opinions lol, and all that.

    Eight Rooks on
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    RustRust __BANNED USERS regular
    edited November 2006
    From what I've heard, the Sword of Truth series is Ayn Rand with even LESS subtlety and a protagonist who happens to be the biggest Gary Stu in the universe.

    Is this erroneous?

    Also, like a few others said, anything - or everything - by Terry Pratchett.

    Rust on
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    ZsetrekZsetrek Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Rust wrote:
    From what I've heard, the Sword of Truth series is Ayn Rand with even LESS subtlety and a protagonist who happens to be the biggest Gary Stu in the universe.

    Is this erroneous?

    Not really. The whole thing comes off as a vaguely-creepy wish fulfillment.

    China Mieville is pretty much a fantasy Karl Marx, but I love his writing dearly. The problem with Sword of Truth is not that it's political, it's a) too polemic, b) just not very good writing.

    Zsetrek on
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    TankHammerTankHammer Atlanta Ghostbuster Atlanta, GARegistered User regular
    edited November 2006
    I don't know how "Fantasy" you're going for, but the Damphir series By Barb and J.C. Hendee is very enjoyable. I'm waiting for the most-current iteration to hit paperback in my local bookstores and have read all the others. I like the character-driven story and it's a very light read. I could see this becoming a series either on T.V. or anime, as I think the episodic story-arcs lend themselves well.

    It's far from epic though, so don't expect a Tolkein-esque world of wizardry and dragons.

    Usula Le Guin's Earthsea books caught my interest when I was a wee lad and I've picked up a compilation from her but haven't gone into it yet. I only read the first book but it has forever captured me as the way a fantasy world should be, as it is not medieval European lore come to life, but some grand Taoist south-pacific island setting. I appreciated that aspect a great deal.

    I'm not a D&D player and I don't obsess over lore and histories so much. I like good, solid characters and that's where my recommendations will get you.

    TankHammer on
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    Bloods EndBloods End Blade of Tyshalle Punch dimensionRegistered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Heroes Die and Blade of Tyshalle by Matthew Woodring Stover.

    Simply excellent.

    Bloods End on
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    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Bloods End wrote:
    Heroes Die and Blade of Tyshalle by Matthew Woodring Stover.

    Simply excellent.

    Superb recommendations, but again borderline sci-fi...;o)

    zeeny on
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    thorpethorpe Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    His Dark Materials, Song of Ice and Fire, The Martian Chronicles (sometimes labelled sci-fi, but really, really not), Something Wicked this Way Comes, and fuck yes Earthsea.

    thorpe on
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    Bad KittyBad Kitty Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    I don't read much fantasy anymore because I find that as a genre it's pretty stagnant.

    That said, I will never ever stop recommending Ursula K. LeGuin's Earthsea Cycle. It's brilliantly written, characterized, and philosophized and is the most evoking fantasy series I have read.

    For a bit of fun, but not in the trashy Piers Anthony sense, I recommend John Barnes' Once Upon a Morning Glory for a bit of a meta-story where the characters are aware that their own roles are in a fairytale, knowingly behaving, discussing, and fulfilling the unwritten but commonly understoof rules of fairytale genre. It's a great way of turning the usually stiffling plot contrivances of genre fiction into an entertaining novel.

    Bad Kitty on
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    SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    captaink wrote:
    I tried the first book of the Fiovanar Tapestry, but I didn't like it. It's supposed to be quasi-Celtic right?
    It stuck me as much more norse than celtic influenced.

    Senjutsu on
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    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Senjutsu wrote:
    captaink wrote:
    I tried the first book of the Fiovanar Tapestry, but I didn't like it. It's supposed to be quasi-Celtic right?
    It stuck me as much more norse than celtic influenced.

    Fionavar Tapestry is probably the most touted and worst GG Kay book out there guys. Tigana is Ok. Lions of Al Rassan is about as good as it gets.

    zeeny on
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    SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    zeeny wrote:
    Senjutsu wrote:
    captaink wrote:
    I tried the first book of the Fiovanar Tapestry, but I didn't like it. It's supposed to be quasi-Celtic right?
    It stuck me as much more norse than celtic influenced.

    Fionavar Tapestry is probably the most touted and worst GG Kay book out there guys. Tigana is Ok. Lions of Al Rassan is about as good as it gets.
    It's his slightest work, but I wouldn't call it bad by any stretch of the imagination. It's better than about 90% of the stuff being recommended in this thread.

    Senjutsu on
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    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Senjutsu wrote:
    zeeny wrote:
    Senjutsu wrote:
    captaink wrote:
    I tried the first book of the Fiovanar Tapestry, but I didn't like it. It's supposed to be quasi-Celtic right?
    It stuck me as much more norse than celtic influenced.

    Fionavar Tapestry is probably the most touted and worst GG Kay book out there guys. Tigana is Ok. Lions of Al Rassan is about as good as it gets.
    It's his slightest work, but I wouldn't call it bad by any stretch of the imagination. It's better than about 90% of the stuff being recommended in this thread.

    Mmm, for me it read a lot like "young adults" fantasy and I find it difficult to appreciate those. Also, I'm thinking this thread has had some superb recommendations so would kindly disagree;o)

    zeeny on
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    Crazy LarryCrazy Larry Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    I've got to agree with everyone who's calling Eddings' work is more or less pure fluff. I've read The Belgariad and The Mallorean, and they struck me as basically nothing more than a second rate D&D fanfic. It's just totally generic and by the numbers. All of the cliches are there - unassuming country lad who turns out to be the chosen one, enigmatic old sorcerer, headstrong barbarian, sneaky, ultra-clever thief, and so on. You could eavesdrop on a random basement game of D&D and find more creativity and innovation in story-telling than Eddings has in all of his writing. All that said, I'm a fantasy junkie, so I read straight through the books anyway, and I'll probably read the rest of his work, but I admit that it's nothing more than a guilty pleasure.

    I'm going to recommend Stephen Donaldson's The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. The main setting of the series is a fairly standard fantasyland with a fairly standard plot, but it's the unconventional main character that makes it unique. It's not for everyone, as the main character can be completely unlikeable at times. If you can accept this though they're a great read. The series itself is broken into two trilogies (both complete), and a third quadrology (I think I may have made that word up), which focuses on the character introduced in the second trilogy, and of which only the first book has been published. I loved the first two trilogies, but I'm not sure about the third, as it struck me somewhat as a cash-in attempt.

    Crazy Larry on
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    GlaealGlaeal Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    I'm going to recommend Stephen Donaldson's The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. The main setting of the series is a fairly standard fantasyland with a fairly standard plot, but it's the unconventional main character that makes it unique. It's not for everyone, as the main character can be completely unlikeable at times. If you can accept this though they're a great read. The series itself is broken into two trilogies (both complete), and a third quadrology (I think I may have made that word up), which focuses on the character introduced in the second trilogy, and of which only the first book has been published. I loved the first two trilogies, but I'm not sure about the third, as it struck me somewhat as a cash-in attempt.

    Thank you. THANK YOU.

    I've been looking for those books forever. All I could remember about them was the main character having Leprosy.

    Glaeal on
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    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    A Song of Ice and Fire, Malazan Book of the Fallen and (from what I hear) The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant are pretty much the best series out there that you could get into, but I don't know if i would recommend them if you're just getting into fantasy.

    Some good old ones I remember are the Prydain Chronicles, Fred Saberhagen's Swords series (there's a bunch of separate books, but I'd start with the Complete Book of Swords), and Robin Hobb's three trilogies. Any one of those would be a good bit to whet your appetite and see what you like.

    Jragghen on
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    Eight RooksEight Rooks Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Senjutsu wrote:
    zeeny wrote:
    Senjutsu wrote:
    captaink wrote:
    I tried the first book of the Fiovanar Tapestry, but I didn't like it. It's supposed to be quasi-Celtic right?
    It stuck me as much more norse than celtic influenced.

    Fionavar Tapestry is probably the most touted and worst GG Kay book out there guys. Tigana is Ok. Lions of Al Rassan is about as good as it gets.
    It's his slightest work, but I wouldn't call it bad by any stretch of the imagination. It's better than about 90% of the stuff being recommended in this thread.

    Damn right. Still, it is his worst, no argument there - is it really his most touted on PA? The Tolkien influences were just overwhelming for me, and I speak as a complete GGK fanboy - there were passages felt like they were ripped wholesale out of LOTR.

    I think for me it'd go Lions of Al-Rassan > Tigana > Sarantine Mosaic > Song For Arbonne > Fionavar Tapestry (I still haven't read Last Light Of The Sun :oops: ). Even then, the Fionavar books just effortlessly crush 90% of the competition; derivative or not,

    [spoiler:db73ae3d76]"Are you really going to leave me?"[/spoiler:db73ae3d76]

    makes the series worth a purchase alone IMO.

    EDIT: And

    [spoiler:db73ae3d76]"But I will take everything."[/spoiler:db73ae3d76]

    Christ, still sends shivers down my spine.

    Eight Rooks on
    <AtlusParker> Sorry I'm playing Pokemon and vomiting at the same time so I'm not following the conversation in a linear fashion.

    Read my book. (It has a robot in it.)
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