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1080i

mellestadmellestad Registered User regular
edited February 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
I am sure this has come up, but a forum search just brought back junk.

So I have seen 1080P tvs with blu ray at Costco and they look amazing.

I just ordered a PS3 to hook up to my 42" 1080i LCD. If I lined it up with a 1080P tv could I tell a difference if they were both playing blu-ray?

mellestad on

Posts

  • WillethWilleth Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    There is a very subtle difference between interlaced and progressive. As I remember it, an interlaced display updates every alternate line every frame, whereas progressive updates every pixel that has changed every frame while not touching the ones that haven't.

    Actually, that doesn't sound right. Someone correct me if I've got this wrong.

    What I do know is that with a 42" TV the difference will be noticeable, but only if you've got the same thing running on two TVs side by side. It'll look incredible either way.

    Willeth on
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  • rfaliasrfalias Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Willeth wrote: »
    There is a very subtle difference between interlaced and progressive. As I remember it, an interlaced display updates every alternate line every frame, whereas progressive updates every pixel that has changed every frame while not touching the ones that haven't.

    Actually, that doesn't sound right. Someone correct me if I've got this wrong.

    What I do know is that with a 42" TV the difference will be noticeable, but only if you've got the same thing running on two TVs side by side. It'll look incredible either way.

    You are correct. Interlace has 2 "fields"; Odd and even. It writes one field at a time. Progressive just does the entire frame in order.

    1080i is not usually considered "true HD", and you are better off running in 720p. (In my opinion).
    Generally speaking 720p TV's also display 1080i.

    rfalias on
  • DHS OdiumDHS Odium Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Generally LCD panels that take 1080i end up resizing to 720p, as that's usually the native resolution it runs at. My 27" LCD TV can take 1080i inputs, but I set everything to run at 720p as that is it's native resolution. You should do the same if your TV is a similar case (LCD panels aren't interlaced, they are always progressive).

    Either way, it depends on the distance you sit from your TV. It's probably fine, and it will look great either way. If I were you, I'd set anything going in to the TV as 720p, sit within 10 ft, and hook the PS3 up with HDMI. You won't be disappointed.

    DHS Odium on
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  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    DHS is right. It depends on how close you're sitting to the TV to recognize it. I picked up a 1080i TV a while back and I was angry at myself for not going the extra mile and getting 1080p, but so far I haven't noticed enough of a difference to justify buying a new 55" TV.

    urahonky on
  • mellestadmellestad Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Thanks guys.

    mellestad on
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Don't forget to calibrate your TV so that the picture looks as good as it actually could.

    Improvolone on
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  • mellestadmellestad Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Any suggestions on calibration? Like a calibration DVD?

    mellestad on
  • jynxycatjynxycat Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    The p, which is progressive scan, is helpful to maintain image quality when there's lots of movement on the screen.

    Games like tiger woods, or some similar game with lots of slow moving/static images would look just fine in 1080 interlaced versus progressive scan.

    Where 1080p shines is fast moving games, things where the screen is constantly redrawing the whole screen. Since, mentioned above, 1080p is refreshing the whole screen every frame, it appears smoother.

    All in all, it's going to look fine unless you directly compare it to another set side by side.


    ps. Like someone else mentioned, setting it to 720p should look better over 1080i. Although, surprisingly, not all 1080i TVs can do 720p, but that's usually just older sets, so you should be able to.

    jynxycat on
  • supabeastsupabeast Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Interlaced video looks fine in scenes with a static background, but it can get really gross when the camera starts moving around and frames play against each other in a way that looks kind of like tearing in video games. IIRC some HD sports coverage is still done in 720p because green generates all kinds of artifacts when this happens.

    supabeast on
  • GihgehlsGihgehls Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Here's the thing about 1080i TVs: If they are a CRT, 1080i is the native resolution, meaning that's the only way the tube can draw its image. If it is an LCD, a 1080i TV's native res is 720p. LCDs don't draw an interlaced signal, they draw a progressive one.

    Without going too far into specifics, an LCD that takes 1080i but not 1080p is a 720p set and should only be run in 720p for the best quality image. It supports 1080i only for the sake of compatibility, so please understand that 1080i on an LCD is NOT a step up from 720p.

    Also, since your question is bout bluray, I'll go ahead and tell you that it totally depends on the movie and the bluray. I've seen some really horrible transfers that looked little better than a DVD, then I've seen some amazing ones.

    Gihgehls on
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  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    I just want to say thanks to everybody who chimed in here...I actually went through and defaulted all my crap to 720p now instead of 1080i, because I was one of the people who thought 1080i was better. Note that my panel actually has a native resolution slightly higher than 720p (1360x768) but I realize now that any theoretical gain from utilizing the full resolution by downscaling from 1080i is likely going to be lost due to interlacing.

    mcdermott on
  • tofutofu Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    1080i is better when there's not a lot of motion on screen.

    tofu on
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