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How do I introduce new players into table top gaming?

Missing a LeggMissing a Legg Registered User regular
edited March 2009 in Critical Failures
How do I introduce new players into table top gaming? My brother and I have been itching to play some good table top games for some time now. But we only have each other on board. We have two friends that are both into similar hobbies, video games, fantasy novels, sci-fi, etc. But both are hesitant to play table top because of the complexity of the systems and the slower pace. I’ve thought about creating all the characters, making cheat sheets, and generally running a fast combat focused campaign. What are your thoughts?

GT:Missing a legg
PSN:Missing_a_legg
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Posts

  • MacGuffinMacGuffin Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Bring a gun, it helps.

    But seriously, make them comfortable, creating the characters, cheat sheets and fast campaigns should really help.
    Treat it like any ordinary board game, and be nice to them if they forget some rules.
    But remember, most table top games are massive time consuming commitment and not everyones piece of cake.

    MacGuffin on
  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    generally running a fast combat focused campaign. What are your thoughts?
    This is an oxymoron, right? There are only a handful of rules-light systems where combat ISN'T a chore that bogs the game down. With combat and new players, you want to keep the rules to a minimum and the encounters as light as possible. As they get more accustomed to rolling dice and doing the motions, you can slowly trickle in more complexity (or not, depending on what system you are using).

    I also wouldn't divorce the prospective new players from character creation, as that's one of the key aspects that draws people into RPGs in the first place. I'd have a sit-down session focused solely on creating characters. And whatever everyone decides to play, create adventures that have each character in some sort of "starring" role at different points of the adventure.

    Make the game a positive experience outside of the actual gaming session. Have free food available. Goof-off. Don't worry about staying focused. What draws people initially into RPGs is similar to the communal fun that people have when playing board games like Risk and Monopoly.

    Hahnsoo1 on
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  • RendRend Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    If you go for 4th edition D&D, then combat is a total blast, as well as being the focus of most of the book. However, rules light is not the game, so if that turns you off, then you may want to steer clear of it. However, to its benefit, it is almost the same as a cooperative wargame. If your friends play warhammer, warmachine, heroclix, etc etc etc then you may have a great deal of success with D&D4e.

    You may want to describe your group in more detail here: tailoring to their interest will be vital if you're trying to get players who are leery of the hobby into tabletop'ing.

    Rend on
  • Missing a LeggMissing a Legg Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I felt that a more combat focused game would be a easier transition from video games to table top games, armor ratings, attack bonuses, etc. I also had planned on keeping the mood very light hearted, beer and pizza is a guarantee.

    Missing a Legg on
    GT:Missing a legg
    PSN:Missing_a_legg
  • RendRend Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Plugging D&D4 again, I think it is a really good transition from video games to tabletop. It's very gamey, and the combat is surprisingly tactical and fun.

    I will agree with Hahnsoo about character creation, however the way you do it is important. It's key that the players feel the character is their own, but you don't want to bore them with chargen before they even start the game. However you decide to do it, though, just make sure the end product ends with them and a character they are satisfied with.

    Keep the game moving, too. Fast paced is good when you're trying to keep interest. If you ever spend more than 30 seconds looking something up, houserule it and move on: keep a list so you can look them up after the game. And always house rule in the players' favor, it'll keep them creative, and honestly, I mean why not?

    Rend on
  • Missing a LeggMissing a Legg Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    yeah I tend to play in favor of the players, if they are happy, I am happy.


    Also I was thinking of bringing mini's/battle maps, maybe some detailed art work to fit the mood.

    Missing a Legg on
    GT:Missing a legg
    PSN:Missing_a_legg
  • RendRend Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Some form of battle grid and miniature is required for D&D4. Most other games, you can abstract it quite a bit.

    Rend on
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