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What are we reading?

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Posts

  • CheeselikerCheeseliker Registered User regular
    I'm reading @ruzkin Century of Sand and it's pretty awesome. It was on my wishlist and my mom got it for me for christmas and I am finally getting around to reading it. Will be putting up a review once I finish. It's really good gritty fantasy.

    bigrickcook
  • bigrickcookbigrickcook Dord of Lance? OklahomaRegistered User regular
    Nice, Cheeseliker! I actually had a lot of trouble getting into Century of Sand, but by the end of it I was hooked. Our dear Ruz can tune a scene for tension better than almost anybody I've ever read.

    http://panningforclouds.com
    Panning For Clouds, a writing blog dedicated to my fiction and writing columns! Updates at least twice a week.
  • MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    I am awaiting Calamity with a lot of anticipation.

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    PSN: AuthorFrost
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    vamenazith28
  • ruzkinruzkin Registered User regular
    Hey @Cheeseliker! Thanks so much for giving CoS a go :) I'm just diving back into work on book 3 at the moment, so it's a real nice boost to hear about people enjoying book 1.

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  • azith28azith28 Registered User regular
    vamen wrote: »
    Not normally my type of book, but I've been on a superhero book kick of late. Probably in preps for Calamity coming out really soon. I read the entire Ex-Heroes series which was great fun, and then I read The Never Hero, which I guess I enjoyed until I looked back and realized SO much of the book is a guy trying to workout. I have enough problems going to the gym in my real life, I don't want to read about it =p.

    But with Calamity soon and also Bands of Mourning tomorrow it should be a good few weeks.

    Just in case you werent aware, the Ex heroes series just got a new book a few days ago. It wasnt really advertised, i stumbled across it, its called Ex-Island. I'm waiting for my amazon delivery.

    Bands of Mourning was great. it certainly went places i was not expecting, then had a huge surprise of another book to read at the end of it.

  • DissentDissent Mr. Fancy Pants Flavour CountryRegistered User regular
    Books of the moment:
    Toilet Book: Barely Composed: Poems--Alice Fulton
    Bed Book: American Pastoral--Phillip Roth
    Couch Book: The Theory of the Leisure Class--Thorstein Veblen
    Car Book: Sugar House Review #12

  • Megaton HopeMegaton Hope Registered User regular
    I just finished Garth Nix's "Old Kingdom" trilogy. It's a fantasy series with an interesting magical system; Nix's world-building was focused on the balance between "Life" and "Death," with Death being a malevolent force trying to devour and replace Life. "The Dead" are spirits who have refused to go on to their final destination, and have to consume the energy of living beings to sustain themselves and grow more powerful. (They're also more generally evil; the "Greater Dead," who were once powerful necromancers, are actively and intelligently malicious.) They only fear flowing water and Charter Magic. Charter Mages use Charter Marks in different combinations to achieve magical effects; those marks are a kind of building block of creation, so a sufficiently powerful Charter Mage can, say, banish a spirit from a dead body and burn the body, or turn into an owl.

    The world-building was interesting, if a bit mushy. I think that I found the idea of "Charter Magic" (created by an ancient alliance of spirits against one very powerful and malevolent spirit) and "Free Magic" (magic existing outside the Charter) the most compelling. There were some unusual details, like necromancers using seven magical bells to bind the Dead to do different things, but as far as I was concerned that was just window dressing.

    The first book (Sabriel) was probably the best read for me. What I liked the most about the last one was actually that Nix gave an annotated list of his favorite books from childhood at the end. Since I haven't heard of some of those authors, that was a real treat.

    Previously, I had read Patrick Rothfuss's "The Name of the Wind" and "The Wise Man's Fear," which also has a really cool magic (well, science) system. I quite liked the way both series handled artificing. Felt like there was a lot of grit in it.

    Going to move on to more research on Arthurian Legend, Celtic myths and medieval history next. Though Tad Williams' "War of the Flowers" is next on my list for fantasy. And re-reading Robert Heinlein's "Tunnel in the Sky" on the bus now that I've got The Old Kingdom squared away. (Can't read dry stuff on the bus.)

  • Big DookieBig Dookie Smells great! Houston, TXRegistered User regular
    Didn't realize the big atheist kick I've been on lately. Finished The God Delusion and God Is Not Great, and started Fighting God. Good God!

    Also finished Endymion, and now getting ready to start Rise of Endymion to finally finish out the Hyperion Cantos. Endymion was cool, but definitely not as good as the first two books. I'm hoping for a strong finish with the final book.

    I mostly just wish I could wipe my brain and go back and read Hyperion again for the first time.

  • JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Registered User regular
    edited February 2016
    I just read The Sorcerer of the WIldeeps and it was pretty cool. It's like an afro-punk science fantasy thing. Basically imagine a world where a few people are essentially the descendants of Space Marines and the rest of the population see them in religions terms.

    It's a little bit like if the RZA and Glenn Cook wrote a novel together

    @azith28 if you're still looking for suggestions, Craig Schaffer's Daniel Faust series, starting with The Long Way Down, are probably in your wheelhouse

    JohnnyCache on
  • Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    I just found out my favorite author ever, Tanith Lee, died of breast cancer in May of last year. I'll need to start up Tales from the Flat earth again. :cry:

    Koreg
  • QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    Recently reread Spindle's End by Robin McKinley, and read Rimrunners by CJ Cherryh. Both are recommended. The Cherryh book has some unpleasant rape stuff in it, but moves past that quickly enough.

    This week, I'm teaching two stories in class: "Help Me Follow My Sister into the Land of the Dead" by Carmen Maria Machado, and "26 Monkeys, Also The Abyss" by Kij Johnson. Current unit is on narrative design, so I think these two work well to show how you can tell a story in a novel way.

    tapeslinger
  • QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    Last week's class stories: "The Case of the Passionless Bees" and "Love Is the Plan the Plan Is Death" for the unit on characterization.

    Next week: "Immersion" and "The Ticket Taker of Cenote Zací" for the unit on worldbuilding.

    tapeslinger
  • QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
  • chiasaur11chiasaur11 Never doubt a raccoon. Registered User regular
    Thanks, Quoth! Been meaning to pick up my reading a little, and those seem like just the thing.

    Last thing I read offline was the play "The Pillowman", by the writer of "In Bruges". Quite good. Very clever dialog, as expected. And not quite as grim as it could be.

  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger Registered User regular
    I spend more time reading about how fucking insane the 1950s were than I spend reading 11/22/63

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    Just read "Fire in the Belly" and it feels more like the first part of a serial or the first chapter of a novel than a short story. And yet it does end the arc it begins, so.

  • KoregKoreg Registered User regular
    I just tore through Charles Stross' Laundry Files.

    I loved these books. It's like if the Dresden Files and HP Lovecraft had a baby. Now to find something new...

  • InkhandInkhand Registered User regular
    Just finished Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie. It's a good book, though not quite the same as the first in the series. Now I need to get my hands on the next one... Ancillary Mercy, I think it's called. The thrilling conclusion!

  • MrGrimoireMrGrimoire Pixflare Registered User regular
    Blasted through A Natural History of Dragons and Tropics of Serpents. Both written in the style of an elderly Victorian lady's memoires as she gallivants all over a fantasy world to study dragons, while giving absolutely no fucks about propriety.

    Also read through Three Body Problem. I can see why it got a pile of awards, and I'm definitely getting the rest of the book.

  • QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    Finished City of Blades last night. If you like City of Stairs, it's definitely a good continuation. Bennett's voice is possibly the Platonic ideal of what I'm trying to achieve in my current novel.

    MrGrimoiretapeslinger
  • majanzmajanz Registered User regular
    Been re-reading the classics, lately going with Ernest Hemingway's 'The Sun Also Rises'. (GO BULLS! GET THAT GUY WITH THE CAPE!) Its a nice change from my usual diet of hard sci-fi mixed with science fantasy and a dash of regular old vanilla fantasy.

    Papa Hemingway's curt-minimalist writing style is so different from anyone I usually read. Its interesting, but I don't think very many writers could make it work.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iceberg_Theory

  • KoregKoreg Registered User regular
    Started Gary Gibson's Stealing Light. Only a few pages in, but the aliens in it are quite ridiculous with names like Squat-Devourer-Of-Enemy-Corpses and Trader-In-Faecel-Matter-Of-Animals.

  • chiasaur11chiasaur11 Never doubt a raccoon. Registered User regular
    Finally got around to the Southern Reach trilogy, which I'd been meaning to go for for a while now.

    Done with Annihilation. Onto Authority!

  • ruzkinruzkin Registered User regular
    I loooooved the Southern Reach trilogy. I have major trouble recommending it to others, though - it is at times so slow and dense that it feels like it's trying to push the reader away.

    And yet, it's awesome.

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  • chiasaur11chiasaur11 Never doubt a raccoon. Registered User regular
    ruzkin wrote: »
    I loooooved the Southern Reach trilogy. I have major trouble recommending it to others, though - it is at times so slow and dense that it feels like it's trying to push the reader away.

    And yet, it's awesome.

    Just finished Authority, and I know what you mean. It's... dense. And most of the horror is more lurking than direct, even when it is direct.

    (Funny thing about Authority. I took a glance at it before starting on the series in earnest, and thought I managed to spoil both it and Annihilation. I was very, very wrong.)

  • MrGrimoireMrGrimoire Pixflare Registered User regular
    Southern Reach is my current bus reading book. I'm a bit past the middle of the second book by now. I feel it benefits from shorter readings, as it gives more time to digest what I've just been through.

  • bigrickcookbigrickcook Dord of Lance? OklahomaRegistered User regular
    Finished Elizabeth Haydon's The Merchant Emperor, like the 8th book in the Symphony of Ages fantasy series.

    I had a really hard time getting through it. The writing style is so flowery and superfluous, and there were a ton of typos for a traditionally published work. I don't remember the other books in the series being this bad on either account, and I'm afraid to go back and read them to find out.

    http://panningforclouds.com
    Panning For Clouds, a writing blog dedicated to my fiction and writing columns! Updates at least twice a week.
  • chiasaur11chiasaur11 Never doubt a raccoon. Registered User regular
    edited August 2016
    MrGrimoire wrote: »
    Southern Reach is my current bus reading book. I'm a bit past the middle of the second book by now. I feel it benefits from shorter readings, as it gives more time to digest what I've just been through.

    Good choice. The trilogy is excellent. Just don't expect the ending to explain everything. It's satisfying, I think, but... it keeps a lot of the mystery.

    As for my part, after a long period without a book to focus on, I finished Ulysses.

    It's rubbish.

    chiasaur11 on
  • Satanic JesusSatanic Jesus In a library with broken glasses Registered User regular
    So I went into the local bookshop looking for The Republic of Thieves but they didn't have so I picked up Clariel by Garth Nix instead (I was meaning to pick that up at some point too). Bought it on friday, finished it on saturday. Now to wait for Goldenhand

    my backloggery 3DS: 0533-5338-5186 steam: porcelain_cow
  • CheeselikerCheeseliker Registered User regular
    chiasaur11 wrote: »
    MrGrimoire wrote: »
    Southern Reach is my current bus reading book. I'm a bit past the middle of the second book by now. I feel it benefits from shorter readings, as it gives more time to digest what I've just been through.

    Good choice. The trilogy is excellent. Just don't expect the ending to explain everything. It's satisfying, I think, but... it keeps a lot of the mystery.

    As for my part, after a long period without a book to focus on, I finished Ulysses.

    It's rubbish.

    Nice. I will read it at some point and likely come to the same conclusion!

  • MagellMagell Sphinx! Parts UnknownRegistered User regular
    Finished Seven Eves by Neal Stephenson a while ago and I enjoyed a lot of it until the latter third. Still a good book, if you like Stephenson's style. The latter third has both too much explanation of some aspects, and nowhere near enough of other aspects. It's still a cool read though.

  • mark120593mark120593 Registered User
    edited September 2016
    my all time favorite : rich dad poor dad
    the girl on the train
    it happens for a reason.
    you must read these novels.you would really enjoy.

    mark120593 on
  • GyralGyral Registered User regular
    Reading Ringworld for the first time. Been on a classic sci-fi kick as of late.

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  • DoctorJestDoctorJest Grand Eedjit The Loony BinRegistered User regular
    My current book of choice is Black House, by Stephen King and Peter Straub. I enjoyed the Talisman, so I have high hopes for it.

    A Dabble Of Thelonius
  • DesmondPfeifferDesmondPfeiffer The secret diary of- Registered User regular
    Whelp, I fell off the face of the earth for about a year, which is pretty long, even by my standards. Hopefully I didn't worry anyone, though I know I'm not a prolific enough person on these forums to probably even have had my absence noticed. Anyway, prominent things I've read over the past 11 months (which I will spoiler for length):
    Best Served Cold by Joe Abercrombie - I was actually really disappointed in this book. I didn't hate it, but I didn't like it particularly either. I feel like it is the worse than the three books in the First Law Trilogy, which by a cursory look around the internet seems to put me in the vast minority. That's fine. I just didn't like the character's enough to really care what happened to any of them, which is a bit rare for me. Hopefully The Heroes will be better once I finally get around to that one.

    Echopraxia by Peter Watts - Another super cool, sleek sci-fi mind bender of a read. I like Blindsight better, but this was still a very interesting one that made me stop and think, a lot. As with Blindsight, if you like sci-fi that really engages your mind, and won't leave you alone long after you finish it, I would recommend it.

    Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne by Brian Staveley- Three books in this one, read them mostly back to back. I liked this series more than I ever would have expected going into it. The three protagonists were all great for different reasons, and all of them went through some amazing character development through the course of the series. Nothing stayed static, from ideals to loyalties. It was nice reading a series where the characters in it legitimately change from the things that they experience. Also, it has special forces that ride giant birds into battle, so that's pretty cool.

    Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton - Read this book as a sort of book exchange with my fiance. I read this, one of her favorites, and she read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (originally was supposed to be Neuromancer, but she couldn't get into the prose, so PKD was the fallback). I was surprised by how much I didn't actually like this book. I love the movie, but the book's pacing is kind of garbage after the characters actually get to the island. I would say the pacing and story is better set up in the beginning in the novel, but about a third or halfway through, I found myself wishing it was more like the movie. This is pretty odd for me, as I think it's the only book I've read where I outright liked the movie better.

    No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy - My last posts on here were concerning Blood Meridian and that I liked it enough to check out some of McCarthy's other books, and that I most certainly did. First off, the movie adaptation of this book is one of my favorites of all time. It joined the ranks of Chinatown, Blade Runner, Alien, and a couple other mostly older films that I regard as my favorites. I was surprised and kind of relieved when I found the book was so close to the movie initially, largely only being different in the fact that the dialogue was expanded (of course) in the book in many parts. The last third though played out quite a bit differently, and it was an interesting change. I would give the book a bit of an edge over the film just by virtue of the fact that in the book you get a much better appreciation for Sheriff Bell's character and what makes him who he is. Bell really does feel like the protagonist in the book, which was different, as the movie I feel like it weighed more heavily in favor of Moss. All the characters had expanded parts in the book though, and I came away with a better appreciation for all of the main players. I think it actually enhanced my appreciation for the film too.

    A Dabble Of TheloniusvamenVisenGod
  • DesmondPfeifferDesmondPfeiffer The secret diary of- Registered User regular
    Back already! I just finished Starfish by Peter Watts. Also liked this one. The main character was probably the most standout aspect of it, as it is rare that I see such a broken psyche so effectively translated. I genuinely felt empathy for the character, despite being so alien to anyone I've ever known or likely will know.

    It's a shame that Peter Watts seems to be right on the outskirts of actual popularity within the genre. He has very rapidly become one of my favorite Sci-fi authors. Or maybe he is popular and I just don't visit the right places that talk about science fiction?

  • liquiddarkliquiddark Odd magpie St. John's, NLRegistered User regular
    Peopleware and Angel Catbird Vol 1 right now. Last thing I read was Secret Path, which is the first Canadian book in a while that sits where it does - a high-profile book that says something that matters and challenges Canada directly. It's a good piece of work, particularly in context - Joseph Boyden and A Tribe Called Red both put out material on the same story the same day.

    Current project: Contension, a realtime tactics game for mobile
    @oldmanhero .programming .web comic .everything
  • thlipsisthlipsis Registered User new member
    I'm reading Odd Thomas Apocalypse. I stepped away from the series for a few years, now I got a nice backlog.

    milani
  • VirtualEarthOnline VirtualEarthOnline AustraliaRegistered User regular
    A few books in to the Bosch series. Awesome detective books by Michael Connelly

    "Health, Wealth, Happiness and Love" ... and the abundance of all four! :D

    Virtual Earth Online, Live and Online. This is Only The Beginning. 8-)
    www.virtualearthonline.com
    Instagram: @virtualearthonlinethegame

    A Dabble Of Thelonius
  • JuggernutJuggernut South CurrrrlinaRegistered User regular
    edited January 26
    I'm currently on my first foray into Hemingway with "The Sun Also Rises."

    I'm about halfway through and my current consensus is that I hate all of these characters with the sole exception of Bill and that one Spanish guy on the bus.

    It's a biting portrayal of the lost and the lonely lunging about from pleasure to pleasure trying to fill the void but good heavens are they absolute assholes.

    Juggernut on
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