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My friend is addicted to WoW

proXimityproXimity Registered User regular
edited April 2009 in Debate and/or Discourse
Title says it all. We're roommates at college, and almost this entire year, he's been addicted to WoW. It's become incredibly aggravating to me and our other roommate. We see him sit there, at almost every waking hour of the day when he's not in class. I'm pretty sure he's still doing decently in his classes, but it's pitiful seeing him do nothing else. At the beginning of the year, he bought a bass guitar and amp (~$400!) with the intent of learning how to play it, he's hardly touched it in the past half year. I'm sure many of you have felt the effects of an MMO addiction, be it a friend of yours or yourself, so I won't go into more detail unless asked.

So basically, how do I get my friend to lose his addiction to WoW?

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Posts

  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    All you can do is invite and encourage him to do stuff with you guys. You can point out that he's in college, he'll only be going through this once, and he's wasting it.

    If he chooses not to listen to you, though, there's really nothing you can do about it. Continue inviting him, but don't push. You're not his parents, he's a big boy, and he can make whatever tragically stupid decisions about his life he wants to.

    Thanatos on
  • ApexMirageApexMirage Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    As an ex addict, I can only tell you that it's an uphill battle for both you and him - A good idea would be to have as much fun as you possibly can right in his face, hopefully making him want to join in. It's almost worse than kicking smoking, you're going to have to ween him off little by little.

    Honestly it's in his best interest to quit the damn thing, and as a friend you practically owe it to him to help him quit.

    You're really in a gray area, you can try to show him how much better life is without WoW, or you can hinder his experience for his own good. I'm NOT advocating it, but I've heard stories of sabotage working both ways in these situations - some give up entirely, some redouble their efforts to get back to where they were.

    Tread carefully.

    ApexMirage on
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  • noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    proXimity wrote: »
    Title says it all. We're roommates at college, and almost this entire year, he's been addicted to WoW. It's become incredibly aggravating to me and our other roommate. We see him sit there, at almost every waking hour of the day when he's not in class. I'm pretty sure he's still doing decently in his classes, but it's pitiful seeing him do nothing else. At the beginning of the year, he bought a bass guitar and amp (~$400!) with the intent of learning how to play it, he's hardly touched it in the past half year. I'm sure many of you have felt the effects of an MMO addiction, be it a friend of yours or yourself, so I won't go into more detail unless asked.

    So basically, how do I get my friend to lose his addiction to WoW?

    How is it any of your business? Yes, he's your friend and all, but at the end of the day, what he's doing is incredibly passive and doesn't really affect you.

    Less he starts to stink from not taking a bath or something.

    noir_blood on
  • ApexMirageApexMirage Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Friends don't let friends play wow =(

    ApexMirage on
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  • Element BrianElement Brian Peanut Butter Shill Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    noir_blood wrote: »
    proXimity wrote: »
    Title says it all. We're roommates at college, and almost this entire year, he's been addicted to WoW. It's become incredibly aggravating to me and our other roommate. We see him sit there, at almost every waking hour of the day when he's not in class. I'm pretty sure he's still doing decently in his classes, but it's pitiful seeing him do nothing else. At the beginning of the year, he bought a bass guitar and amp (~$400!) with the intent of learning how to play it, he's hardly touched it in the past half year. I'm sure many of you have felt the effects of an MMO addiction, be it a friend of yours or yourself, so I won't go into more detail unless asked.

    So basically, how do I get my friend to lose his addiction to WoW?

    How is it any of your business? Yes, he's your friend and all, but at the end of the day, what he's doing is incredibly passive and doesn't really affect you.

    Less he starts to stink from not taking a bath or something.

    This man is completely wrong and you should not listen to him.

    Honesty is the best policy here. Casually bring it up, but don't push him. (Especially don't sabotage him as people have mentioned before, because theres a high chance that will just piss him off and make him not want to be your friend). Let him know how you feel. Invite him to do stuff, and especially make him feel needed. As a formal WoW addict I know that sometimes I totally rationalized "I'm the preist! They need me" But in all honesty they can find someone else. But you can show that you do need him. You need him as a friend and you need him to enjoy your social life at college.

    If he knows that you guys WANT him to do stuff with you, then he should feel as more part of the group. I think part of the reason that he could let it get this bad is that he possibly didn't feel too accepted before, if he didn't feel as accepted or as wanted, then he might of possibly have used WoW as a substitute.

    All in all, just try your best to make him feel included, and especially wanted and needed. Let him see his self worth.

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  • CrashtardCrashtard Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    Friends don't let friends play wow =(

    This, sigh. I'm easily responsibly for at least 30 people being completely addicted to WoW, and it makes me feel sad in my soul.

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  • MunacraMunacra Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Oh stop being melodramatic. He's not hurting you in any way. If he likes the videogame, let him enjoy it. Stop being overbearing and righteous asses.

    Munacra on
  • DrakeonDrakeon Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Crashtard wrote: »
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    Friends don't let friends play wow =(

    This, sigh. I'm easily responsibly for at least 30 people being completely addicted to WoW, and it makes me feel sad in my soul.

    Holy shit, 30 people? How did you get 30 people addicted to WoW? I mean, I could see 5, maybe 10, but 30? Were you like on a campaign to get all your friends playing WoW?

    Drakeon on
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  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited April 2009
    Honestly the only real advice to give is exactly what Thanatos said. Just continue to invite him out to whatever social things you are doing, and make sure he knows what he is missing out on by not going after the fact.

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with playing WoW or any other online/offline game, and it's not your responsibility to monitor and determine what your friend/roommate does to have fun (and really it's on his shoulders to realize what he is missing out on).


    I have friends who play MMOs for a couple hours most weeknights to unwind after work, but still go out on the weekends. I have friends who play a lot more and don't go out as often (but they were never big partyers to begin with). I even have a friend who I rarely converse with outside of Skype nowadays because of his gaming habits but you know what? That's his decision, and he's pretty satisfied with it. No skin off my back.

    Unknown User on
  • INeedNoSaltINeedNoSalt with blood on my teeth Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Munacra wrote: »
    Oh stop being melodramatic. He's not hurting you in any way. If he likes the videogame, let him enjoy it. Stop being overbearing and righteous asses.

    obviously someone who has never lost a friend to WoW

    INeedNoSalt on
  • MunacraMunacra Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    aha.

    Munacra on
  • DotDotDashDotDotDash Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Not a WoW player here, but I'm constantly amazed at how some people tend to get righteous about it.

    So your buddy is 'addicted' to WoW and spends every waking hour sitting in front of his PC.

    So I ask you - replace "WoW" with "reading books" or "painting" - would you feel compelled to intervene? He spends every waking hour curled up on the couch reading and not playing bass guitar or throwing the frisbee around or whatever socially acceptable activity you deem is appropriate.

    Does this mandate soul saving?

    DotDotDash on
  • Element BrianElement Brian Peanut Butter Shill Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    DotDotDash wrote: »
    Not a WoW player here, but I'm constantly amazed at how some people tend to get righteous about it.

    So your buddy is 'addicted' to WoW and spends every waking hour sitting in front of his PC.

    So I ask you - replace "WoW" with "reading books" or "painting" - would you feel compelled to intervene? He spends every waking hour curled up on the couch reading and not playing bass guitar or throwing the frisbee around or whatever socially acceptable activity you deem is appropriate.

    Does this mandate soul saving?

    I've literally seen WoW nearly destroy some peoples marriages. I can't imagine books doing that same thing.

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  • proXimityproXimity Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    noir_blood wrote: »
    How is it any of your business? Yes, he's your friend and all, but at the end of the day, what he's doing is incredibly passive and doesn't really affect you.

    Less he starts to stink from not taking a bath or something.
    Munacra wrote: »
    Oh stop being melodramatic. He's not hurting you in any way. If he likes the videogame, let him enjoy it. Stop being overbearing and righteous asses.

    Up to a point I tend to agree with that. I love gaming myself, and the occasional binge is all in good fun. But when it's taken up a huge part of his life, an addiction, it would be irresponsible as a friend to just let it go. I can put up with a ton of crap from people, and the fact that he's driven me this far should speak to the fact that it is a problem.

    You say it doesn't affect or hurt me in anyway. Bullshit. I hate to sound like a butthurt scorned lover, but it's really shitty when your friend hardly does anything with you anymore, and yes, that does hurt. Case in point, I got him to start DMing a D&D campaign this past weekend, and what does he do? He starts a raid while we were rolling our chars, and continued the raid for another two hours after all four of us were ready to start playing because he had "made a commitment". He has since decided to not DM any more because I called him out on making some godawful decisions (he blue lightning'd some stuff that happened in order to give another player a chance to kill mine). I've known him for a couple years, and honestly, he would not have quit over something like that a year ago, but now he'd rather just play WoW instead of putting in a little bit of work to DM.

    He's also hurting himself. He's been eating less and less, and he is DAMN thin to start with.

    So, noir_blood, Munacra, and anybody else who wants to offer such advice, please kindly keep your fingers off the keyboard. I'm not interested in people telling me to sit and do nothing.

    proXimity on
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  • eternalbleternalbl Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    DotDotDash wrote: »
    Does this mandate soul saving?

    Yes! But unfortunately all you can do is make sure he has options to go out. And don't take it personally, MMOs are addictive, or at least encourage spending hours upon hours grinding. So keep inviting him even if you get shot down all the time. Eventually he'll see that its a huge time sink and will quit because he has better things to do with his friends.

    eternalbl on
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  • NappuccinoNappuccino Surveyor of Things and Stuff Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Wow is like legal crack. Sometimes you can't get people to forget about it even when they are away from it. Some people won't eat because of it. Some have died for that reason....

    That usually doesn't happen with any other hobby.

    Now, I don't know if this person's roomate is anywhere near that dedicated/ addicted but seriously, social interaction is a vital part of human life. It'd be a good idea to get him to do somethings with others.

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  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    DotDotDash wrote: »
    Not a WoW player here, but I'm constantly amazed at how some people tend to get righteous about it.

    So your buddy is 'addicted' to WoW and spends every waking hour sitting in front of his PC.

    So I ask you - replace "WoW" with "reading books" or "painting" - would you feel compelled to intervene? He spends every waking hour curled up on the couch reading and not playing bass guitar or throwing the frisbee around or whatever socially acceptable activity you deem is appropriate.

    Does this mandate soul saving?
    If my friend and roommate were doing nothing but reading books or painting when he wasn't in class? Spending all his time in his room, never leaving, never going out and socializing with everyone? I would absolutely feel compelled to intervene.

    It's not healthy, and it's sad to see it happen to a friend who you care about.

    Thanatos on
  • Feels Good ManFeels Good Man Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Are you guys seriously comparing painting and reading to playing World of Warcraft? Incredible.

    Anyway, do not be aggressive or too pushy about getting him to come with you to do something because he will be incredibly defensive about it. Thanatos pretty much has the right idea. Try to include him in shit but don't call him out unless it's just in passing to make him think about it himself.

    Feels Good Man on
  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Are you guys seriously comparing painting and reading to playing World of Warcraft? Incredible.

    I think it's a fair comparison, except for the fact that I've never known anybody so addicted to such activities that they'd completely neglect their social life.

    But if they were? I'd have the same reaction.

    mcdermott on
  • Delicious SteveDelicious Steve Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    You want to do what several other people have already said to do, ask him to come out for a night, or to go do something else with you and friends, be nice, be casual, don't nag, there's no better way to keep him in there than to whine about how he never goes out.

    If he's having problems that may be affecting his health though you should have a more stern talk to him, possibly ask a counselor what to do about a friend with a bad addiction, tell his family you're concerned about his health etc. By affecting his health i mean gaining a lot of weight, eating really poorly, putting off showering and brushing his teeth to play, or whatever other complications come from playing it too often.

    Also painting and reading tends to have a beginning, middle and end. It eventually ceases. You play an MMO until you get bored of it.

    Delicious Steve on
  • SanderJKSanderJK Crocodylus Pontifex Sinterklasicus Madrid, 3000 ADRegistered User regular
    edited April 2009
    If he's that addicted, he's raiding, probably at a fairly high level. It would be hard to get him to quit raiding (Especially with new raiding content being released next week), so your best bet is to introduce options for him to do outside of his raiding time. Find out what those hours are (usually, 4-5 nights of 4 hour sessions), and see if you can plan social stuff outside that timeframe. After playing this long, his main character will have little to progress outside of raiding anyway. Get him to do other stuff outside of raiding first.

    Also be aware that if he's committed to raiding, chances are it'll be hard to take him to stuff "on the fly." Because it's a 25man commitment, he won't join you for a beer if he's playing currently, that'd be a breach of raider protocol, so to say. But if you ask him to go see a movie in a few days, chances are he can arrange that.

    Ultimately, most raiders only stop playing WoW when real life absolutely dictates it, or when they burn out on the game. (Almost all do eventually)

    SanderJK on
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  • RazielRaziel Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    My god this is interesting.

    Right. You say he plays WoW a lot. He attends classes, he isn't in danger of dropping out over the game, which means he still has his priorities straight on that end.

    Are you sure you're not just jealous of the game? It's not my intention to trivialize the problem, but by the sound of it you're more angry that your roommate would rather play WoW than play D&D.

    The point here is that your friend is an adult or, failing that, at least independent. You're not responsible for his well-being, and it's not up to you to go crying intervention. If you're overly confrontational about this, you risk alienating your friend. If you're passive-aggressive about it, you risk alienating your friend. In short, you should make it clear that you want him to join you and your other friends. If he refuses, you should respect his wishes.

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  • The Muffin ManThe Muffin Man Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Munacra wrote: »
    Oh stop being melodramatic. He's not hurting you in any way. If he likes the videogame, let him enjoy it. Stop being overbearing and righteous asses.
    This.
    Is he ACTUALLY addicted, or is he addicted in that he likes the game and you don't?

    Nothing personal against you, it just seems that the two camps are "I love WoW" and "WoW is Evil in MMORPG form"
    If my friend and roommate were doing nothing but reading books or painting when he wasn't in class? Spending all his time in his room, never leaving, never going out and socializing with everyone? I would absolutely feel compelled to intervene.

    It's not healthy, and it's sad to see it happen to a friend who you care about.
    I'd like to call bullshit on this.

    The Muffin Man on
  • Indica1Indica1 Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Reading and painting have fuck all in common with grinding epic loots. How can people seriously make this comparison?

    Time spent reading and painting helps you grow mentally. Time spend playing WoW.... Well, it might not make you more of a creepy shut in wierdo. Perhaps.

    Anyway, if he wants to piss his life away, it's not really your problem. Tell him that WoW made him a creepy shut in weirdo, that's about all you can do.

    Indica1 on

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  • RazielRaziel Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Yeah, indica pretty much nailed it.

    The thing with WoW is that everything takes so damn long to do. Every action is dragged out to the edges of patience, and filled with just enough positive reinforcement that you don't quite get bored. You can't just farm herbs or whatever for fifteen minutes.

    He's probably not "addicted", because comparing WoW to meth is fatuous. Rather, he probably has poor time management skills. And you're not his mother.

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  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited April 2009
    Unless he skips out on classes or other important events, I think you're projecting. Skipping D&D for WoW is like saying he wont play smash brothers ever night now because he bought Oblivion. If hes spending the same amount of time gaming, but has ditched you for a solitary experience, that's not an addiction. You're Feeling are hurt, but he can game alone if he wants to. His eating habits may also be unrelated to the game.


    As a former WoW player, I know its a time waster and it is addictive, but I've also realized that I still waste decent amounts of time doing other things. Just because I don't game doesn't mean I'm infinitely more social and productive, I just have developed different habits. I'm not saying you shouldn't encourage him to quit, there are alot of other experiences to have in college. But at the same time you should acknowledge that there's more than one way to be happy. Do it out of legitimate concern for his well being and not because you assume WoW is bad and you want him to play D&D.

    Iruka on
  • ApexMirageApexMirage Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    A lot of you are severely underestimating how addictive and debilitating WoW can be. The problem is just like any addiction, it really falls back on the type of person you are. Some people have an addictive personality, while some simply don't. There are extreme cases, where the game ruins lives, and there are cases that have players investing a few hours a week.

    Just like any addiction, There are varying levels. Having a few drinks socially can be good fun, which isn't necessarily an addiction per se, while drinking hard liquor first thing in the morning is going to cause you some serious harm.

    We can't be the judge on how much his friend plays, as we're obviously not there to make that call. If he claims his friend is addicted, than I'm sure he has a basis for it. Let's not argue on whether It's his problem or his call, but rather how he can help his friend out, because after all, that's what friends are for. Helping each other.

    ApexMirage on
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  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    If my friend and roommate were doing nothing but reading books or painting when he wasn't in class? Spending all his time in his room, never leaving, never going out and socializing with everyone? I would absolutely feel compelled to intervene.

    It's not healthy, and it's sad to see it happen to a friend who you care about.
    I'd like to call bullshit on this.
    I'm sure you would. However, if one of my friends were constantly ditching out on social activities to read a book by himself constantly, I would absolutely be talking to him about his problem, because he is clearly suffering from either some form of severe social anxiety or depression.

    Thanatos on
  • kaliyamakaliyama Left to find less-moderated fora Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Iruka wrote: »
    Unless he skips out on classes or other important events, I think you're projecting. Skipping D&D for WoW is like saying he wont play smash brothers ever night now because he bought Oblivion. If hes spending the same amount of time gaming, but has ditched you for a solitary experience, that's not an addiction. You're Feeling are hurt, but he can game alone if he wants to. His eating habits may also be unrelated to the game.


    As a former WoW player, I know its a time waster and it is addictive, but I've also realized that I still waste decent amounts of time doing other things. Just because I don't game doesn't mean I'm infinitely more social and productive, I just have developed different habits. I'm not saying you shouldn't encourage him to quit, there are alot of other experiences to have in college. But at the same time you should acknowledge that there's more than one way to be happy. Do it out of legitimate concern for his well being and not because you assume WoW is bad and you want him to play D&D.

    The OP referenced an entirely neglected amp and guitar. What isn't troubling is that he's preferring one game over another, it's that, IN THE MIDDLE OF A D&D SESSION, with real, live people, he starts to ignore them and play a computer game. That's a serious compulsion, and even if you want to quibble with the addiction thing it's a problem. (The semi-random dispensing of rewards via loot drops is classic and highly effective operant conditioning - even if he's not addicted, the game is custom-built to manipulate you into playing longer than you should.)

    Playing too much of any game be a function of existing anxiety, depression or feelings of helplessness in a school environment - in which case the WoW playing is a sign of existing deeper problems that he escapes via the easy feelings of accomplishment attainable in WoW without having to engage the stressors in his life. Alternatively, it could just be the addictive qualities of WoW have hooked him, but it's going to continually isolate him socially in college, which a) is going to suck if he's a lonely shut-in, and b) can easily lead to depression and feelings of isolation which can affect his academic performance.

    You can try to talk to him about this, but this seems pretty far along. The narratives that come in threads about this stuff here (I think Kate of Lokys' is probably the best, and I'm glad she shares it), show that something really catastrophic has to happen if the user is going to ever self-assess. If you can discuss things with him and keep them from getting to that point, you'll have done him a favor, though. A very possible scenario, more likely than the everquest guy who ran naked and delirious through the streets of Ohio(?) when EQ was big, is that it will just consume all of his free time and he'll learn to juggle his addiction while doing just enough academically and then professionally to keep his addiction going. I've definitely seen people at places like gamestop and best buy who operate like this. It's sort of like being a functioning alcoholic.

    I think it's more likely that he'll just ignore what you're saying, or act hostile and dismissive. This is something you should really talk to student psychological services about. If it's anything serious, he's likely to need pro. help in dealing with it. You can't fix him, most likely, but you should definitely try to intervene and get other people aware of his problem.




    TLDR; This behavior could well be the sign of crippling depression, anxiety or stress or lead to feelings of social isolation or helplessness (if schoolwork begins to suffer) that can cause depression and further isolation in a very vicious cycle. You should talk to him, and if that doesn't work consult your RA and campus health services.

    kaliyama on
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  • proXimityproXimity Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Bringing D&D up was a specific point, illustrating to how he committed to a group of people in person, then stood them up for a couple hours to play more WoW. That kind of thing sets off alarms to me.

    It's not that I have a blanket assumption that WoW is evil. I used to play it myself (though not nearly to this level, not by a long shot), and I know it can be quite fun. Honestly, I have no problems with the game other than how it sucks people in to point of them excluding almost everything else. I see no problem with it being played for a few hours a day, it is just a game.

    But he has been doing less and less of other activities, especially in the past couple months.

    proXimity on
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  • AwkAwk Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Mention something about women to him.

    Awk on
  • Seattle ThreadSeattle Thread Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    It's almost worse than kicking smoking
    Don't be dumb.

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  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited April 2009
    As someone said, if he's still doing decently in his classes, then he has his priorities as straight as he needs to have them, and it's relaly not your place to dictate what he does with his free time. As a D&D player *and* a WoW player I can tell you that the two really have an awful lot in common (especially with 4th ed, but that's a different argument altogether), except one is interacting and strategizing with people on your living room floor, and the other is interacting and strategizing with people far away, assuming he has a good guild, which it sounds like he does.

    It is like playing any other game all the damn time. It's not the most productive use of time, but not everybody wants to go out and socialize. And chances are good that if you let him he'll burn himself out of it (as most raiders eventually do) and put the game down to do other things.

    ceres on
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  • ScrubletScrublet Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I remember back right before college, when WOW came out around the time that original Counterstrike was at its height (CPL/CAL/OGL in full steam, etc.) One of my friends (who didn't make it to college until 4 or 5 years after me) sent me a message 3 or 4 months ago: "When I was playing CS, that was a big part of my life...when I was playing WOW, that WAS my life. 8 hours/day minimum, man." I'm sure that this next statement will bring a chorus of posters disagreeing with me and asserting that THEY aren't even WOW players, but it seems like everytime this type of thread pops up in H/A there's the round of people coming in saying, "wtf WOW's like any other activity you wouldn't have the problem if he was reading a book" or some other shit. I don't really see the comparison. There are plenty of people concerned about the amount of time spent on this game, even prior to its release (the ridiculous rest system was supposed to address this). I'm not aware of too many cases of book addiction.

    I think the posts about depression and such are overthinking it. While it's definitely possible, I've known plenty of normal, well-adjusted people that were otherwise fine with the exception of their massive involvement in this game.

    Scrublet on
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  • Locust76Locust76 Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    Friends don't let friends play wow =(


    Bullshit... true friends will switch factions!

    Locust76 on
  • SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Fuck Warren Ellis Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    What ended up getting me off the WoW train was sitting there one day with my friends while they talked about what an amazing time they had doing something (I can't even remember what it was now). I would say that a week later it began to become apparent that I was choosing a game over hanging out with actual people.

    I quit shortly after that.

    So go do fun stuff without him (but always invite him) and then actively talk about it around him.

    SatanIsMyMotor on
  • NargorothRiPNargorothRiP Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I personally find this entire discussion amusing. ten years ago it would of been people crying about everquest being "evercrack" and ruining families lives etc. The game is no more or less to blame then a crack pipe is for being used to fuel an addiction.

    However comparing it to painting or reading is about as dumb as you can get. Either of those are edifying experiences.

    Also how the hell do you find enough to do in wow to be on more then a couple hours a week? The game has the same content for 6 months, which is just rehashed easy garbage from 3 years previous.

    NargorothRiP on
  • RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Makershot wrote: »
    ApexMirage wrote: »
    It's almost worse than kicking smoking
    Don't be dumb.

    I used to smoke, and I used to also play World of Warcraft. I quit WoW a year ago, and to this day I still feel pangs and want to start up again. If that's not as bad as smoking, it's close. I mean, there's no other video game I've ever played that a year later I feel a pull to go back to.

    I think comparing WoW addiction to nicotine addiction is a fair one. Both are relatively harmless (in the short term, at least). WoW is designed from the ground up to be addicting on a neurological level. Everything about it is for a single purpose; to get you to keep paying your $15 a month.

    RUNN1NGMAN on
  • SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Fuck Warren Ellis Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    WoW is not designed to be neurologically addicting. Their are no neuro-scientists working for Blizzard.

    Nicotine is a chemical dependance. WoW is nothing more than a habit. Sure, it's tough to break but lets not kid ourselves here guys.

    SatanIsMyMotor on
  • RazielRaziel Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Seconded.

    I quit smoking and WoW at roughly the same time, for unrelated reasons. This was about mid-january. I had a geared up level 80 shaman and a level 80 warrior. So, significant time investment.

    And now, about four months in, here is the situation:

    My lungs still burn for the sweet taste of nicotine, and I couldn't give two shits about Ulduar.

    Really REALLY liking a video game isn't the same as having a chemical dependence. Are you nuts?

    Raziel on
    Read the mad blog-rantings of a manic hack writer here.

    Thank you, Rubacava!
This discussion has been closed.