As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/
Options

Long held misconceptions

CygnusZCygnusZ Registered User regular
edited April 2009 in Debate and/or Discourse
Back when I was in elementary school I loved reading fantasy books. It started in second grade when my father bought me The Book of Three. I enjoyed the sense of adventure, and all the strange creatures that the adventurers encountered on their journey. After reading the prydain books I moved on to Xanth, the Deathgate Cycle, until I finally stopped reading fantasy books when I entered high school.

Now, of all the odd creatures in all the fantasy books I ever read, the Unicorn never struck me as being particularly unrealistic. It's just a horse with a horn. To this day it seems possible to me that such a creature could really exist. I mean, pegasus and dragons are plain silly, but I could see unicorns herds running about in eastern Europe. A matter of fact, I thought that unicorns were real until our class took a trip to the bronx zoo in the last year of middle school. The biology teacher asked us what animals we would like to see in their habitats, and I bravely [foolishly] said that I would like to see a unicorn. The whole class burst out into laughter, and I was saved by the fact that everybody thought I was joking. That night when I told my parents, they were kind enough to inform me that unicorns are not real.

It's a bit of embarassing story, but I'm pretty sure I'm not alone here. I'd like to hear some of the misconceptions that many of the people here held onto that were dispelled way too late in life.

CygnusZ on
«13456724

Posts

  • Options
    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited April 2009
    CygnusZ wrote: »
    Back when I was in elementary school I loved reading fantasy books. It started in second grade when my father bought me The Book of Three. I enjoyed the sense of adventure, and all the strange creatures that the adventurers encountered on their journey. After reading the prydain books I moved on to Xanth, the Deathgate Cycle, until I finally stopped reading fantasy books when I entered high school.

    Now, of all the odd creatures in all the fantasy books I ever read, the Unicorn never struck me as being particularly unrealistic. It's just a horse with a horn. To this day it seems possible to me that such a creature could really exist. I mean, pegasus and dragons are plain silly, but I could see unicorns herds running about in eastern Europe. A matter of fact, I thought that unicorns were real until our class took a trip to the bronx zoo in the last year of middle school. The biology teacher asked us what animals we would like to see in their habitats, and I bravely [foolishly] said that I would like to see a unicorn. The whole class burst out into laughter, and I was saved by the fact that everybody thought I was joking. That night when I told my parents, they were kind enough to inform me that unicorns are not real.

    It's a bit of embarassing story, but I'm pretty sure I'm not alone here. I'd like to hear some of the misconceptions that many of the people here held onto that were dispelled way too late in life.

    Unicorns do exist. Behold, the unicorn!
    Ceratotherium_simum_kwh_2.jpg

    Premier kakos on
  • Options
    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    CygnusZ wrote: »
    Back when I was in elementary school I loved reading fantasy books. It started in second grade when my father bought me The Book of Three. I enjoyed the sense of adventure, and all the strange creatures that the adventurers encountered on their journey. After reading the prydain books I moved on to Xanth, the Deathgate Cycle, until I finally stopped reading fantasy books when I entered high school.

    Now, of all the odd creatures in all the fantasy books I ever read, the Unicorn never struck me as being particularly unrealistic. It's just a horse with a horn. To this day it seems possible to me that such a creature could really exist. I mean, pegasus and dragons are plain silly, but I could see unicorns herds running about in eastern Europe. A matter of fact, I thought that unicorns were real until our class took a trip to the bronx zoo in the last year of middle school. The biology teacher asked us what animals we would like to see in their habitats, and I bravely [foolishly] said that I would like to see a unicorn. The whole class burst out into laughter, and I was saved by the fact that everybody thought I was joking. That night when I told my parents, they were kind enough to inform me that unicorns are not real.

    It's a bit of embarassing story, but I'm pretty sure I'm not alone here. I'd like to hear some of the misconceptions that many of the people here held onto that were dispelled way too late in life.

    Unicorns do exist. Behold, the unicorn!
    Ceratotherium_simum_kwh_2.jpg

    hippopotamus

    hipos potamos

    river horse

    one horned river horse

    unicorn!!!!!!!!!

    Podly on
    follow my music twitter soundcloud tumblr
    9pr1GIh.jpg?1
  • Options
    KageraKagera Imitating the worst people. Since 2004Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    There are unicorns.

    But they are in the OCEAN!

    http://victorhh.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/narwhal-41.jpg

    Kagera on
    My neck, my back, my FUPA and my crack.
  • Options
    werehippywerehippy Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    For the longest time I didn't realize that gypsies were not only a distinct ethnic group, but still existed. For some reason I just never made the connection between gypsy and Roma. I think it finally came up in an argument about whether this incident was racist (a staffer somewhere or another used a word unfortunately similar to a word we don't use here in a speech about taxes and was run out of office) and people used gypped as a relevant example.

    edit: And I seemed to have missed the consensus to go the funny route. Well, more funny route.

    werehippy on
  • Options
    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    My friend once thought that spaghetti grew on trees, because he watched this show as a little kid that was joking about "the year's spaghetti tree harvest."

    Podly on
    follow my music twitter soundcloud tumblr
    9pr1GIh.jpg?1
  • Options
    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited April 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    CygnusZ wrote: »
    Back when I was in elementary school I loved reading fantasy books. It started in second grade when my father bought me The Book of Three. I enjoyed the sense of adventure, and all the strange creatures that the adventurers encountered on their journey. After reading the prydain books I moved on to Xanth, the Deathgate Cycle, until I finally stopped reading fantasy books when I entered high school.

    Now, of all the odd creatures in all the fantasy books I ever read, the Unicorn never struck me as being particularly unrealistic. It's just a horse with a horn. To this day it seems possible to me that such a creature could really exist. I mean, pegasus and dragons are plain silly, but I could see unicorns herds running about in eastern Europe. A matter of fact, I thought that unicorns were real until our class took a trip to the bronx zoo in the last year of middle school. The biology teacher asked us what animals we would like to see in their habitats, and I bravely [foolishly] said that I would like to see a unicorn. The whole class burst out into laughter, and I was saved by the fact that everybody thought I was joking. That night when I told my parents, they were kind enough to inform me that unicorns are not real.

    It's a bit of embarassing story, but I'm pretty sure I'm not alone here. I'd like to hear some of the misconceptions that many of the people here held onto that were dispelled way too late in life.

    Unicorns do exist. Behold, the unicorn!
    Ceratotherium_simum_kwh_2.jpg

    hippopotamus

    hipos potamos

    river horse

    one horned river horse

    unicorn!!!!!!!!!

    Poldy, dear, that's a rhinoceros, not a hippopotamus.

    But if you want an etymology, rhinoceros comes from the Greek word "ῤινόκερως", composed of "ῥινός", meaning nose, and "κέρας", meaning horn! Nose horn!

    Premier kakos on
  • Options
    Zilla360Zilla360 21st Century. |She/Her| Trans* Woman In Aviators Firing A Bazooka. ⚛️Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Unicorns don't exist, but at least there are Narwhals! :P

    Edit: Beated! :(

    Zilla360 on
  • Options
    CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    My friend once thought that spaghetti grew on trees, because he watched this show as a little kid that was joking about "the year's spaghetti tree harvest."

    That one was amazingly popular.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaghetti_tree
    The report was first produced as an April Fools' Day joke in 1957, reporting on the bumper spaghetti harvest in Switzerland, resulting from the mild winter and "virtual disappearance of the spaghetti weevil." Footage of the traditional "Harvest Festival" was aired as well as discussion of the breeding necessary for the development of a strain that produced the perfect length.

    The report was given additional plausibility by the voiceover by respected broadcaster Richard Dimbleby. Pasta was not an everyday food in 1950s Britain, and was known mainly from tinned spaghetti in tomato sauce. It was considered by many to be an exotic delicacy.[1] Parts of the documentary were filmed at the (now closed) Pasta Foods factory on London Road, St Albans in Hertfordshire, and other parts at a hotel in Castiglione, Switzerland.

    Panorama cameraman Charles de Jaeger dreamed up the report after remembering how teachers at his school in Austria used to tease his classmates for being so stupid that they would believe it if they were told spaghetti grew on trees.

    An estimated 8 million people watched the programme on April 1, and hundreds phoned in the following day to question the authenticity of the story, or ask for more information about spaghetti cultivation and how they could grow their own spaghetti trees. The BBC reportedly told them to "place a sprig of spaghetti in a tin of tomato sauce and hope for the best".[2]

    At the time of the broadcast there were 7 million homes in Britain with television sets, out of a total of 15.8 million homes.[3]

    The story has been labeled by CNN "undoubtedly the biggest hoax that any reputable news establishment ever pulled".[4]

    Couscous on
  • Options
    Loren MichaelLoren Michael Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I'm sorry, but that in no way bears any resemblance to the Platonic ideal of a horse. People used to be retarded, I guess.

    Loren Michael on
    a7iea7nzewtq.jpg
  • Options
    Cyd CycloneCyd Cyclone Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    My friend once thought that spaghetti grew on trees, because he watched this show as a little kid that was joking about "the year's spaghetti tree harvest."

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyUvNnmFtgI

    Greatest thing ever.

    Cyd Cyclone on
  • Options
    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited April 2009
    werehippy wrote: »
    For the longest time I didn't realize that gypsies were not only a distinct ethnic group, but still existed. For some reason I just never made the connection between gypsy and Roma. I think it finally came up in an argument about whether this incident was racist (a staffer somewhere or another used a word unfortunately similar to a word we don't use here in a speech about taxes and was run out of office) and people used gypped as a relevant example.

    edit: And I seemed to have missed the consensus to go the funny route. Well, more funny route.

    I was actually being serious. Unicorn myths probably originated from Europeans hearing about these one horned animals in Africa.

    Premier kakos on
  • Options
    saint2esaint2e Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    For the longest time I thought Leprosy was some "old" disease that was prevalent in Jesus' time (ie- him healing the lepers), but was dealt with, and wasn't a problem anymore.

    Sadly, it's still around.

    saint2e on
    banner_160x60_01.gif
  • Options
    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    absolutely amazing

    Podly on
    follow my music twitter soundcloud tumblr
    9pr1GIh.jpg?1
  • Options
    ElendilElendil Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    CygnusZ wrote: »
    Back when I was in elementary school I loved reading fantasy books. It started in second grade when my father bought me The Book of Three. I enjoyed the sense of adventure, and all the strange creatures that the adventurers encountered on their journey. After reading the prydain books I moved on to Xanth, the Deathgate Cycle, until I finally stopped reading fantasy books when I entered high school.

    Now, of all the odd creatures in all the fantasy books I ever read, the Unicorn never struck me as being particularly unrealistic. It's just a horse with a horn. To this day it seems possible to me that such a creature could really exist. I mean, pegasus and dragons are plain silly, but I could see unicorns herds running about in eastern Europe. A matter of fact, I thought that unicorns were real until our class took a trip to the bronx zoo in the last year of middle school. The biology teacher asked us what animals we would like to see in their habitats, and I bravely [foolishly] said that I would like to see a unicorn. The whole class burst out into laughter, and I was saved by the fact that everybody thought I was joking. That night when I told my parents, they were kind enough to inform me that unicorns are not real.

    It's a bit of embarassing story, but I'm pretty sure I'm not alone here. I'd like to hear some of the misconceptions that many of the people here held onto that were dispelled way too late in life.

    Unicorns do exist. Behold, the unicorn!
    Ceratotherium_simum_kwh_2.jpg
    Dude he has two horns

    Elendil on
  • Options
    KageraKagera Imitating the worst people. Since 2004Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I used to think Killer Bees would destroy us all.

    Kagera on
    My neck, my back, my FUPA and my crack.
  • Options
    PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Poldy, dear, that's a rhinoceros, not a hippopotamus.

    This is why I was held back in kindergarden. :(

    Podly on
    follow my music twitter soundcloud tumblr
    9pr1GIh.jpg?1
  • Options
    OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited April 2009
    I have a good one. For a long time (like, until I was 19 or 20) I didn't know where Korea was. I just sort of assumed it was down there in SE Asia with Vietnam and Cambodia and stuff.

    asia_bcopy.jpg

    The saddest part: I've been to South Korea!

    Organichu on
  • Options
    never dienever die Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    My friend once thought that spaghetti grew on trees, because he watched this show as a little kid that was joking about "the year's spaghetti tree harvest."

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyUvNnmFtgI

    Greatest thing ever.

    This is awesome!

    never die on
  • Options
    pinenut_canarypinenut_canary Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    This was an April Fool's from BBC a few years ago I think. I saw this for the first time last winter, and I didn't know it was an April Fool's joke. I was so happy when I was watching this. It was pure, untainted joy. I felt like I could accomplish anything in life thanks to them.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dfWzp7rYR4

    After watching it and read the comments, I realized it was an April Fool's joke, and I suddenly became really sad.

    pinenut_canary on
  • Options
    KageraKagera Imitating the worst people. Since 2004Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    It looked pretty fake to tell you the truth.

    Then again I already knew it was faked so maybe that affected my perception.

    Kagera on
    My neck, my back, my FUPA and my crack.
  • Options
    QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Remember that fake "When Cars Strike Next!" show Fox put out?

    Scared the shit out of me when I was a kid.

    Quid on
  • Options
    BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Quid wrote: »
    Remember that fake "When Cars Strike Next!" show Fox put out?

    Scared the shit out of me when I was a kid.

    No, but I do remember "When Cars Attack III" which was amazing!


    Edit: at least I thought there was a 3, but google isn't helping me find it.

    Burtletoy on
  • Options
    DukiDuki Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Organichu wrote: »
    I have a good one. For a long time (like, until I was 19 or 20) I didn't know where Korea was. I just sort of assumed it was down there in SE Asia with Vietnam and Cambodia and stuff.

    asia_bcopy.jpg

    The saddest part: I've been to South Korea!

    I think we made fun of you for this in some chat thread a long while back.

    Shit was funny.

    Duki on
  • Options
    Bionic MonkeyBionic Monkey Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited April 2009
    Kagera wrote: »
    I used to think Killer Bees would destroy us all.

    For the longest time as a kid, I was fucking terrified of the day killer bees would finally reach Oregon, and end life as I knew it. I'd have horrible thoughts about getting stung by a bee, already bad enough, and suddenly being swarmed by thousands of bees.

    Bionic Monkey on
    sig_megas_armed.jpg
  • Options
    OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited April 2009
    I guess I sort of had it coming.

    Organichu on
  • Options
    EvanderEvander Disappointed Father Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I go the opposite of the OP.

    Because of how they were often present in fantasy and ghost stories that I KNEW were fake, I was convinced as a child that pirates where completely fictional, and when my friend's parents told me that their coffee table was made out of a door off of an old pirate shit, I thought they were pulling my leg.

    Evander on
  • Options
    BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Evander wrote: »
    I go the opposite of the OP.

    Because of how they were often present in fantasy and ghost stories that I KNEW were fake, I was convinced as a child that pirates where completely fictional, and when my friend's parents told me that their coffee table was made out of a door off of an old pirate shit, I thought they were pulling my leg.

    Curious. Did you also assume knights in armor were not real in that case?

    Burtletoy on
  • Options
    CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Evander wrote: »
    I go the opposite of the OP.

    Because of how they were often present in fantasy and ghost stories that I KNEW were fake, I was convinced as a child that pirates where completely fictional, and when my friend's parents told me that their coffee table was made out of a door off of an old pirate shit, I thought they were pulling my leg.

    Well, a door made from old pirate shit would be odd.

    Your post reminds me of that Venture Bros. episode.

    Couscous on
  • Options
    EvanderEvander Disappointed Father Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Burtletoy wrote: »
    Evander wrote: »
    I go the opposite of the OP.

    Because of how they were often present in fantasy and ghost stories that I KNEW were fake, I was convinced as a child that pirates where completely fictional, and when my friend's parents told me that their coffee table was made out of a door off of an old pirate shit, I thought they were pulling my leg.

    Curious. Did you also assume knights in armor were not real in that case?

    I may have. The difference is that I heard far less stories about ghost-knights.



    I had a decent grasp on "what shit isn't real" as a kid, and since pirate lore is so closely associated with ghost ships and skeleton crews, it just got them lumped in.

    Evander on
  • Options
    pinenut_canarypinenut_canary Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I also believed everything in those tabloid magazines at the grocery store:

    "Bat-Kid Spotted!"
    "Half Crocodile, Half Man!"
    "Woman Gives Birth to Alien!"
    "Big Foot Found in Sewers of L.A.!"
    "Woman With Three Breasts!"

    pinenut_canary on
  • Options
    Casual EddyCasual Eddy The Astral PlaneRegistered User regular
    edited April 2009
    up until like a year or two ago I thought prog rock was 'prague rock'

    since prague is sort of a hip indie place in europe

    sigh

    Casual Eddy on
  • Options
    pinenut_canarypinenut_canary Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Haha. Awesome. Although I pronounce the "Prog" in "Prog Rock" as just prog.

    pinenut_canary on
  • Options
    CervetusCervetus Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Haha. Awesome. Although I pronounce the "Prog" in "Prog Rock" as just prog.

    That's how the city's pronounced by the literate. :)

    When I was a kid I heard somewhere that the world's ability to grow chocolate would be exhausted by 2000, and every year I would grow a little sadder by the impending death of my delicious sweets.

    Cervetus on
  • Options
    BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Cervetus wrote: »
    Haha. Awesome. Although I pronounce the "Prog" in "Prog Rock" as just prog.

    That's how the city's pronounced by the literate. :)

    When I was a kid I heard somewhere that the world's ability to grow chocolate would be exhausted by 2000, and every year I would grow a little sadder by the impending death of my delicious sweets.

    Instead you just get to be sad by losing bananas soon.



    Also, Fish, but I don't care so much about fish.

    Burtletoy on
  • Options
    archonwarparchonwarp Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    My older brother conned me into thinking that those huge tunnels through the mountains of Pennsylvania were vacuums and your lungs and eyes would pop out if you didn't hold your breath and shut your eyes. I was four so I believed him... :(

    archonwarp on
    873342-1.png
  • Options
    Look Out it's Sabs!Look Out it's Sabs! Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TijcoS8qHIE

    This is the first thing I thought of when I saw this thread.

    Look Out it's Sabs! on
    NNID: Sabuiy
    3DS: 2852-6809-9411
  • Options
    pinenut_canarypinenut_canary Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Burtletoy wrote: »
    Cervetus wrote: »
    Haha. Awesome. Although I pronounce the "Prog" in "Prog Rock" as just prog.

    That's how the city's pronounced by the literate. :)

    When I was a kid I heard somewhere that the world's ability to grow chocolate would be exhausted by 2000, and every year I would grow a little sadder by the impending death of my delicious sweets.

    Instead you just get to be sad by losing bananas soon.



    Also, Fish, but I don't care so much about fish.

    What? My bananas! Don't take away my bananas! Explain yourself!

    pinenut_canary on
  • Options
    CygnusZCygnusZ Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Evander wrote: »
    I go the opposite of the OP.

    Because of how they were often present in fantasy and ghost stories that I KNEW were fake, I was convinced as a child that pirates where completely fictional, and when my friend's parents told me that their coffee table was made out of a door off of an old pirate shit, I thought they were pulling my leg.

    Sid Meier's Pirates! went a long way to helping me understand the era of piracy. I have to admit though, I always wondered how the Spanish managed to make a silver train in the mid-1500s. Or, for that matter, why they kept on taking the train to Spain.

    CygnusZ on
  • Options
    BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Burtletoy wrote: »
    Cervetus wrote: »
    Haha. Awesome. Although I pronounce the "Prog" in "Prog Rock" as just prog.

    That's how the city's pronounced by the literate. :)

    When I was a kid I heard somewhere that the world's ability to grow chocolate would be exhausted by 2000, and every year I would grow a little sadder by the impending death of my delicious sweets.

    Instead you just get to be sad by losing bananas soon.



    Also, Fish, but I don't care so much about fish.

    What? My bananas! Don't take away my bananas! Explain yourself!

    Bananas are all cloned. They do not reproduce. They have no genetic variation. They are/will be decimated by diseases within our life time.
    While in no danger of outright extinction, the most common edible banana cultivar 'Cavendish' (extremely popular in Europe and the Americas) could become unviable for large-scale cultivation in the next 10–20 years

    Maybe I'm off by a little

    Burtletoy on
  • Options
    AsiinaAsiina ... WaterlooRegistered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Wait what, bananas can go extinct? That is the most tragic thing I've ever heard.

    As for things we should have learned a long time ago, I have no idea where peanuts come from. Maybe I'll look that up.

    EDIT: Ah, the underground part of a low plant.

    Asiina on
Sign In or Register to comment.