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Long held misconceptions

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    ResRes __BANNED USERS regular
    edited April 2009
    Res, I doubt you actually thought the gunpoint thing, because you basically just quoted a comedian's line verbatim.

    Really?

    Res on
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    geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    The toilet paper is just so you can see where the wet spots are.

    or you could wipe it off with toilet paper first . .

    geckahn on
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    Richard_DastardlyRichard_Dastardly Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    geckahn wrote: »
    The toilet paper is just so you can see where the wet spots are.

    or you could wipe it off with toilet paper first . .

    That just smears it around.

    Can't you catch genetal warts from a toilet seat? Or, am I just completely fucking retarded?

    Richard_Dastardly on
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    Caliban42Caliban42 Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    When I was a kid, I thought the Picture Picture thing on Mr Rogers was kind of like a VCR. Of course, when I was young enough to watch Mr Rogers, VCRs weren't really around, but the principle was the same. He put the movie reel in and the picture changed to the movie. I was in my 20s and flipping through the stations when I happened to catch Mr Rogers putting a movie in Picture Picture and then noticed for the first time that it wipes to the actual movie and had a brief, soul-crushing moment.

    Caliban42 on
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    DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited April 2009
    geckahn wrote: »
    The toilet paper is just so you can see where the wet spots are.

    or you could wipe it off with toilet paper first . .

    That just smears it around.

    Can't you catch genetal warts from a toilet seat? Or, am I just completely fucking retarded?

    that second one. "I must have caught it from a toilet seat" is something someone says when they don't want to say "I was fucking around on you."

    Doc on
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    Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against Russian warships) Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    It's not impossible, but the chances are about as good as in the H/A threads where the OP goes, 'I ejaculated within 3 meters of my girlfriend and now her period is two days late. Is she pregnant?'
    Caliban42 wrote: »
    I happened to catch Mr Rogers putting a movie in Picture Picture and then noticed for the first time that it wipes to the actual movie and had a brief, soul-crushing moment.

    You had that much emotional weight invested in Mr. Roger's VCR?
    CygnusZ wrote: »
    I'd like to hear some of the misconceptions that many of the people here held onto that were dispelled way too late in life.

    That I was a gifted and talented lover.

    It would've been nice if the revelation on that one had been handled a bit more gently.

    Gabriel_Pitt on
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    Caliban42Caliban42 Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    You had that much emotional weight invested in Mr. Roger's VCR?

    It was more of a "I can't believe I was that dense" sort of soul crushing. And it isn't a VCR. That's the whole point.

    Caliban42 on
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    DuffelDuffel jacobkosh Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    When I was really small I was very disappointed to learn that the earth was finite. Like, I thought off the borders of the map there were still pith-helmeted dudes with machetes hacking through brush and discovering whole big-ass continents. It saddened me to look at the globe and think "That's it?", and it still kind of does.

    Duffel on
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    QinguQingu Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I thought Sigmund Freud's last name was pronounced "Frood."

    I thought this throughout college, where I pronounced it like "Frood" in class. I knew that most people pronounced the name like "Froid," but if someone asked me about it I would say that it's like how people commonly mispronounce Descartes like "Des-kart-tees" instead of "Day-kart." And that Frood was the proper, but uncommon, pronunciation.

    Turns out the only reason I thought it was pronounced like Frood was because of Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure.

    Qingu on
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    BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    As soon as I read the first line of your post I was planning on saying that I always thought it was Beeth-oven and So-crates.

    Bama on
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    ResRes __BANNED USERS regular
    edited April 2009
    Qingu wrote: »
    I thought Sigmund Freud's last name was pronounced "Frood."

    I thought this throughout college, where I pronounced it like "Frood" in class. I knew that most people pronounced the name like "Froid," but if someone asked me about it I would say that it's like how people commonly mispronounce Descartes like "Des-kart-tees" instead of "Day-kart." And that Frood was the proper, but uncommon, pronunciation.

    Turns out the only reason I thought it was pronounced like Frood was because of Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure.

    What happened? Did you eventually provide this explanation to a German speaker?

    Res on
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    GungHoGungHo Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    TeeMan wrote: »
    Hell, even I have no idea what Australian culture, or what our national identity, is. Not anything that isn't shared by a myriad of other nations, at least.
    To this day, almost my entire perception of Australia is based off of Crocodile Dundee.
    It's closer to Road Warrior. If you see guys on motorcycles driving past you, the other way, dragging something behind them, DON'T STOP AND LOOK.
    LineNoiz wrote: »
    When I was five, I heard someone say "he picked himself up" in reference to something or other. I heard that, thought it was a great idea, tried it, and broke my tailbone. Stupid gravity.
    The pro-wrestler, Gorgeous George, would boast that he was so strong he could lift his own weight. George was a small man for wrestling, so Lou Thesz challenged him on his assertion. George stood on a two-by-four and attempted to pick himself up.

    So, my personal misconception story:

    I thought water towers contained apple juice. In fact, I called them "Apple Juice Towers." I didn't know they were water towers, but figured out they contained liquid. I figured... why would you need to store water there? It's everywhere. So, I knew it needed to be some sort of useful liquid. Oil drums, I'd seen. Milk would spoil. Kool Aid is made with water. So, being a small child and liking apple juice, apple juice was the obvious choice.

    GungHo on
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    Richard_DastardlyRichard_Dastardly Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Duffel wrote: »
    It saddened me to look at the globe and think "That's it?", and it still kind of does.
    I've always felt like I was born in the wrong century.

    As a kid, I thought sex made sparks... sorta like a sparkler, only not painful. And then I found my dad's copy of Behind the Green Door one day when the parents were out. That... uh... dispelled quite a few myths for me.

    Oh yeah, and before I went to my first permanent duty station, I thought the US military was full of competent, hard working people who loved our country. Heh...

    Richard_Dastardly on
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    CycloneRangerCycloneRanger Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Duffel wrote: »
    When I was really small I was very disappointed to learn that the earth was finite. Like, I thought off the borders of the map there were still pith-helmeted dudes with machetes hacking through brush and discovering whole big-ass continents. It saddened me to look at the globe and think "That's it?", and it still kind of does.
    There are plenty of new continents to discover. They're just on other planets nowadays. You can buy maps of Mars or Earth's moon, and we've got radar maps of a few other worlds as well. The majority of our solar system is uncharted at that detail level, and of course the vast, vast majority of the galaxy is a complete unknown.
    Qingu wrote:
    I thought Sigmund Freud's last name was pronounced "Frood."

    I thought this throughout college, where I pronounced it like "Frood" in class. I knew that most people pronounced the name like "Froid," but if someone asked me about it I would say that it's like how people commonly mispronounce Descartes like "Des-kart-tees" instead of "Day-kart." And that Frood was the proper, but uncommon, pronunciation.

    Turns out the only reason I thought it was pronounced like Frood was because of Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure.
    I have mispronounced a great many things in my day. I used to pronounce "dissect" as "die-sekt" instead of the correct "dis-sekt". It's weird that so many people make this mistake, because "die-sekt" doesn't even make any etymological sense.

    CycloneRanger on
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    DuffelDuffel jacobkosh Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    There was also the time - I was probably about six or so - my dad was varnishing the deck and I guess he didn't want me to touch it, so he told me that, "If you touch that stuff it'll rot your hand off."

    I was scared shitless of going around that deck for years. The thompson's water seal can was a source of unending horror for me.

    Duffel on
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    MaceraMacera UGH GODDAMMIT STOP ENJOYING THINGSRegistered User regular
    edited April 2009
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    Macera on
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    LeitnerLeitner Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I was convinced that Nagasaki was bombed before Hiroshima, and that it was deeply ironic that Hiroshima was the one everyone remembered. I even brought this up in an English seminar and persuaded everyone there along with the lecture this was the case. Whoops.
    This happened last month.

    Leitner on
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    QinguQingu Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Res wrote: »
    Qingu wrote: »
    I thought Sigmund Freud's last name was pronounced "Frood."

    I thought this throughout college, where I pronounced it like "Frood" in class. I knew that most people pronounced the name like "Froid," but if someone asked me about it I would say that it's like how people commonly mispronounce Descartes like "Des-kart-tees" instead of "Day-kart." And that Frood was the proper, but uncommon, pronunciation.

    Turns out the only reason I thought it was pronounced like Frood was because of Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure.

    What happened? Did you eventually provide this explanation to a German speaker?
    No, my friends had an intervention.

    Qingu on
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    KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    GungHo wrote: »
    I thought water towers contained apple juice. In fact, I called them "Apple Juice Towers." I didn't know they were water towers, but figured out they contained liquid. I figured... why would you need to store water there? It's everywhere. So, I knew it needed to be some sort of useful liquid. Oil drums, I'd seen. Milk would spoil. Kool Aid is made with water. So, being a small child and liking apple juice, apple juice was the obvious choice.

    I had a somewhat similar belief - I noticed that when I peed, sometimes it was yellow and sometimes it was clear. Since I generally only drank either milk or orange juice, I figured that yellow pee was from orange juice and clear pee was from milk.

    KalTorak on
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    PantsBPantsB Fake Thomas Jefferson Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    It's not impossible, but the chances are about as good as in the H/A threads where the OP goes, 'I ejaculated within 3 meters of my girlfriend and now her period is two days late. Is she pregnant?'

    Those are not good times my friend. "No sure, babe, of course I'm a little worried its just that..."

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    KillgrimageKillgrimage Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    When I was a kid my dad liked to fuck with me a lot for whatever reason so I had some pretty strange "misconceptions" while I was growing up. One memorable one was that every once in a while a train would pass in front of our car at a railroad stop and my dad would tell me to wave. He told me that if I didn't wave a the conductor every time I saw a train pass by, he wouldn't try to stop if I was ever on the tracks. In fact, he would actively try to run me over.

    I stayed the hell away from railroads as a child so at least that did me some good safety wise.

    e: spelling

    Killgrimage on
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    THEPAIN73THEPAIN73 Shiny. Real shiny.Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    KalTorak wrote: »
    GungHo wrote: »
    I thought water towers contained apple juice. In fact, I called them "Apple Juice Towers." I didn't know they were water towers, but figured out they contained liquid. I figured... why would you need to store water there? It's everywhere. So, I knew it needed to be some sort of useful liquid. Oil drums, I'd seen. Milk would spoil. Kool Aid is made with water. So, being a small child and liking apple juice, apple juice was the obvious choice.

    I had a somewhat similar belief - I noticed that when I peed, sometimes it was yellow and sometimes it was clear. Since I generally only drank either milk or orange juice, I figured that yellow pee was from orange juice and clear pee was from milk.


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    PasserbyePasserbye I am much older than you. in Beach CityRegistered User regular
    edited April 2009
    GungHo wrote: »
    I thought water towers contained apple juice. In fact, I called them "Apple Juice Towers." I didn't know they were water towers, but figured out they contained liquid. I figured... why would you need to store water there? It's everywhere. So, I knew it needed to be some sort of useful liquid. Oil drums, I'd seen. Milk would spoil. Kool Aid is made with water. So, being a small child and liking apple juice, apple juice was the obvious choice.

    Man, that's just cute.

    I wish I could remember the misconceptions I had as a child, but I'm not sure I had any. I was always close to my dad, so I'd ask him about everything. Being a science-nerd, he'd explain everything realistically.

    I suppose this did give me the long-standing misconception that grown ups are all smart and wise.

    Passerbye on
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    OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited April 2009
    Oh, on a not-so-adorable note: growing up I really thought that Arabs were pretty much Djinn. This belief persisted until my emigration.

    Organichu on
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    JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Place at the tableRegistered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I grew up on a ranch, I was pretty precocious, and I had only my parents, other ranchers, and migrant workers for company.

    So I grew up swearing and reading at an early age.

    I did have a few thread-relevant beliefs.

    My mom is a wonderful cook. Like, makes bread and cakes from scratch, always has some kind of home-made soup going, makes her own home-made noodles for pasta dishes, etc. My parents are radical, off the grid, right-wingish people. One thing my dad would always bitch and rant about en re hating cities was "hippy assholes and their goddamn health food"

    Now, since fast food was only found in cities, I assumed it was the "health food" in question until I was about 6. Even after disabusing myself of that notion, I still viewed fast food as AWESOME TREATS you got to have when you WENT TO TOWN and delicious goddamn who the fuck is rachel ray anyway home-made food as boooooring.

    Another belief came from my dad, and this one persisted for quite a while. My dad is really my step-dad, in a technical sense. He's about 5'6"

    I'm about 6'5" and I got really tall, really fast. Like I hit 5' tall the summer between kindergarten and first grade. (you know on how I met your mother? When Jason Segal visits lilly's classroom and has to sit in the tiny chair? That was my life in gradeschool)

    My dad also, today, weighs about 200 pounds. I know what you're thinking. You're thinking, "Wow, Johnny's dad is a fat little dude"

    Yeah. actually, he's got about 20 pounds of non-muscle on his body, and I'm giving him credit for a large brain. He was a DI for about 10 years. He's a retired CW4. He has maybe a 34" inch waist and is one of those horrible natural mesomorphs you hear about. He's 74, with a fused back, and he can cheerfully do things like spend an 8 hour day chopping wood or branding cattle, then eat a big steak, smoke an unfiltered home-rolled smoke, go to bed a 10 pm, get up at 7am, have his pancakes and bacon and do it all again, at an age when most people are geriatric.

    The bacon grease, you understand, being what keeps the pancakes from sticking to the griddle on the civil war era wood stove that is the central cooking and heating appliance in his home, the home he built, from foundation to roof, out of trees he chopped down and dressed, then furnished with furniture he made, plumbed with water that comes from a well he dug in a location he surveyed, a location near his home site - which is at 7500', sits about an hour from a public road, and requires snowmobiles to access in the winter and ATVs or horses for much of the spring. Sometimes, though, he heats up leftovers using electricity that comes from the solar panels and wind turbines he rigged up to the house he wired for electricity. I'm saying, basically, that this dude abides.

    Now. At 74 years of age.

    20 years ago, when I was ten, he weighed about 180 and his forearms were about the size of Xmas hams.

    OK. You get it. My dad's a fictional character from a Heinlein novel What's my point?

    My point is that, I'm a head taller then this guy, and he can pull the handle off a monkey wrench, whereas I, as a 13 year old, can "Only" pick up and carry, you know, like, 125% of my body weight. I'm looking at junior high, where I am clearly expected to play football since I am like, the size of most of my assumptive team-mates fathers.

    But I am firmly convinced that I have some sort of disability and am clearly a frail, weak, faggoty milksop of a person, and that clearly my fragile bones and bloated, yet puny, muscles will be insufficient defense on "the gridiron" (Which I thought, until I was 14, was the metal grid-shaped thing you do mobility drills through in football practice)

    OK, so I have a friend. He's the only black kid in our class, one of two (the other being his massively popular, 5 or 6 years older brother) in our school district. This, conjoined with racism on the part of our classmates and his brother being the standout varsity player on our HS team at the time, placed him in a similar status of obligatory participation, but he was actually determined to follow in his brother's sports footsteps and is massively psyched for us to start playing football, and he's determined to break me of my mopey, shoegazing depression EN RE my impending doom (Not playing, mind you, was not an option - it would have been akin to getting a tshirt that said "I AM A FAGGOT PUNCH ME AND GET FIVE DOLLARS" on it, and wearing it until graduation) so he takes me to the HS weight room, which we are too young to be allowed to use, determined to show me, empirically, using science and metal things and books and stuff, that I was wrong.

    We lift some weights. It's going OK. I seem to be lifting about as much as him, but I suspect he was coddling me. So I go to check out the lifting being performed by the other two people in the gym (the closed highschool gym you would have to be a dedicated varsity athlete to have summer keys for)

    One of them was the aforementioned older brother. He went on to play big league college football...as the second shortest fullback in the pac 10.

    The other was a rather typical looking high-school girl. Whom I would later learn, and who still, I believe, holds the female records for shot-put, bench, and squat in our athletic conference.

    Both of them barely came to my shoulders, and both of them were lifting more then most adult men.

    I walked out of the weight room, knowing, certain, that I was going to die in a week when football practice started. I shuffled home, with a broken, busted attitude and stance, gazing to and fro for a shelter I did not then know existed - for the first time in my young life, my Irish Despair Genes had activated, and though I could not articulate it, even to myself, I was feeling a new-born and powerful need to sit on a stool and be near, perhaps even achieve some sort of internal communion with, fermented liquids.

    If I would have known about scotch on that day, I'd still be drunk.

    epilogue: Of course the day of practice came and went, and I discovered two things - first, I hate running and have no stride (still true) and second, I was big enough to simply put out my hands and forestall the person in front of me completely (still true as long as it's a 13 year old) and this meant with no knowledge of the game of football whatsoever, 20/80 eyesight, and a crushing determination to find hilarious new and gawky ways to fail athletically, I was still starting material.

    and so I was spared.

    Oh, two more quick ones: I pronounced Europe phonetically as AEe-ur-roe -p until I was about 12. Fortunately, I never once in that time period said the word out loud, it was only to myself while reading.

    And finally, until about age 10 I believed "the great depression" was a time of deep national sadness.

    JohnnyCache on
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    darthmixdarthmix Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I remember when I was starting kindergarten one of the first-graders in our K-1 class explained to everyone at our lunch table that, if you ever failed to finish your lunch, the school's policy was to take you into the cafeteria kitchen, stuff your lunch down your throat, and then kill you. For a while I wondered if this could actually be true.

    The worst part is that my parents played it totally straight when I told them about it. They were all "Yeah, that does sound a bit harsh, don't you think, dear?" etc.

    darthmix on
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    cooljammer00cooljammer00 Hey Small Christmas-Man!Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Guys, not only is there crazy amounts of space and the black to discover, but think about all the cool shit underwater that for some reason we ignore. We pour lots of money into space exploration but barely anything into underwater exploration.

    Or so I heard from that dude on Colbert.

    edit: I kind of wish I had some misconceptions to add. Maybe the narwhal thing applies to me, too.

    This isn't a misconception, but I always wanted to live in a house with secret compartments and tunnels. Still do.

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    darthmixdarthmix Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Okay, one that's actually embarassing: for the longest time I had it in my head that New York City was to the north of Boston. I have no idea why I thought that, except that I've lived in California my whole life. I didn't learn the truth until I actually visited both cities in my late teens. And somehow, in the subconscious part of my brain that stores my mental map of the United States, I still think New York is north of Boston.

    darthmix on
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    AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    edited April 2009
    darthmix wrote: »
    Okay, one that's actually embarassing: for the longest time I had it in my head that New York City was to the north of Boston. I have no idea why I thought that, except that I've lived in California my whole life. I didn't learn the truth until I actually visited both cities in my late teens. And somehow, in the subconscious part of my brain that stores my mental map of the United States, I still think New York is north of Boston.

    ...checks map. DAMMIT!

    I've been to New York. That's kinda surreal.

    Aioua on
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    jothkijothki Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Guys, not only is there crazy amounts of space and the black to discover, but think about all the cool shit underwater that for some reason we ignore. We pour lots of money into space exploration but barely anything into underwater exploration.

    Or so I heard from that dude on Colbert.

    I like to think that it's because the people deciding the funding have their own forum threads about interesting animals, and decided they'd rather take a chance with the aliens.

    jothki on
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    cooljammer00cooljammer00 Hey Small Christmas-Man!Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    But think of all the leviathans and three-headed sea monsters on old cartography maps that haven't been discovered yet.

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    FallingmanFallingman Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    My fiancé had her tonsils out when she was really young. At the time, she didn't understand what a hospital really was. To her, it was where ladies went when they were "being given" a baby. So she thought she was going in to get a baby of her own.

    Man, she was so pissed when she woke up that she told her mum that not only did she not get a baby, but they did something to her throat. Her mum then told her that's not where babies come from. They come from Debenhams.

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    EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Not about me, but a coworker, and really sad because he was over 30 and not a loser. For some reason we were talking about porcupines and he said they were mean; I said that they're pretty cute, because you see them up in the trees in Minnesota all the time. And they mostly just sleep all the time and I think are pretty non-aggressive.

    And he said "But what about when they shoot their quills?" I didn't feel bad about setting him straight. It actually completely changed my opinion of the guy.

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    PonyPony Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    until i was like 14 i assumed ninjas were entirely fictitious

    that at no point was there ever, historically, people to whom the fictional ninjas of movies and video games were based upon

    my dad had and continues to have a giant boner for japanese cinema and so i was raised with samurai movies and the like

    and sometimes ninjas would come up

    but they would always be ridiculous mystical warriors and bullshit

    so i just assumed they were part of japan's mythical history

    it wasn't until i was a teenager and i got into an argument with a dude about Ninpo and "real" Ninjitsu that i did a little research on the subject and learned that while most of the portrayals of ninjas in fiction are entirely bullshit, there was nonetheless real people at one time on who the stories and stuff are based upon

    that was pretty weird

    Pony on
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    CervetusCervetus Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    For many years I thought sexism and racism were archaic and no longer practiced except by the occasional loon on Jerry Springer or so.

    Cervetus on
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    SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Cervetus wrote: »
    For many years I thought sexism and racism were archaic and no longer practiced except by the occasional loon on Jerry Springer or so.

    Oh man, the first time I heard an old white guy make a blatantly racist remark on the bus, I started looking around for for the cameras. I had no idea that people like that were a part of random society, I figured they all had their own commune or something.

    Sarcastro on
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    pinenut_canarypinenut_canary Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    GungHo wrote: »

    So, my personal misconception story:

    I thought water towers contained apple juice. In fact, I called them "Apple Juice Towers." I didn't know they were water towers, but figured out they contained liquid. I figured... why would you need to store water there? It's everywhere. So, I knew it needed to be some sort of useful liquid. Oil drums, I'd seen. Milk would spoil. Kool Aid is made with water. So, being a small child and liking apple juice, apple juice was the obvious choice.

    Holy crap. We are the same person. In WA state towards the South (Yakima, Tri-Cities area), there are a lot of apple orchards. One particular apple orchard got its water source from a water tower in an adjacent field. Because the company was the owner of the water tower, there was a giant apple painted onto it. And that was my reasoning.

    Those apples must be picked and then turned into apple juice, which is then stored in the apple juice tower.

    pinenut_canary on
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    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited April 2009
    darthmix wrote: »
    Okay, one that's actually embarassing: for the longest time I had it in my head that New York City was to the north of Boston. I have no idea why I thought that, except that I've lived in California my whole life. I didn't learn the truth until I actually visited both cities in my late teens. And somehow, in the subconscious part of my brain that stores my mental map of the United States, I still think New York is north of Boston.

    ...

    Okay, so I read this post of yours and my first thought was "New York City is north of Boston." And then I went to Google maps and was like "Well, fuck me sideways."

    My knowledge of east coast geography is sorely lacking. It probably stems from our horrible school systems and my father's irrational fear/avoidance of the east coast.

    On the other hand, I know all the countries in Asia and South America and where they are located. I also know where all the former Soviet Bloc countries are. This is due to the fact that my entire High School history curriculum was about South America and Russia.

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    OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Cervetus wrote: »
    For many years I thought sexism and racism were archaic and no longer practiced except by the occasional loon on Jerry Springer or so.
    I was 6 before I realized that the black family that went to our church looked different than anyone else in town.

    I was 14 when I figured out that the town 20 miles up the road that my dad didn't really like going to was home to the largest active Klan population in the state.

    OptimusZed on
    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
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    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited April 2009
    Pony wrote: »
    until i was like 14 i assumed ninjas were entirely fictitious

    that at no point was there ever, historically, people to whom the fictional ninjas of movies and video games were based upon

    my dad had and continues to have a giant boner for japanese cinema and so i was raised with samurai movies and the like

    and sometimes ninjas would come up

    but they would always be ridiculous mystical warriors and bullshit

    so i just assumed they were part of japan's mythical history

    it wasn't until i was a teenager and i got into an argument with a dude about Ninpo and "real" Ninjitsu that i did a little research on the subject and learned that while most of the portrayals of ninjas in fiction are entirely bullshit, there was nonetheless real people at one time on who the stories and stuff are based upon

    that was pretty weird

    Ummm, ninjas are entirely fictitious. Just because ninjas are gross exaggerations of dispossessed peasants turned bandits does not mean that ninjas are real. For example, Dracula is a gross exaggeration of a real life figure Vlad Tepes, but I don't think anyone here argue that vampires are real at all.

    Premier kakos on
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