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These things are why NASA needs more money

QuestionMarkManQuestionMarkMan Registered User regular
edited May 2009 in Social Entropy++
Alright, first we have Dark Flow.

Alexander Kashlinsky discovered in an incredibly controversial paper published in October 2008 that the multitude of galaxies that populate the known Universe are swirling inexplicably toward a tiny 20-degree plane of deep space. To put it simply, the paper suggests that way WAY out in the cosmos lay a chunk of matter so beyond our understanding that it is actually pulling the observable universe toward it at 600km/s.

The key point here is "observable universe." We can't (and never will) "see" what this mass of theorized matter looks like. Telescopes cannot see events earlier than about 380,000 years after the Big Bang, when the universe became transparent; this corresponds to the particle horizon at a distance of about 46 billion (4.6×1010) light years. Since the matter causing the net motion is outside this range, it would in a certain sense be outside our visible universe; however, it would still be in our past light cone.

Which is too bad, because the dark flow theory hints that this mass, or super structure, could be anything from another universe to a realm of whimsical fancy whose physics, forces and warped space-time are completely beyond any of us. They could have superheroes over there and we would never see it! Alex and other scientists are still studying this over at WMAP.


Next up, the WOW! Signal.

wowcl.jpg

Dr. Jerry R. Ehman on August 15, 1977, while working on a SETI project at the Big Ear radio telescope of Ohio State University, intercepted a 72-second narrowband radio signal. Because the unknown signal fit the parameters of what an artificial space signal might sound like so exactly, the awestruck Ehman jotted down "Wow!" when he first heard it.

One of the biggest pieces of evidence supporting WOW! is its length, as Ehman writes in a big-ass research paper:
There is still another factor to consider. The signal could actually have been present for years (or millennia, for that matter) prior to its detection for the following reason. Just before the data acquisition and analysis (i.e., the "run") began, the declination of the telescope was changed. In the days (and years) previous to August 15, 1977 the radio telescope was not pointed at the declination where Wow! was seen; thus, we couldn't have detected that signal. I should note that during the Ohio Sky Survey many years earlier, we did survey the same declination we did when the Wow! signal was discovered. However, we were using a wideband receiver (8 MHz bandwidth). A narrowband signal averaged over a wide bandwidth would be reduced in intensity so much that it would have been buried in the noise. Thus, even if Wow! were present then, we wouldn't have seen it.

Attempts to find the signal again in the following 20+ years have failed, but scientists have admitted that it's not implausible for it to be extraterrestrial in nature, possibly a last-ditch transmission by a dying alien race. You can also find a big summary of the thing here.


Next up, the universe SCREAMS (radio signals)!

299788main_Balloon_art_hi.jpg

In a story that broke earlier this year, NASA's ARCADE received deafening cosmic radio background. In the words of Alan Kogut from the Goddard Space Center, "The universe really threw us a curve. Instead of the faint signal we hoped to find, here was this booming 'noise' six times louder than anyone had predicted."

Normally radio telescopes pick up electromagnetic chatter in the 10 MHz and 100 GHz, coming from what are known as "radio galaxies." But according to our existing models and theories, the signal shouldn't exist, as there are "not enough radio galaxies to account for the signal." NASA also said that to create this signal, "you'd have to pack [radio galaxies] into the universe like sardines. There wouldn't be any space left between one galaxy and the next."

This thing also complicates matters in that it makes detecting Dark Flow even more difficult.


Finally, the Hubble spies UFO.

What-Was-It.jpg

Alright, so on February 21, 2006, the Hubble telescope spied a UFO in an area of space where there should have been nothing at all. In the paper that was published last year, NASA concludes with
NASA wrote:
We suggest that the transient may be one of a new class.

What.

After a hundred days of observation, it disappeared from the sky with no explanation. It got very bright over time, to the 21st magnitude, then faded just as fast. Kind of like an explosion. Surely it must have been a supernova, right?
NASA wrote:
The shape of the light curve is inconsistent with microlensing. In addition to being inconsistent with all known supernova types, is not matched to any spectrum in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database.

OH FUCK.

This thing appeared out of nowhere. It just wasn't there before. In fact, NASA doesn't even know where it is exactly located because it didn't behave like anything they know. Apparently, it can't be closer than 130 light-years but it can be as far as 11 billion light-years away. It's not in any known galaxy either. It's something that they have never encountered before. The only thing the astronomers—working on the Supernova Cosmology Project—can tell is that it appeared all of the sudden in the direction of a cluster with the catchy name of CL 1432.5+3332.8, about 8.2 billion light-years away.

Props to Gizmodo for their article which I supplanted with stuff from wiki.

QuestionMarkMan on
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    Grey GhostGrey Ghost Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    QMark I have so many boners for you right now

    that UFO thing is insane and so is Dark Flow

    is Dark Flow a separate phenomenon from the Great Attractor? because that was what I thought of when I started reading that

    Grey Ghost on
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    QuestionMarkManQuestionMarkMan Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    8-)

    QuestionMarkMan on
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    The Otaku SuppositoryThe Otaku Suppository Bawstan New EnglandRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Oh sure. It could lead to a universe full of superheros.

    Or it could lead to a universe STRAIGHT FROM HELL

    We can't take that chance.

    The Otaku Suppository on
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    augustaugust where you come from is gone Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I thank you for this OP.

    august on
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    DrIanMalcolmDrIanMalcolm Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I think it's different than the Great Attractor

    DrIanMalcolm on
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    LockoutLockout I am still searching Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    shit like this is awesome

    i love outer space

    Lockout on
    f24GSaF.jpg
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    Grey GhostGrey Ghost Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I think it's different than the Great Attractor

    Yeah, further research leads me to believe this

    great, now there's TWO of these motherfuckers out there

    Grey Ghost on
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    #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I maintain that the best thing bush did as president was give NASA a direction and a deadline

    #pipe on
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    Tweaked_Bat_Tweaked_Bat_ Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I came.

    Tweaked_Bat_ on
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    laughingfuzzballlaughingfuzzball Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    There was this guy, came up to me completely out of the blue while I was walking downtown. He talked to me for about twenty minutes. He started talking about astronomy, then how great he was at science in school, then ghosts, then aliens, then Druids, then ducks. At one point he asked me if I knew where Chicago was.

    At first I just thought he was a little off, but it quickly became obvious that he was ten kinds of retarded and twelve kinds of unsocial. It was entertaining, once I figured out that as far as he was concerned, my participation was unnecessary and unwelcome.

    laughingfuzzball on
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    UbikUbik oh pete, that's later. maybe we'll be dead by then Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    All those things were done on a sound stage in the Nevada desert

    Ubik on
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    WrenWren ninja_bird Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    how many breasts do these alien females have?

    Wren on
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    FishmanFishman Put your goddamned hand in the goddamned Box of Pain. Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    Fishman on
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    That's unbelievably cool. Your new name is cool guy. Let's have sex.
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    Handsome CostanzaHandsome Costanza Ask me about 8bitdo RIP Iwata-sanRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    fucking rad

    Handsome Costanza on
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    UbikUbik oh pete, that's later. maybe we'll be dead by then Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    Immortality unfeasible? Let me introduce you to my friend


    His name is Jesus Our Lord Savior

    Ubik on
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    QuestionMarkManQuestionMarkMan Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.
    man don't depress me

    QuestionMarkMan on
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    SquallSquall hap cloud Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Wasn't this on Giz earlier today?

    Squall on
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    LockoutLockout I am still searching Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    The second one wouldn't really bother me a whole lot, because man if I lived that long, I would think it's an acceptable end point.

    Lockout on
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    QuestionMarkManQuestionMarkMan Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Squall wrote: »
    Wasn't this on Giz earlier today?
    Yes, I mention it in the OP

    QuestionMarkMan on
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    SquallSquall hap cloud Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Squall wrote: »
    Wasn't this on Giz earlier today?
    Yes, I mention it in the OP

    I should really stop skim reading OPs

    EDIT: On topic,

    I hadn't heard much about any of it other than the WOW signal, which was of considerable interest to me when it was mentioned in the astro courses I took in high school

    Squall on
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    SquallSquall hap cloud Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    also thanks for adding additional information on the large 'nova'

    The Giz article didn't mention NASA dispelling the idea that it was a nova, as that was the first thing that came to mind for me

    Squall on
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    seizureorbsseizureorbs Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    this is a wonderful wonderful thread

    I would want to be an astronaut or a deep sea diver if both didn't scare me as much as they fascinated me

    seizureorbs on
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    augustaugust where you come from is gone Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I think by the time you as a being would be concerned with the heat-death of the universe, you'd be pretty ready to transcend spacetime.

    Or will have always been ready.

    Or whatever.

    august on
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    Tweaked_Bat_Tweaked_Bat_ Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Lockout wrote: »
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    The second one wouldn't really bother me a whole lot, because man if I lived that long, I would think it's an acceptable end point.

    Being around for the end of the Universe would be pretty interesting.

    Tweaked_Bat_ on
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    AMP'dAMP'd Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Lockout wrote: »
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    The second one wouldn't really bother me a whole lot, because man if I lived that long, I would think it's an acceptable end point.

    Being around for the end of the Universe would be pretty interesting.

    UNIVAC, can entropy be decreased?

    E: I like this TOTP

    AMP'd on
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    DrIanMalcolmDrIanMalcolm Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    oh shit
    Wikipedia wrote:
    Jellyfish usually die after propagating; however, the Turritopsis nutricula has developed the ability to return to a polyp state. This is done through a cell change in the external screen (exumbrella). The cells revert to a different state. The medusa is transformed into a stolon and the polyps into a hydroid colony. The umbrella turns inside out; middle section and tentacles are resorbed before the polyp spawns. Stolons form two days before the polyps differentiate. The ability to reverse the life cycle is probably unique in the animal kingdom, and allows the jellyfish to bypass death, rendering the Turritopsis nutricula biologically immortal. Lab tests showed that 100% of specimens reverted to the polyp stage.

    DrIanMalcolm on
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    SquallSquall hap cloud Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Lockout wrote: »
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    The second one wouldn't really bother me a whole lot, because man if I lived that long, I would think it's an acceptable end point.

    Being around for the end of the Universe would be pretty interesting.
    9781405090841.jpg

    Squall on
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    George Fornby GrillGeorge Fornby Grill ...Like Clockwork Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Thread needs more Cthulhu Theories.

    George Fornby Grill on
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    Tweaked_Bat_Tweaked_Bat_ Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    oh shit
    Wikipedia wrote:
    Jellyfish usually die after propagating; however, the Turritopsis nutricula has developed the ability to return to a polyp state. This is done through a cell change in the external screen (exumbrella). The cells revert to a different state. The medusa is transformed into a stolon and the polyps into a hydroid colony. The umbrella turns inside out; middle section and tentacles are resorbed before the polyp spawns. Stolons form two days before the polyps differentiate. The ability to reverse the life cycle is probably unique in the animal kingdom, and allows the jellyfish to bypass death, rendering the Turritopsis nutricula biologically immortal. Lab tests showed that 100% of specimens reverted to the polyp stage.

    Wow.

    Tweaked_Bat_ on
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    Handsome CostanzaHandsome Costanza Ask me about 8bitdo RIP Iwata-sanRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    its cthulhu

    Handsome Costanza on
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    HarrierHarrier The Star Spangled Man Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    oh shit
    Wikipedia wrote:
    Jellyfish usually die after propagating; however, the Turritopsis nutricula has developed the ability to return to a polyp state. This is done through a cell change in the external screen (exumbrella). The cells revert to a different state. The medusa is transformed into a stolon and the polyps into a hydroid colony. The umbrella turns inside out; middle section and tentacles are resorbed before the polyp spawns. Stolons form two days before the polyps differentiate. The ability to reverse the life cycle is probably unique in the animal kingdom, and allows the jellyfish to bypass death, rendering the Turritopsis nutricula biologically immortal. Lab tests showed that 100% of specimens reverted to the polyp stage.
    holy SHIT

    Harrier on
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    DrIanMalcolmDrIanMalcolm Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I found that when I was looking at articles on manowars

    DrIanMalcolm on
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    mastmanmastman Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I like black holes and stuff like this.

    "Inside a black hole, the very fabric of the universe is collapsed into a point of infinite curvature -- known as a "space-time singularity," where the laws of physics no longer apply."

    mastman on
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    Grey GhostGrey Ghost Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I've known about the eternal jellyfish for a while and they still make me sit back and take a breath every time I read about them again

    Grey Ghost on
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    MugginsMuggins Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    So can we go to NASA with a check and go, "Hey here take this. All I ask for in return is awesome space shit."

    Muggins on
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    The_ScarabThe_Scarab Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Grey Ghost wrote: »
    I've known about the eternal jellyfish for a while and they still make me sit back and take a breath every time I read about them again

    Don't sit back, man. These things must be stopped at all cost. I propose a summit, a meeting of the world's greatest minds. Professor Stephen Hawking. Bill Nye. Doc brown. That smart yet annoyingly attractive guy who works at CERN who is on TV all the damn time.

    This brain trust will formulate five plans to deal with the encroaching jelly threat. Gentlemen, there has never been a greater need for collective thought, and strength of arms. Together, and only together, will we make it through - as a species we must prevail!

    The_Scarab on
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    FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Lockout wrote: »
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    The second one wouldn't really bother me a whole lot, because man if I lived that long, I would think it's an acceptable end point.

    Being around for the end of the Universe would be pretty interesting.

    Sure, but what about after it's over? Would be boring as fuck.

    Food on
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    mastmanmastman Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Food wrote: »
    Lockout wrote: »
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    The second one wouldn't really bother me a whole lot, because man if I lived that long, I would think it's an acceptable end point.

    Being around for the end of the Universe would be pretty interesting.

    Sure, but what about after it's over? Would be boring as fuck.

    we are not likely to survive the end of the universe given current technological/psychological means. Temperature either plummets to near absolute zero as the universe spreads out too much or the whole universe compresses back into a single mass in one entertainingly fiery event.

    so says the two most popular theories

    mastman on
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    Tweaked_Bat_Tweaked_Bat_ Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Food wrote: »
    Lockout wrote: »
    Fishman wrote: »
    There are times I get depressed because immortality is unfeasible owing to the tendency of systems to move towards entropy and the eventual heat death of the universe.

    The second one wouldn't really bother me a whole lot, because man if I lived that long, I would think it's an acceptable end point.

    Being around for the end of the Universe would be pretty interesting.

    Sure, but what about after it's over? Would be boring as fuck.

    We re-create the Universe in our own self-image.

    Tweaked_Bat_ on
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    QuestionMarkManQuestionMarkMan Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    this is a wonderful wonderful thread

    I would want to be an astronaut or a deep sea diver if both didn't scare me as much as they fascinated me
    What's cool about deep sea diving is that, apart from the many MANY ways you can die from it, there's also the still-not-explained affliction that can happen to divers where they suddenly go unconcscious and suffocate.

    This happens in, the great book, Shadow Divers

    QuestionMarkMan on
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