food dump

FoodFood Registered User regular
edited May 2010 in Artist's Corner
I'm a random dude who just finished a year of drawing classes and is about to post a big ass dump of random shit I drew.

I didn't date my stuff and it's all mixed together (not to mention I completely lost an entire folder of drawings) but I'll try to arrange this as best as I can. I have a lot of stuff, so bear with me.

First off we got some blind (well, semi blind) contour drawings. These are generally arranged from oldest to newest, so hopefully you can see some progress. I really love doing these but I'm not sure there's much to say about them.

These first few are drawn from TV.

blindcontour7-1.jpg

tvcontour1-1.jpg

blindcontour6-1.jpg

blindcontour5-1.jpg

tvcontour6-1.jpg

tvcontour5-1.jpg

tvcontour2-1.jpg

tvcontour3-1.jpg

tvcontour4-1.jpg

Then a few from around the classroom:

blindcontour3-1.jpg

blindcontour2-1.jpg

blindcontour1-1.jpg

and one from inside my garage:

blindcontour4-1.jpg


Now some random still-lives. Again, I tried to arrange them oldest to newest.

plant-1.jpg
Charcoal drawing of a plant! Exciting!

stilllife2-1-1.jpg
An apple inside some crazy sort of alchemical instrument. I forget what it's called.

stilllife-1.jpg
A still life with a plaster face thingy.

stilllife1-2.jpg
random objects with classmates in the background

stilllife2-3.jpg
fruit on a stool with a paper bag, using vine charcoal

stilllife4-1.jpg
some random stuff in charcoal

stilllife3-2.jpg
pencil drawing of same set up

stilllife1-1-1.jpg
vaguely impressionistic

stilllife2-2-1.jpg
slightly more stylized

stilllife3-1-1.jpg
my newest still life, from about a month ago. sorry about the terrible photography and the scratches.


Now, a few self portraits. These were all done around the same time, so they're in no particular order.

selfportrait2-1.jpg
5 minute gesture drawing done with marker

selfportrait3-1.jpg
attack of the killer hand! done with marker and conte crayon.

selfportrait4-1.jpg
I look like I'm wearing make up.

selfportrait7-1.jpg
yeah!


And finally, here are some gesture drawings done over the course of the year, arranged from oldest to newest.

lion1-1.jpg
stuffed lion on bucket

sadcat2-1.jpg

sadcat1-1.jpg
sad kitty

apple2-1.jpg
pretty sweet apple!

Naked Ladies!:

figure1-1.jpg

figure4-1.jpg

super fast 2 minute gesture drawings with charcoal:

gesturecharcoal1-1.jpg

gesturecharcoal2-1.jpg

gesturecharcoal3-1.jpg

gesturecharcoal4-1.jpg

gesturecharcoal5-1.jpg

and a teacup:

teacup-1.jpg


Whew! That is a lot of bad drawings! And sorry for the terrible photography, any advice on that would be welcome.

This was my first year of any form of art instruction. I realize there's not much to say about this stuff besides 'draw more' but I would appreciate any general criticism you can give. I go to community college right now and am hoping to transfer to a 4 year art school, so I'd also like to know what I should do over the summer to keep improving as I have a long way to go.

My most recent (and best!) drawings are still at school being graded, but I will post them next week. I'll probably also throw up some random sketch book stuff in the meantime. That's enough for now, though.

Food on
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Posts

  • bombardierbombardier Moderator mod
    edited May 2009
    Stuff like the blind contours are really just exercises. There's nothing to say about them. For your life work, I see a lot of outlining and not enough defining of the form. Outlining is fine for building up your structure, but don't rely on it for finishing a piece. Observe the value of the planes and use that to define your shapes and imply your outlines.

    bombardier on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    You're definitely right about the outlines. I've been trying to drop those for a while, but it's difficult. How do you feel about the teacup, for instance? Am I heading in the right direction?

    Food on
  • winter_combat_knightwinter_combat_knight Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    bombardier wrote: »
    For your life work, I see a lot of outlining and not enough defining of the form. Outlining is fine for building up your structure, but don't rely on it for finishing a piece. Observe the value of the planes and use that to define your shapes and imply your outlines.

    Definately work on that in your drawings at this early stage in your learning. Otherwise you'll become like me and use the same bad habbits over and over.

    I think you've got a good understanding of the shapes you are drawing. I really like this one. Your charcole ones are very nice.

    winter_combat_knight on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Thanks for the tips.

    I found some pastels in my closet today and decided to try them out.

    clouds.jpg

    I was just trying to get the feel for them. I've never really worked with color before, so this was interesting. It's much more vibrant in real life.

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Well I just got back my last few drawings from school. That means it's time for more POORLY PHOTOGRAPHED AMATEURISH DRAWINGS! WOO HOO!

    surrueureueal.jpg

    This was a surrealist project where we were given three random objects to be incorporated into a drawing somehow. I got a stuffed panda, a bronze apple, and a baseball card.


    bridgephoto.jpg

    This was drawn from a photo using that grid technique (as you can see from the poorly erased grid lines :P).


    bridgephotozoomin.jpg

    We then had to zoom into a single square on the grid and draw it with two complementary colors of our choice. I decided to blend them and try to get a dirty, polluted look. It looks better in real life, I swear!


    For our final project we had to make three sequential drawings. We were given an order, and had to take an element from the person in front of and behind us into our first and last drawings. The idea was that when arranged in order, the classes drawings would create some sort of narrative. The clock and the face were the elements I used from other drawings.

    cityface1.jpg

    cityface2.jpg

    cityface3.jpg



    There you go. I'd love critiques on composition in particular. It's something I didn't really ever think about until these last few surrealist assignments, and getting a balanced picture is a process that both confuses and intrigues me.

    Food on
  • winter_combat_knightwinter_combat_knight Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    the last lot are very creative. nice

    winter_combat_knight on
  • misosoupmisosoup Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    just because I'm a pedant, those gesture drawings really aren't gesture drawings, just quick sketches. I heartily reccommend you do some gesture drawings.
    Food wrote: »
    cityface1.jpg

    this one is genuinely charming, the muted colours work very nicely, although the other two, whilst great ideas, have no sense of depth or perspective, the clock tower type affair in the foreground of number three looks like a stencil, and all the strange building type shapes in number two are all just clustered together with no real consideration or planning.

    misosoup on
    APTBSsig.jpg
  • WillethWilleth Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    The contour work could be really interesting with a little more thought about composition and line width variation.

    Willeth on
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  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    misosoup wrote: »
    the other two, whilst great ideas, have no sense of depth or perspective, the clock tower type affair in the foreground of number three looks like a stencil, and all the strange building type shapes in number two are all just clustered together with no real consideration or planning.

    I really struggled with adding depth in the third one. I just didn't have enough time to go into as much detail as I would have liked, so I used the clouds and the ink as a kind of cop out.

    In the second one I was trying to go for a chaotic look, especially in that group of buildings. But if it doesn't work it doesn't work. For depth, do you think it would help if I darkened the background a bit?
    Willeth wrote: »
    The contour work could be really interesting with a little more thought about composition and line width variation.

    You're right. I'm going to try that.

    Food on
  • The_Glad_HatterThe_Glad_Hatter Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    on your earlier model drawings: try to avoid the rough background you hastily coloured around your figures. It's a trick i used to resort to too when i started out, until one of my teachers pointed out it's an unnessesary way to fake depth in your actual drawing. Since you're drawing, you'll want all of de depth to be present in the figures themselves, without having to resort to "tricks".
    and if you insist on doing a bg, try doing one les distractive.. (the one surrounding the guy holding the fish is incredibly sloppy and really distracting. Try to keep 'em either in tune with the drawing (using the same visual language/ technique) or do 'em in a different technique, but without drawing attention.

    The_Glad_Hatter on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    point taken

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Man... I'm suffering from artist's ADD these days. I've been drawing a lot, but I can't seem to focus on a single thing for more than a half hour when it's not a class assignment. Anyway, I want to keep this thread up to date, so here are some sketchbook things. Feel free to give advice and/or insult my skills.

    blankethead.jpg

    bullandhand.jpg

    bust.jpg

    cherub.jpg

    cloudman.jpg

    faces.jpg

    foot.jpg

    footscape.jpg

    handdrawinghand.jpg

    hand-based.jpg

    howtokillamarker.jpg

    willendorf.jpg

    misc.jpg

    questionmark.jpg

    randompage.jpg

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Well today I finally forced myself to just buckle down and work on an image for about an hour and a half. It's a little wonky in a few spots, but I still feel like it's a big step up for me. Crit the fuck out of me.

    olddude.jpg

    Food on
  • GrennGrenn Registered User
    edited June 2009
    I actually like your wiggly blind drawings the most, they remind me of Jon Burgerman.

    Your more traditional stuff shows promise, keep working at it!

    Grenn on
  • wallcrallrwallcrallr Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Your work show's definite promise and progress throughout. You made a comment about artist ADD. Days like this (and any other day really) I would recommend one of two short drawing/sketch exercises I've picked up from both my old college classes and Glenn Fabry: Muscles in Motion.

    Method 1:
    1) set up a scene, find a model or sit down at like a bar or coffee shop... hell, even just sit in front of a mirror.
    2) start out with basic structure sketches (advanced stick figures or "gesture drawings") to give yourself the basic form of your scene's motion... make yourself to multple sketches... never spending more than 1 min on each one.
    3) Move up to 2-3 min drawings. Start adding basic body structure, or body outlines without any detail.
    4) Move to 5-8 min drawings. Start adding detail. Make sure that you're using the steps progressively. In your 5 min drawings you should spend the first 1 min with gesture, next 1-2 mins with structure, next 3+ mins with detail.
    5) Finally, take like a 20 min break... then sit down and do one 30 min drawing.

    This technique helps you get a quicker idea on the motion and form of a body. When I started doing this it turned drawings I was doing in 3 hours that were decent into drawings I was doing in 1, maybe 1.5 hours, that were good and much more accurate.

    Method 2: This is Glenn Fabry's advice in his book.
    1) Go buy(or rent) a martial arts, work-out or dance video.
    2) Play the video if you find a pose you like... or even one you don't... freeze frame
    3) spend anywhere from 30 seconds to 4-5 mins drawing that pose.
    4) Draw as fast as you can and as accurately as you can
    5) Once the time is up, play the video for another minute or so, then repeat
    6) Fill sketch books.

    This technique does virtually the same thing as the first one. It just teaches you to get quicker. You can apply this same technique to drawing in public. Sit on a bench and draw people as they pause where ever they are going. Though you may not care about how fast you can draw a picture, if you can learn to draw a basic gesture, body structure and detail in about 10 mins, you have the next 1.5 hours to spend really working the drawing. Making touch ups and what not.

    wallcrallr on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    That is some really helpful stuff. Thanks, man.

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Uh I know this is a lame thing to do, but I'm guessing threads get deleted after page 2 so bump.

    I've been lazy about scanning things recently, but I was planning to make post this weekend.

    Food on
  • NibCromNibCrom Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    They don't get deleted. They just don't show up in the default search. If it gets lost, just extend the date on the bottom. :)

    NibCrom on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    WELL. I've been pretty lazy about putting stuff up here, but I'm still drawing. Lately I've been cracking down and forcing myself to sit down and do boring traditional drawings for hours at a time. There are figure drawing sessions at a place near me, and those have helped. I've also been trying to figure out color with some nice pastels that I bought. Just give me comments on anything, but I'd especially love tips on how to work with color as I've never had any classes on that.

    IMG_1719.jpg

    IMG_1721.jpg

    IMG_1731.jpg

    IMG_1723.jpg

    IMG_1726.jpg

    IMG_1727.jpg

    IMG_1728.jpg

    IMG_1725.jpg

    IMG_1729.jpg

    IMG_1732.jpg

    IMG_1730.jpg

    Food on
  • MustangMustang Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    I think you're showing some really good progress here Food, maybe just pay a little more attention to your construction. Apart from that I'd just say that whatever it is your doing is working, so keep doing it.

    Mustang on
  • Radar6590Radar6590 Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    While you do seem to be showing some improvement, there are a few key areas that you can really work on.

    Proportions: Definitely watch your proportions. While I understand those models were of larger women, some of their head to body ratios look crazy. So crazy that they must be at least 9 or 10 feet tall. And when that isn't an issue, you seem to be just over-enlarging upper torsos to the point of being top-heavy. And then, in the last model piece, her neck looks pretty thin, and again, her torso is an example of what I'm talking about. And, comparatively, her arm looks wicked thin. This sounds kind of extreme, I know. It's not like you're crazy-off, here, it's just subtle things that will make each piece look way better when corrected.

    Anatomy: I'm hesitant to say anything, because you are improving here a ton. I guess, just keep studying the muscles and bodies of the models in front of you, see what's really there. And know that each part or muscle is connected to another. Nothing is independent of the other parts. Not entirely. And, as a case in point, (sorry to pick on this one so much. It's easiest because it is the most refined)the last model piece, again, shows this through the angle of her shoulders, and her breasts. Her left (our right)breast is lower than her right, when it should be higher, because that shoulder is held higher.

    Foreshortening: The best examples of this are in your feet. Closer things are going to appear larger. Three model pieces down, the large woman facing us, her legs are either probably coming towards us or are hanging loose towards the ground. But her feet appear to get much smaller (proportionally, I understand her feet are smaller than her body, but it's all relative),giving the viewer the sense that they are receding in space. And, again, the piece right below that, the foot held under the leg appears too small to be there, when it should be closer to us than the foot on the floor.

    Values: You seem to have a basic grasp of values in black and white. Just remember to translate it to your colored pieces. Values being, of course, how dark or light a part of the piece is. Sometimes in using cool colors for shading, you are simply using a cyan-type blue without darkening it. This is usually done with some type of neutral. Dark brown most commonly in pastel. This both desaturates the shadow and darkens it, giving it a more three dimensional appearance.

    Color: You seem to be well on your way. What am I doing?

    Refining: I'm not sure how much time you spent on these, or how much you might have been allowed, but you have a very, very rough "quick" sense about your art. Like you kind of know what to put down but you may be unwilling or afraid to actually put it there, concretely. Second last model piece, I much prefer your linework to the side of the full drawing. Much more refined, with different line weights. More interesting than even your whole sketch of the woman. Not sure which you did first, but aim more towards the lines to the side. With the color stuff, it's just a matter of really taking the time to blend the colors and cover the page.

    Composition: Your compositions aren't bad, just remember to consider how much negative space is in the image versus positive space. All of your still lives have a ton of space. If you made the still lives yourself, you might want to consider building them up with more objects. Or, if not, zooming in on certain parts and learning how to balance the piece without a wide angle composition. And know that color affects composition as well. Both in terms of high saturation popping objects, and how complimentary colors are brought out vividly by being close (red and green, blue and orange, yellow and violet) I do enjoy the comp of the last piece, and it's triadic scheme. You may want to tone the red down, though, or the blue, to make it look a little less like an LSD trip. The "missing" color will be noted just because of the scheme, even without being so bright and vivid.

    Radar6590 on
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  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Thanks, I appreciate the feedback. There's so much to consider when drawing a figure in terms of anatomy, proportion, weight, value, etc. that even though I understand it all on a technical level I'm not at a point yet where I can bring it all together in a drawing. I feel like I'm getting closer with every drawing I do, though. Those line drawings that you mentioned on the side of the second-to-last figure were done by a really nice lady next to me in the figure drawing session who happened to be an art teacher and was giving me pointers. The one in the far upper right is mine, however. I understand what you're saying about needing to refine my drawings more. It's always a struggle to make myself spend time on a single drawing. It's part of the reason that I've been forcing myself to do these studies, because otherwise I will fill up sketchbooks with random quick 5 minute drawings that don't really do much to increase my skill.

    As for the pastels, I still don't really know what I'm doing with them, but you make a really good point about my still-lifes being poorly set up. I'll fix that in the next one I do.

    Food on
  • winter_combat_knightwinter_combat_knight Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    It's all great progress. But i had to point out that this made me laugh. That model is freaky.
    IMG_1725.jpg

    winter_combat_knight on
  • ManonvonSuperockManonvonSuperock Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    willendorf.jpgIMG_1727.jpg

    I too once had a life drawing model that looked like the Venus of Willendorf.

    ManonvonSuperock on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    IMG_1733.jpg

    One last quick drawing from the sessions that I was going to. Unfortunately that was the last one of the summer.

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Here's something I made today and yesterday.

    http://x3non.com/image/ANON/178/scape%20001.jpg

    Linked because the picture is enormous for some reason.

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited September 2009
    I felt like doing something different the other day.

    facethingy.jpg

    Different? Maybe. Good? I don't know, but it felt good to do something I hadn't tried before.

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited September 2009
    I'm taking a two dimensional design class.

    IMG_0197.jpg
    boom

    IMG_0198.jpg
    boom

    IMG_0196.jpg
    boom

    Also I haven't been keeping up with my life drawing as much as I should, but I did go to this one figure session a week ago. It was weird cause the model only went as long as 15 min per pose but I need to work on quick drawings anyway.

    IMG_0203.jpg

    IMG_0199.jpg

    IMG_0201.jpg

    IMG_0202.jpg

    IMG_0204.jpg

    IMG_0205.jpg

    IMG_0206.jpg

    IMG_0207.jpg

    IMG_0208.jpg

    IMG_0209.jpg

    that last one got pretty smudged, sorry bout that.

    Food on
  • RankenphileRankenphile Passersby were amazed by the unusually large amounts of blood.Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited September 2009
    I'd suggest slowing down a little with your linework, make them a little more deliberate. You've got some good stuff, but it feels a bit rushed and not as careful as it could be.

    Rankenphile on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited September 2009
    Yeah, good call. If I make it to the one of these tomorrow I'll slow it up for sure.

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Here's this:
    IMG_0212.jpg

    IMG_0214.jpg

    IMG_0215.jpg

    IMG_0216.jpg

    IMG_0218.jpg

    IMG_0219.jpg

    IMG_0220.jpg

    IMG_0224.jpg

    IMG_0225.jpg

    edit: Oh yeah, and I just finished this for my 2d design class. Still not sure which way should be up.
    IMG_0227.jpg

    Food on
  • deadlydoritodeadlydorito __BANNED USERS
    edited October 2009
    willendorf.jpgIMG_1727.jpg

    I too once had a life drawing model that looked like the Venus of Willendorf.

    i lol'd

    deadlydorito on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    It's true, the resemblance was uncanny.

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    da da da da da da da da da da

    IMG_1761.jpg

    IMG_1759.jpg

    Food on
  • MustangMustang Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    I bid 8 hojillion dollars!

    Mustang on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Ha ha ha... But I think they're worth a little more than that. we'll speak again when youre serious about buying some art.

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Ok, so here's a self portrait I just did that will be part of a sculpture that I will probably post a photo of soon:

    selfpforsculpt.jpg

    That right eye is pretty messed up, it was supposed to be squinty because my hand was pulling the skin around it but it just looks weird. Any tips on that would be welcome.

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    I'm working on this collage now, but I'm not sure the little narrative in it is clear enough that people will understand it.

    IMG_1835.jpg
    The dude is pulling that weird ball thing to plug it into the ethernet jack with the birds coming out of it. That thing on the bottom right is an ethernet cable.

    So could you tell what it was before you read the spoiler?

    edit: I guess I'm also not really happy with the composition. Do you think I'd lose anything by dropping the ethernet thing entirely and just focusing on what the guy's pulling behind him?

    Food on
  • FoodFood Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Pfft I didn't want your help anyway.

    IMG_1836.jpg

    Food on
  • ManonvonSuperockManonvonSuperock Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    is all of this work for a high school art class?

    ManonvonSuperock on
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