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What's a realistic time for losing weight?

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    nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    people get awful caught up on total body weight. If you're overweight losing fat to start is great. however once you're at a decent overall weight building muscle mass is important too. You'll actually look much better if you drop 10 pounds of fat and replace it with 10 pound of muscle than if you just dropped 20 pounds altogether.

    nexuscrawler on
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    HeirHeir Ausitn, TXRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    people get awful caught up on total body weight. If you're overweight losing fat to start is great. however once you're at a decent overall weight building muscle mass is important too. You'll actually look much better if you drop 10 pounds of fat and replace it with 10 pound of muscle than if you just dropped 20 pounds altogether.

    QFT.

    As someone else mentioned, www.fitday.com is a great way to track all your nutrition, activities, calories burned, weight, etc. You can also put in goals and set up a journal.

    This is a good site to determine the amount of calories you need to maintain your weight.

    http://www.healthrecipes.com/calories.htm

    The Harris-Benedict formula is pretty good if you don't know your actual bodyfat percentage. I think the numbers tend to be a little high though.

    As others have said, a good regimine of cardio and weight lifting is a great start.

    For cardio, I still get shin splints, leg pain as my entire family is notorious for crappy legs. :) I tend to alternate days between running, swimming, and biking (plus I'm training for a triathlon, so that kind of makes sense for me).

    But as many others have said, your ultimate priority is to have a calorie deficit.

    If the equation x activity multiplier gives you something like 3000 calories, try taking in 2000 instead. For example.

    Good luck to you. Find a partner if you can, it makes it much easier to stick with it.

    Heir on
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    The FritzThe Fritz Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    If you can find a buddy who enjoys it:

    Chasing plastic (Ultimate Frisbee, or just tossing a disc) is an awesome way to run around for an hour or four. Its a combination of sprinting and jogging, and can be done with one other person.

    The great thing is, the worse you are, the more you run. It takes about 2-3 months to really get decent, then you and your buddy can start taking up tricking, Ultimate, or just lengthening the distance between ya.

    I found it addictive due to the amount of skill required to throw a disc correctly, and all the tricky aspects of it. The running just came naturally.

    Don't be afraid to find a regular Ultimate group as well. They are some of the more welcoming people out there... probably cause they are hippies.

    The Fritz on
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    ReitenReiten Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    First, consult with your doctor. This is very important.

    Cardiovascular workouts don't really happen until you hit a heart rate of about 120 or so, but this will vary w/ body size/type. Many of the stationary bikes today have heart rate monitors.

    There was a study published earlier this year that found a very fast way to raise metabolism (important for attaining and maintaining weight loss) was through interval training on a stationary bike (like a spinning class). IIRC, the researchers were shocked at how fast the metabolism of the test subjects went up.

    If you don't like running, there are always elliptical machines or some stationary bikes have arm stuff also for an extra workout.

    Whatever you do, don't just start jogging. Your joints won't take it. You need to build up to jogging through walking increasing distances and speeds for a couple weeks. Sudden exercise or weight training is the way a lot of people get hurt because while their muscles might respond fairly quickly, their bones, joints, ligaments and tendons aren't strong enough. Not to mention that unless you like feeling awful, you'll start to associate exercise with negative feelings. That's a great way to make sure you don't last beyond a week or two.

    Reiten on
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    BlackDog85BlackDog85 Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    I topped out around 235 during the first semester of my junior year at college; today, at the end of first semester of my senior year, I'm down to about 205, and it's a very noticable difference.

    Really, setting a timetable isn't a good idea; you need to just get into a healthy routine, and go at the pace that's best for you. For me, I, like many others, dropped my first 15 pounds pretty quickly; it then levelled out for a bit, until I really started to kick into gear again near the end of this past summer.

    For exercise, time spent exercising does matter. Generally speaking, 30 minutes of cardio a day helps you to maintain your current weight, while 60-90 minutes helps in weight loss. Naturally, it all depends on your caloric intake and how much you burn each day, but, again, I'm speaking in general.

    While short bursts of more intense work DO have an effect, extended cardio is better for your heart, which will in turn help your endurance and all-around health, and also aid in speeding up your metabolism, or so I've found.

    And with food, make small changes at first: replace as many bread products as you can with whole grains and wheat, use peanut butter for a small dessert instead of, say, cookies, drink diet instead of regular soda (DOES help), etc. etc. You won't need to eliminate snacking completely, and I still have some bad eating habits (I probably could've lost more weight this year if I didn't), but they won't totally hinder you if you're consistent with your exercising and other dietary changes.

    EDIT: I should add, I'm 21, and already have awful knees (thanks, genetics!), so doing a lot of running is basically out of the question for me. Ergo, at the gym, I hit up elliptical machines, and something new I've found to be very effective, arc trainers. Also, swimming is very good. None of them hurt my knees, and all work multiple muscle groups, as well.

    BlackDog85 on
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    KreutzKreutz Blackwater Park, IARegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    I lost 50 pounds last year, biking 5 miles a day five days a week. Only thing is, I injured my manparts a bit because I rode in jeans instead of bike shorts. Don't do that.

    Kreutz on
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    stixs4321stixs4321 Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Heir wrote:
    For cardio, I still get shin splints, leg pain as my entire family is notorious for crappy legs. :) I tend to alternate days between running, swimming, and biking (plus I'm training for a triathlon, so that kind of makes sense for me).
    Look into building or purchasing a DARD. Apparently you can build one with just screwing together pipes from home depot. You use it to workout your shins as to avoid injury. Also look into getting some deep massages or ART done on them to break up any scar tissue.

    You may also wanna consider working on your postirier chain(lower back, glutes, hamstrings) in general. Better lower body posture could relieve some of the stress on the shins and help the knees in the long run.

    www.t-nation.com Look into articles like "Get your butt in gear" and "Neanderthal no more". They'll help you get some knowledge and exericses to help lower body posture.

    http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=680677 - Building your own DARD, just right click view picture to see it larger.

    stixs4321 on
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    DalbozDalboz Resident Puppy Eater Right behind you...Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    I just lost 33 lbs. in about 2.5 months (started intensely the last week of September, although I really started at the beginning of September, in which case I lost 42 lbs.). I'll tell you that the key to weight loss can be summed up in a single word: HABIT! You need to break your old habits and replace them with healthier habits, both eating and activity-wise. And that's why it's so hard for most people. Breaking habits are probably some of the hardest things we need to do sometimes, because they get so ingrained in us that when we don't follow them, our day feels incomplete. You need to reprogram yourself to get the best results. After a while, they can become second nature. The first two to three weeks will be the hardest, but it will start to get a little easier after that.

    The habits I got into:
    1. Read nutrition labels. Count not just the calories you consume, but the fat and sodium as well. Use this to manage how much you consume each day. Also read the ingredients label. Avoid as many additives as possible, especially hydrogenated and partially-hydrogenated oils and high-fructose corn syrup.

    2. Eat more fruits and vegetables. I try to buy organic when I can. When they say five serving of fruits and vegetables per day, it's actually not that hard. Remember, a carrot is a serving, so chopping a carrot and piece of celery and putting it on some lettuce gives you three servings. Quick and easy, right? Add a little tuna and you have a healthy lunch!

    3. Change how you eat. I got into the habit of eating 200 calories every three hours. I would usually have a pack of raisins handy if the time came and I could grab a healthier alternative. This is probably a little harder as you need to time yourself and be strict about it. It will help keep your metabolism up and consistent. You also need to remember to stop eating after you have consumed enough, even if you are still feeling hungry. Put down the fork! Don't worry, it will pass.

    4. Get some physical activity. This is important to losing weight. Diet alone doesn't work as well. Exercise alone doesn't work as well either. You need to combine the two in order to consume enough to maintain proper nutrition but still burn enough calories to lose weight. You goal should be to create a calorie deficit of 500 calories per day, but don't worry if you don't do that, and don't hurt yourself getting there. I would do cardio and weights when I could, but I would also try to walk everywhere I went. This may not feasible for some depending on where the live and need to go, but even getting out and walking will help.I would run on some days. I also went to a sporting goods store and bought some wrist weights (only a pound), and would where them while shadow boxing for 45-50 minutes. Trust me, it's a really good cardio workout. You'll be pouring sweat by the end of it. Again, make it a habit!

    5. Drink plenty of water. You don't want be holding onto too much sodium and it will need to be flushed out. This will probably result in rather dramatic weight loss in the beginning, as you will start losing a lot of water if you were eating a lot of sodium. Also, remember that you are try to lose mass, and the Laws of the universe, matter can neither be created nor destroyed. So if you are losing mass, it has to go somewhere. Drink plenty of water to help your body flush it out. Again, another habit to get into.

    6. Cook as much food as you can rather than buying premade packaged foods. Inconvenient, yes, at times it can be. So what I would do is usually do a lot of cook on the weekend and store the food in tuperware in the fridge, then reheat it throughout the week. Avoid making fatty or salty foods. I made a lot of black beans and lentils on brown rice. But here's something a lot of people don't think of: use spices liberally. It doesn't have to be tasteless. You spice the food however you want. I liked putting cayenne pepper on my bean. I would cook lentils with a couple of bay leaves in the pot and add turmeric, ginger, cumin, and garlic to make curry. Experiment and have fun with it.

    If you've noticed, basically a lot what I did is take all the healthy stuff you've probably heard before and just did it. No fad diets, no cleansers, nothing. Just simple stuff that needed to be made into habits. The hard part is making it a part of a normal life, and as evident by me, the weight came off pretty quickly. I can't guarantee that it will work for everyone (as everyone is different), but it's a start, and it should show that there is probably some truth in the things many people tell you about a healthy lifestyle.

    Changing your life can be scary, but it can also have it's benefits.

    Dalboz on
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    ReitenReiten Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Forgot an easy tip. Chew your food well and eat slowly. Your friends and family merely look like a pack of ravenous wolves, they aren't actually going to steal your food. If they actually act like ravenous wolves, use your utensils on them.

    There's a delay (7 min, IIRC) between when your stomach is full and when your brain gets the signals that it's full. Eating slowly means you'll overeat less. Also, when you go out to eat, don't eat everything. Take half home for the next day.

    Reiten on
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    Ant000Ant000 Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Drink water instead of almost all other liquids, and watch the pounds melt away. One of the biggest things a lot of people, especially I find computer junkies, can do to lose weight is simply to cut out all soda, coffee, sports drinks, beer etc. So many empty calories that do nothing to satiate your hunger. Once you drink water long enough you get used to it and things like Coke become disgustingly sweet.

    Edit: Sorry I probably shouldn't have skimmed your OP, as you mentioned you cut out the soda already :). Well, just let my post serve as positive reinforcement, as it really really goes a long way. Once you get off it completely, and get over the caffeine withdrawals, you'll feel better too. I got a friend of mine to cut it out and he eventually hit like a 32 waist from 36, without changing anything else.

    Ant000 on
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    #14#14 Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Ant000 wrote:
    Drink water instead of almost all other liquids, and watch the pounds melt away. One of the biggest things a lot of people, especially I find computer junkies, can do to lose weight is simply to cut out all soda, coffee, sports drinks, beer etc. So many empty calories that do nothing to satiate your hunger. Once you drink water long enough you get used to it and things like Coke become disgustingly sweet.

    Edit: Sorry I probably shouldn't have skimmed your OP, as you mentioned you cut out the soda already :). Well, just let my post serve as positive reinforcement, as it really really goes a long way. Once you get off it completely, and get over the caffeine withdrawals, you'll feel better too. I got a friend of mine to cut it out and he eventually hit like a 32 waist from 36, without changing anything else.

    Awesome. I'll try that.

    But drinking lots of water before I go to sleep is always making me piss like a madman. Which is annoying.

    #14 on
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