As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/
Options

My dog was attacked

ElinElin Registered User regular
edited June 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
At the dog park. A big ass Pit came up and put him down and bit him all up. My dog is only 15 pounds. I wasn't thinking about talking to the owner at that time because my dog was screaming and I wanted to get him out of there. When we got home though I found big, nasty bruised areas on his belly. I called the vet and they said I shouldn't need to bring him in since he wasn't actually bleeding, and to just watch for swelling and abscesses.

My question is, since he's not bleeding I don't really need to be concerned about rabies, correct? He's vaccinated of course, but I don't know about the other dog. I'm just shaken, it's my first dog and I just fell apart when he was getting mauled. I didn't grab the other dog because I didn't want the dog to turn on me ... but now I feel like crap for not wading in and grabbing him out.

Pictures of my baby
puppysleeps.jpg
P1010207.jpg

And some pics of his battle wounds
P1010215.jpg
P1010223.jpg

Switch SW-5832-5050-0149
PSN Hypacia
Xbox HypaciaMinnow
Discord Hypacia#0391
Elin on
«1

Posts

  • Options
    dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    He's fine. If it's a problem that's common to the area (aggressive large dogs unleashed) carry some pepper spray. If you are attacked by a dog, give it your arm to break and dig your fingers into its eyes until it stops moving or runs away. I would not worry about rabies.

    dispatch.o on
  • Options
    FiggyFiggy Fighter of the night man Champion of the sunRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    How badly was he attacked? The pictures don't look serious, but there could be internal injuries. It was a pit bull, after all.

    Figgy on
    XBL : Figment3 · SteamID : Figment
  • Options
    ElinElin Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Well, he's not acting hurt at all. I can press on his belly and he doesn't yelp. He's eating and such and when he peed it was normal. There are a few more marks, maybe 5 in all, but it's hard to see with his fur. The worst marks are on either side of the base of his penis. Poor little man. There are a few marks on his side, and one up near his ribs.

    Elin on
    Switch SW-5832-5050-0149
    PSN Hypacia
    Xbox HypaciaMinnow
    Discord Hypacia#0391
  • Options
    FiggyFiggy Fighter of the night man Champion of the sunRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    It's a good sign that the bites weren't deep enough to cause bleeding, but I would be concerned about crushing damage internally.

    Maybe call another vet or two for a second opinion. Make sure you mention that your tiny dog was attacked by a pit bull.

    Figgy on
    XBL : Figment3 · SteamID : Figment
  • Options
    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    just keep an eye on him. does he guard when you press where he got bit? more than likley he is just going ot be really sore. did your vet give you any pain meds? metacam maybe?.

    i wouldn't worry about "crushing" injuries if he isn't sensitive to the touch its probably nothing. he might develop a hematoma which isn't that big a deal it is just scary looking.

    you are lucky. our dog got in a tussle with a rottweiler and she came away with a half inch puncture wound in her chest that was pretty deep.

    mts on
    camo_sig.png
  • Options
    PojacoPojaco Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Future advice: you don't grab the attacking pit bull, you kick it, nice and hard in the ribs. Then you tell the owner to control his pit bull, so it doesn't give mine a bad name.

    Unless it is illegal, then I wouldn't advise it, though it worked for me once.

    Pojaco on
  • Options
    Dark_SideDark_Side Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Oh man...I totally feel for you, as a pit bull owner myself, we're not all irresponsible. Don't ever wade into a dog fight unless you know what you're doing, and even then you shouldn't. Kick him in the ribs, hard, as said, or get yourself a good stick.

    Those bites don't look bad at all, he was probably just warning him a bit. Pit bulls have a voracious prey drive and a lot of times they don't understand when a small dog plays with them, they can get confused, and then bad stuff happens because they get so wound up they can't stop. It's why mine rarely goes to dog parks, and when he does he stays on leash the entire time.

    Best bet is to make sure when you're in the park you're scoping both owners and their dogs every once in awhile, you can almost always tell which dogs are going to be prone to get in a fight, and there always is at least one. And then keep your pooch away from those dogs, people might get offended, but that's their problem.

    Edit: As to the rabies I'm not sure. It's doubtful the other dog had rabies, but your vet should be able to answer that question better.

    Dark_Side on
  • Options
    PolloDiabloPolloDiablo Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    If it doesn't seem in pain when you press on the injured areas, it's probably ok. Dogs don't normally show pain unless it's really bad, but if he'll let you touch the bites like that, chances are it's not too serious.

    So long as he keeps acting normally, there's no reason for concern.

    PolloDiablo on
  • Options
    LadyMLadyM Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I'm sorry for your dog. The fact that he's eating and not showing signs of pain is good.

    Always keep a close eye on your dog in a dog park--all too often there is some jackass there who doesn't care what his dog is doing or some stupid owner who is trying to "socialize" the dog aggressiveness out of his dog as it snaps and snarls at all the other dogs. Frankly, I would try to avoid dog parks altogether in the future since your dog is so small and could be seriously injured/killed so easily . . . not even from aggression, necessarily, but even from play. (Imagine some over-excited, half-grown large puppy bouncing on your dog . . . That could break his back.) I would try to find some other small breed dog owners to arrange playdates in someone's yard.

    LadyM on
  • Options
    stawkstawk Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    only thing i would really be concerned about is how your dog is going to react next time you take him to the park. My dog got attacked when we were on a walk once and for years after that she refused to walk past the house where the dogs were. She would pull on the leash and try her hardest to go down other streets.

    on a lighter note i was out for a walk with her and we kept getting stalked by a cat. Eventually the cat worked up the nerve to try and pounce on my dog, without even thinking i grabbed this by the tail in mid pounce and just whipped him away. you dont mess with my pack...

    stawk on

    stawk.jpg
  • Options
    dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I had a boxer-rot mix when I was growing up that weighed 160lbs at 3 years old. She thought she was a big puppy and would lay on your legs when you went to bed, cutting off the circulation. When lightning would strike she would burrow her head under the bed and scramble with her back feet on the tile trying to shove the rest of her body underneath.

    If you kicked the dog in the ribs, hard... she would have probably turned and snapped your femur. (we used to give her cow femurs and she would crack them in half easily). When dealing with a Pitt or a big mix with a locking jaw that can exert that kind of pressure, I would keep my limbs out of the fray. Just spend the 11$ on a can of pepper spray and hose both dogs if you have to to get them apart, it will be traumatic but you wont really have a lot of time for aiming and a slightly injured dog that needs a hose-down is better than a huge frenzied dog a broken leg/missing face and a dead puppy.

    Also, if you put yourself between your dog and any other dogs that look to be a threat and yell at the owner, don't move when you yell, especially towards the owner. Even abused or anti-social dogs will protect what they see as their master.

    If a dog runs at you, do not run away. Back up slowly and avoid locking eyes, it may still consider it a challenge and come up towards you, but if you don't run it should give you time enough to pull out the pepper spray.


    As an aside, that dog I mentioned above got hit by a car and came home with scraped "elbows" and the car horn in her mouth. The PG&E guy hadn't closed the gate all the way and our neighbor deliberately tried to kill her in his VW beetle. He was a dick, we let her keep the horn as a toy to bury in the back yard, I also put skunk oil in his AC intake. Don't fuck with my pets, they are family. As I'm sure your guy is to you, I am glad he is okay and I hope you get some pepper spray.

    dispatch.o on
  • Options
    ElinElin Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I think we're going to change dog parks. There's a new one opening in the city with a separate small dog area. What happened as far as I can figure it is this: the pit came up when we walked in and mouthed my dog on the neck to say "I'm in charge here." My dog has an issue with being mounted and reacted like that's what the pit was doing - he growled and snapped at him. The pit said "fuck you little dog, I'm in charge" and put him on the ground. I'm thinking if the pit was fighting for serious my dog would be dead right now, that things head was higher than my waist. Mind you, before this happened my dog was happily playing sniff ass with a shepherd , a chow, and a lab, and regularly plays with a rottie and 2 boxers at that same park. I like big dogs, and if you train then right, they're great. I'm not even sure that the pit owner was in the wrong in this situation, objectively, as my dog did snap at theirs, even though it was after that dog pulled a dominance move. I got my guy from the pound, and he was stray for a while, who knows what he went through? He seems to let little dogs bully him (like the teacup yorkie in my complex) but anything his size or bigger he stands up to (like my cat.)

    If I do decide to go to a dog park with larger size dogs again I'll definitely get some dog formulated pepper spray. I know that's what they use at doggie day cares to separate actual fights, it just never occurred to me that I would need it at the dog park. Naive of me, but eh.

    Elin on
    Switch SW-5832-5050-0149
    PSN Hypacia
    Xbox HypaciaMinnow
    Discord Hypacia#0391
  • Options
    Track NineTrack Nine Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Okay, practically speaking you should be keeping those wounds clean and dabbing them down with antiseptic twice a day for a day or two. Having seen what can happen to an untreated/infected bite or scratch it's far better to err on the side of caution and take a few small easy steps to make sure the wounds don't become infected. As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure (and a pound of cure at vet prices is damn expensive).

    It doesn't look like there are any actual puncture wounds so I'd say that despite how rough the attack may have looked, you got off easy. Bruising looks nasty, but you should be paying more attention to your dog's behaviour and particularily appetite and poop. If either start becoming irregular or a concern then there may be reason for further worry and a checkup at the vet. Otherwise, he's just gong to be tender for a while.

    For what it's worth you weren't the only one with dog problems yesterday. My dog got attacked too while out on the beach and her injuries are very similar to your dog's.

    A bit of advice - I don't know where you live but if you're going to take a dog to a social area like a park/beach etc then you might want to consider getting a ball chucker. It's basically a plastic arm with a cup which grasps a tennis ball at the end. Not only do they make throwing a ball for your dog a lot easier, but they can be used to great effect in beating another dog away without risking your hands/arms/legs. Even if your dog doesn't like to play fetch, you can still carry one around on walks for security without it looking out of place.

    Track Nine on
  • Options
    VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Pits have a bad rep but Poms are little shits and despite their size have no issues barking and snapping at much larger dogs which causes problems. You really should take him only to dog parks with small dog areas in the future. It's just easier.

    Edit: I say this as an owner of a 16 year old Pom that is still a little shit when she wants to be.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • Options
    underdonkunderdonk __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2009
    'Tis the nature of the beast with dog parks. My pup was attacked and bitten (ear) at the dog park about a year ago. We stopped going. Luckily the owner of the other dog was great and offered to pay vet bills and help out in any way she could, etc. Sounds like your pup will be fine, and don't feel bad about not stepping in and trying to stop what was happening, dog fight are incredibly scary and you have a high probably of getting hurt in the process of breaking one up. Cute dog!

    underdonk on
    Back in the day, bucko, we just had an A and a B button... and we liked it.
  • Options
    NargorothRiPNargorothRiP Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Nothing pisses me off more when walking my dog then assholes with their dog off the leash. Some dumbass had his two golden labs off the leash and they came around the corner and surrounded my pit nipping at his heels and shit. he spun on the back one and tore his ass up. I really hate to sound like a dick, but if you cant control your dog and keep it on a leash you fully deserve what happens to it.

    NargorothRiP on
  • Options
    King KongKing Kong Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I have a pit that was attacked by two other pits, me and her were in the paper and on the news. I just don't understand why people who own a breed like I do, and while it has all the negative imagery don't take better care to control their dog.

    I always have her on a leash and I've come to find out that dog parks are about the stupidest idea ever after having 3 different people I know have their dogs bitten.

    I would take your dog to the vet, my dog had internal bruising and they gave her same pain meds and ointment for the laceration on her forearm.

    Best advice I can give is when you have a big dog like that don't get mauled. My pit was attacked by two others and I ran in without thinking and pulled them apart with my hands which is about the stupidest thing I've ever done.
    you don't grab the attacking pit bull, you kick it, nice and hard in the ribs.

    This is probably the dumbest thing I will hear all day. My pit would just yelp and get more pissed if this happened to her and then proceed to devour a limb of her choosing.

    King Kong on
  • Options
    rfaliasrfalias Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Bad dog owners should be put down.
    End of story.

    rfalias on
  • Options
    ThylacineThylacine Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I really hate to sound like a dick, but if you cant control your dog and keep it on a leash you fully deserve what happens to it.

    Except the fact she was in a dog park, which is a place you can go and let your dog off leash

    I'd say the pit's owner was more in the wrong for not keeping an eye on his dog if he knows it's dog aggressive towards smaller dogs that it could injure. Though I think the OP has the right idea staying away from the bigger dogs and going to a park just for smaller ones. It sucks since the dog plays well with most bigger dogs, but at that size it'd only take a couple seconds for a big dog to do some harm a lot worse that what already happened so it's just not worth it.

    Edit: I don't really know how I feel about dog parks. They sound good in theory, if people were responsible and 'know their dog' but even the best dogs can have bad days. Also, as is seen, a lot of people aren't honest with themselves if their dogs can handle something like that. Off leash shouldn't mean unsupervised, and it doesn't seem like the pits owner tried to talk with the OP...or perhaps even notice.

    Thylacine on
  • Options
    CasualCasual Wiggle Wiggle Wiggle Flap Flap Flap Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    You did the right thing not grabbing the other dog. If your dog gets in a fight NEVER try and separate them, either dog could easily turn on you in the heat of the moment. As bad as it sounds it's better that the dog gets mauled than you.

    If the vet says just sit and wait it out that's what you should do, just make sure he has an easy time for a while.

    Casual on
  • Options
    KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I would skip the pepper spray and get an air horn instead. Pepper spray can easily blow back in your dog's face and in your face. An air horn will likely startle your dog too but it won't incapacitate in any way. It will (hopefully) startle the other dog enough to give you time to grab your dog and get out of there.

    Saliva in scrapes could theoretically transmit rabies. But there is a very low likelihood that the other dog has rabies. How old is your dog? There has never even been a suspected case of rabies in a dog that has had two rabies vaccines (ie 6 mos and 18 mos). If your dog is young enough that it has only ever had a single rabies vaccine and that was over 6 months ago it is theoretically safer to get your dog his second booster early. But canine rabies is vanishingly rare in the US. If you live in a rural area there is more risk than if you live in an urban area because the very few cases of rabies in the US each year are generally in dogs that have free access to wander in the woods and come into contact with raccoons. If you don't live in the US you can probably find information online about the canine rabies rates in your country.

    IMHO from your description I would say that both dogs contributed to the fight. And it definitely sounds like posturing and not a predatory fight. Big dogs have big heads and when they go to sniff a little dog their heads tend to be above the little dog and coming down to sniff. The pit probably hasn't spent enough time around tiny dogs to figure out how to say hi to them without completely dominating their space. Your dog took offense and snapped and the pit didn't back down. Pit bulls are terriers. If they want to kill something they don't roll it over, they grab it by the neck, hold tight and shake.

    I occasionally go to the dog park with my cocker but we only go inside if I recognize all the dogs and owners. If there is a new dog we watch for 10-15 minutes outside before making a decision and then I sometimes will ask the new owner a few questions before letting my dog off leash. There is no reason a particular dog should like all other dogs. I know that my dog likes to sniff all the dog's butts and then run around for a bit. However he doesn't like being chased so if a dog is there chasing other dogs we don't go in. We also don't go in if there are any grumpy old dogs that will take offense to a long butt sniff from a youngster like mine. I know that my dog has very "up" body language and no tail and floppy ears so he is hard for some dogs to read. I also watch out for other dogs that use subtle or no body language because my dog will respect other dogs asking for some space, but he is bad at subtlety.

    I think going to a dog park with only little dogs is a very good idea. As other people have pointed out a big dog tripping and falling on your dog could cause more injury than what happened in this fight. It also sounds like your dog is a lot more relaxed around little dogs.

    Kistra on
    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
  • Options
    illigillig Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    with a long haired dog you really need to inspect every inch of her for puncture wounds... they hide very easily, and can get infected, etc.... if you're not comfortable doing this, take her to a vet who will find any, shave them, and show you how to keep them open and clean to allow draining

    that said, what attacked your dog was not a pit... pits are 35-55 lbs tops.... anything larger (higher than your waist? jeez) is some sort of a mastiff, dogo argentino, or whatever mix... i'm sensitive to this b/c i have a pit, and she gets a bad name everytime someone just assumes an attacking dog was a pit

    illig on
  • Options
    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    this doesn't sound the dog was "attacked " in that the dog was just sitting there minding its own buisness than bitey bitey. from what the OP described it sounds like a pissing contest between two strong personality dogs. unfortunately for the OP his dog is a toy and ulitmately lost based on his size.

    for future reference if you want to pull a dog off another grab it by its hind legs and walk away from it. should have someone on the other dog. don't bother trying to kick or hit it with a stick or pepper spray. its the only effective way to seperate. sure some of th ebully breeds that lock down may need more motivation, but the wheel barrel works.

    most of the advice here is retarded and sounds like it came froma maxim magazine or how to book

    mts on
    camo_sig.png
  • Options
    BloodySlothBloodySloth Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Pits have a bad rep but Poms are little shits and despite their size have no issues barking and snapping at much larger dogs which causes problems. You really should take him only to dog parks with small dog areas in the future. It's just easier.

    Edit: I say this as an owner of a 16 year old Pom that is still a little shit when she wants to be.

    I dunno, this sounds just as backwards as saying all pits are little shits. Little dogs turn into spoiled bastards most often because people treat them like little dogs without realizing that the dog thinks it's just as capable and powerful as any other mutt out there. Poms aren't genetically destined to be violent snappers just like Pits aren't predetermined to be murderers.

    BloodySloth on
  • Options
    King KongKing Kong Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    that said, what attacked your dog was not a pit... pits are 35-55 lbs tops

    My pit weighed 76 pounds at her last check, albeit she is overweight, and is a UKC purebred.

    King Kong on
  • Options
    KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    mts wrote: »
    this doesn't sound the dog was "attacked " in that the dog was just sitting there minding its own buisness than bitey bitey. from what the OP described it sounds like a pissing contest between two strong personality dogs. unfortunately for the OP his dog is a toy and ulitmately lost based on his size.

    for future reference if you want to pull a dog off another grab it by its hind legs and walk away from it. should have someone on the other dog. don't bother trying to kick or hit it with a stick or pepper spray. its the only effective way to seperate. sure some of th ebully breeds that lock down may need more motivation, but the wheel barrel works.

    most of the advice here is retarded and sounds like it came froma maxim magazine or how to book

    That is the best way to physically separate a real dog fight but I wouldn't do that at a dog park to a dog I didn't know. Too much risk of redirection. One can use a blanket or a rug to protect themselves but those generally aren't common at dog parks.

    The fight in question also wasn't that kind of a fight. The dog in question wasn't bitten (at least those look like scrapes and not puncture wounds) and it doesn't sound like blood was pouring from the other dog either. Startling the dogs and separating them would be possible without wheelbarrowing them because neither dog was holding onto the other.

    Kistra on
    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
  • Options
    Dark_SideDark_Side Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    King Kong wrote: »
    that said, what attacked your dog was not a pit... pits are 35-55 lbs tops

    My pit weighed 76 pounds at her last check, albeit she is overweight, and is a UKC purebred.

    Pits as a generic description usually incorporate a few different breeds. The Staffordshire Terrier is usually smaller and stocky, my "pit" is actually probably an American Bulldog, which is closely related to the English Bulldog. When England went through the industrial evolution, their bulldogs didn't need to be working dogs anymore, so they continued to get smaller and became the dogs you see today. The American Bulldog was brought over from England (back when their bulldogs were bigger) to the states specifically as a working dog and has retained those characteristics. Mine is about 70 odd pounds when he eats regularly.

    Dark_Side on
  • Options
    King KongKing Kong Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Right, mines an actual APBT that weighs that over 70 pounds. So to say they only get 50 or so I had to disagree with.

    King Kong on
  • Options
    KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    King Kong wrote: »
    Right, mines an actual APBT that weighs that over 70 pounds. So to say they only get 50 or so I had to disagree with.

    Okay, but Dark_Side is correct regarding what APBTs are supposed to weigh. Your dog is well outside of the norm or quite overweight (or both).

    From the UKC breed standard:
    HEIGHT AND WEIGHT

    The American Pit Bull Terrier must be both powerful and agile so actual weight and height are less important than the correct proportion of weight to height. Desirable weight for a mature male in good condition is between 35 and 60 pounds. Desirable weight for a mature female in good condition is between 30 and 50 pounds.

    Also many people don't mean APBT when they say pitbull. Most "pitbulls" in the US shelter system are american staffordshire terrier mixes and Amstaffs are even smaller than APBTs. It isn't unreasonable to suggest that a dog whose head came up past the OPs waist likely wasn't a pitbull by either definition.

    Kistra on
    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
  • Options
    Dark_SideDark_Side Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Kistra wrote: »
    King Kong wrote: »
    Right, mines an actual APBT that weighs that over 70 pounds. So to say they only get 50 or so I had to disagree with.

    Okay, but Dark_Side is correct regarding what APBTs are supposed to weigh. Your dog is well outside of the norm or quite overweight (or both).

    From the UKC breed standard:
    HEIGHT AND WEIGHT

    The American Pit Bull Terrier must be both powerful and agile so actual weight and height are less important than the correct proportion of weight to height. Desirable weight for a mature male in good condition is between 35 and 60 pounds. Desirable weight for a mature female in good condition is between 30 and 50 pounds.

    Also many people don't mean APBT when they say pitbull. Most "pitbulls" in the US shelter system are american staffordshire terrier mixes and Amstaffs are even smaller than APBTs. It isn't unreasonable to suggest that a dog whose head came up past the OPs waist likely wasn't a pitbull by either definition.

    Well, I'm as sensitive about Pit Bull breeds as anyone since I own a dog always referred to as one. The fact of the matter is that if you have a dog with a certain build and facial structure, it doesn't matter what his actual breed is, the general public is going to refer to that dog as a pit. Which sucks, but that's just how it is. Regardless OP, I'm glad your dog is ok, but you're probably are going to want to stick to small dog dog parks in the future, or barring that setting up play dates.

    Dark_Side on
  • Options
    FyreWulffFyreWulff YouRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited June 2009
    Dog parks are a bad idea. This guy at the following site loathes them, and he's pretty authorative on the subject.

    Warning: graphic wound pictures, NFSW.

    http://leerburg.com/dogfight.htm

    Not jumping on you though. You did the best you could - don't feel bad for not jumping in because there was nothing you could do. Your dog is more than likely going to have issues with this event.

    FyreWulff on
  • Options
    SentrySentry Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    FyreWulff wrote: »
    Dog parks are a bad idea. This guy at the following site loathes them, and he's pretty authorative on the subject.

    Warning: graphic wound pictures, NFSW.

    http://leerburg.com/dogfight.htm

    Not jumping on you though. You did the best you could - don't feel bad for not jumping in because there was nothing you could do. Your dog is more than likely going to have issues with this event.

    Dog parks aren't a bad idea at all. You just have to realize that when you get a bunch of dogs together, occasionally, something can happen. My dog got bit at the dog park, but the owner learned his lesson and he stopped bringing a dog he couldn't control there. But seriously, dog parks are awesome...

    Sentry on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • Options
    ElinElin Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    You're right, when I said Pit, I meant something in the Bully breed family. He could have been a Staff mix, or a Dogo. I saw a very large, muscular, squared headed, white dog with large brown patches come at my boy. He's 5, or so the vet estimates, and since he was fixed when they picked him up I assume he got all the regular puppy shots. He got his rabies shot when I got him 2 months ago, along with his normal boosters. I haven't seen anything through his fur but I've been checking for tender spots with my hands. I can touch him anywhere and he doesn't act uncomfortable or defensive. He lets me touch his bruises and they don't feel swollen, and even when fresh there was no bleeding so I don't think the skin is broken. Thanks for confirming that I should stay out of dog fights, I knew it but I still felt bad standing back.

    I'm going to see how the small dog area works out. He's always ignored the small dogs to play with the big boys, his best friend at the park was an Irish Wolfhound. Seeing him jump up to take a sniff made the Hounds owner crack up. I'm sure he'll make little friends but he's not really aware he's small himself. And as far as I know he's a mix of 2 territorial breeds, the Pom and the American Eskimo. It's just never been an issue until this last time, but I guess that's how it always goes.

    And yeah, it was an off leash dog park, otherwise he is always leashed. I always short leash him around other dogs and only let him go sniff if the owner says it's ok. We have good walking manners.

    He also only warns off other animals. When we first got him I was careful to make sure I could be around him when eating, in fact, he would only eat from my hand at first. Now I can play in his food dish when he's eating, or take it, and he just looks at me all sad eyed. My cat however, gets a growl if he's too close to the bowl. I'm still learning about him, the longer he's here, the more he's changing. I'm attributing it to having been stray, and then in the shelter. They said he came in with another dog and he was playing protector to the other dog, making sure it was ok and such. I guess that means he's a dominant dog and that's what this incident was about. I do normally follow him around to make sure he's ok there for the first 10 minutes or so, and then again when new guys come in, but this happened about 1 minute after we stepped in, and so fast I couldn't stop it. My husband said if the dogs owner hadn't come running over he was going to brain it with the water dish we brought, I told him he was a dumb ass.

    Elin on
    Switch SW-5832-5050-0149
    PSN Hypacia
    Xbox HypaciaMinnow
    Discord Hypacia#0391
  • Options
    FyreWulffFyreWulff YouRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited June 2009
    FyreWulff on
  • Options
    SentrySentry Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    FyreWulff wrote: »

    I know. I read it. And I disagree with it completely. It reads like someone who has never set foot in a dog park. Yes, fights happen, but they are few and far between and the owners usually have the sense not to come back. They are not the dog fighting pits he makes them out to be.

    Sentry on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • Options
    FyreWulffFyreWulff YouRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited June 2009
    I know it's almost like he has 30 years experience with dogs or something

    FyreWulff on
  • Options
    SentrySentry Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    FyreWulff wrote: »
    I know it's almost like he has 30 years experience with dogs or something

    Is he like, your father or something? I didn't mean to offend your family. I've taken my Samoyed to the dog park 3-5 times a week for two years and have had one bad experience.

    It's almost like, I've actually been there, and stuff.

    Sentry on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • Options
    Dark_SideDark_Side Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Oh man, I've read through Leerburg's entire site because my dog has some dominant tendencies I'm trying to ween out of him. He has some really good basic, no frills advice in there about establishing the dog's role in a household, but if you spend enough time with the site, you'll realize he's blowing more than a little smoke.

    He kind of comes off as needlessly ruthless to me, which makes sense when dealing with aggressive dogs, but for everyday kind of problems, his methods strike me as too severe. So when you read that article, you have to read it as someone with a large, aggressive breed, because that's who it's wrote for. A person like me. Because I'm taking a huge liability risk even walking into a park with my dog. If he gets in a fight, even one he doesn't instigate, I'm the one who's going to be held responsible when he kills or maims someone's dog.

    Dark_Side on
  • Options
    The LandoStanderThe LandoStander Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    On the subject of the pepper spray. If you do decide to go that route double check to see if your state has regulations regarding the use of it. I know some states like New Jersey actually require you to be licensed in order to carry pepper spray, I don't know if it differs for "dog" pepper spray, but it is something to consider.

    I wouldn't really try hauling, kicking or whacking a dog with a stick etc. The potential for a bite exists as well as an issue with the other dog's owner. As this thread has shown people are serious about their pets and how to treat them so I wouldn't assume that every owner would understand that you had to kick or spray their dog. I'm not saying that the law or whatever wouldn't wind up being on your side if things came to that but a dog fight is bad enough without adding a human fight as well.

    Small dog parks aren't a bad idea, just keep in mind that little dogs can get pretty fierce too. My mother's little poodle has teeth like needles and she's put a hole or two into my pug's skin just in random play. Keep the wounds clean of course. I assume you brush your little pet pretty frequently so that's a good time to make sure you've found all the bites.

    The LandoStander on
    Maybe someday, they'll see a hero's just a man. Who knows he's free.
  • Options
    KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Wow. That site has a lot of absolutely horrible advice.

    Dominance
    : most people completely misunderstand it and it doesn't apply to pet dogs and all and doesn't actually apply to wolves the way people think.

    You can be your dog's leader and who they look to when they aren't sure about something without bothering with outdated dominance theories. Sue Ailsby and Shirley Chong have variations on the NILIF programs that explain how to go about doing this (their programs can even be used together).

    You also might look at Karen Overall's Relaxation protocol. She developed it to work with her dog Flash. It basically teaches the dog to ignore whatever is going on around them. The more your dog is comfortable ignoring the less likely they are to react to anything.

    Kistra on
    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
Sign In or Register to comment.