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Charcuterie 101 - The Silence you hear is the meat deliciousifying...

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Posts

  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    you have to cook it

    typically you make it in the oven, but it's low/slow for sure

    yup low and slow, I have a dehydrator as well but after doing it in the smoker I haven't bothered with it again.

    Xaquin
  • FaranguFarangu I am a beardy man With a beardy planRegistered User regular
    darkmayo wrote: »
    Farangu wrote: »
    I am sad that the smoker has to reside in the garage until March/April

    unless you are getting a ton of rain or snow you can still smoke, coldest I have done it at was -15 Celsius with my WSM.

    Really? The metal feels too thin to really keep heat in, and I got a lot of temperature variation when it got quite windy on thanksgiving.

  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    Farangu wrote: »
    darkmayo wrote: »
    Farangu wrote: »
    I am sad that the smoker has to reside in the garage until March/April

    unless you are getting a ton of rain or snow you can still smoke, coldest I have done it at was -15 Celsius with my WSM.

    Really? The metal feels too thin to really keep heat in, and I got a lot of temperature variation when it got quite windy on thanksgiving.

    Just did ribs 3/2/1 style so they were in foil for 2 hours of it. It wasn't a windy day when I did it at -15 so that helped too. You use more charcoal to maintain the heat but it works just fine, if it still needs some cooking toss em in the oven for a bit after, at that point they are about as smokey as they will get. Not sure I would want to do anything like a brisket in that weather unless I had modded my WSM with temp controller.

  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Get over yourself. Registered User regular
    So I upped my smoke game from a couple of Terracotta pots to a Char Griller Akorn Kamado grill.

    I love this thing. Easy to bring to temp, easy to maintain temp, and it looks pretty good. Only problem being is 1) it was missing a latch for the ash try so I have to ghetto rig some zip ties to get a seal while I wait for the latch to come in the mail and 2) there's some leaks going on somewhere because it's taking a long ass time to extinguish the flame after closing the vents. 1 is no big deal and 2 can be fix with some RTF gasket material or nomex felt.

    One day I'll own a honest to goodness ceramic smoker but until then I'll enjoy this Akorn.

    steam_sig.png
    Xaquindarkmayospool32
  • FaranguFarangu I am a beardy man With a beardy planRegistered User regular
    Question for you all - what basic guidelines do you use for how long to brine meat for? I have some pork loin that I want to brine and smoke for a work thing coming up in like three weeks, and the last time I did brining(corned beef) the meat didn't have pink salt penetrate to the center, because it was standard done-beef gray instead of that pink-salt-infused pink/red.

  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Get over yourself. Registered User regular
    When I brine corn beef I let it seat in the brine for 7 days.

    I imagine there's no real upper limit of how long they can sit in brine (well, besides the meat going bad) but I always had good luck with 7 days of wet brine.

    steam_sig.png
  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    Man when the desire to smoke large portions of meat hits me I just have to do it.

    Friend of mine gifted me a brisket last month, with the caveat that it might be freezer burnt. With the weather being ok this weekend I finally took it out and started to thaw it. From the get go it looked like it was hit pretty bad with the burn and after it thawed more I saw how much of it was ruined.


    All of it. Completely toast and freeze dried. :(

    Unfortunately I wanted brisket so I went out and bought a 9 1/2 pounds of meaty goodness.


    Salt and Cracked Pepper for the rub.

    ahluqlsg5noy.jpg

    Thats just half of it.

    6jhkb5yd2jmt.jpg

    Coals were still going strong by the time the brisket was getting close to done.. so I threw some ribs on as well and baked some bread (not in a smoker..)

    evtqvwyw3vxt.jpg

    while I love my WSM 18" I think I am going to have to drop some coinage on a serious offset smoker.

    CauldbowenchromdomKetarVishNubGONG-00XaquinCasually Hardcorespool32
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Get over yourself. Registered User regular
    edited April 23
    I don't know. If you want to smoke and nothing more then I suggest electric smokers.They're just easy. Set the temperature, get a smoke going, walk away. Doubly so if you invest in a pid of some sort. I'm tempted to find a mini fridge and drill a hole to fit in a heating element and have it be a dedicated smoker. I also wonder if I can outfit a square box thing with a window a/c unit and use it for cold smoking.

    Casually Hardcore on
    steam_sig.png
  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    I don't know. If you want to smoke and nothing more, then I suggest electric smokers.They're just easy. Set the temperature, get a smoke going, walk away. Doubly so if you invest in a pid of some sort. I'm tempted to find a mini fridge and drill a fit in a heating element and have it be a dedicated smoker. I also wonder if I can outfit a square box thing with a window a/c unit and use it for cold smoking.

    I have an electric as well, I mainly use it for poultry and other meats that I don't really care if there is a smoke ring or not, but it is never as good as my WSM, nor is it as fun. I'd like to move onto wood fueled heat but that is another level of challenge. Plus being in Canada we don't have the same wood that is in the south. I cant just get a cord of Mesquite or Hickory that easy, I do ok with getting wood chunks from the local BBQ specialty store but normally its wood chips.

    for cold smoking I use a little chief electric smoker that I got from a friend (its just a little younger than I am)

  • breton-brawlerbreton-brawler Registered User regular
    darkmayo wrote: »
    I don't know. If you want to smoke and nothing more, then I suggest electric smokers.They're just easy. Set the temperature, get a smoke going, walk away. Doubly so if you invest in a pid of some sort. I'm tempted to find a mini fridge and drill a fit in a heating element and have it be a dedicated smoker. I also wonder if I can outfit a square box thing with a window a/c unit and use it for cold smoking.

    I have an electric as well, I mainly use it for poultry and other meats that I don't really care if there is a smoke ring or not, but it is never as good as my WSM, nor is it as fun. I'd like to move onto wood fueled heat but that is another level of challenge. Plus being in Canada we don't have the same wood that is in the south. I cant just get a cord of Mesquite or Hickory that easy, I do ok with getting wood chunks from the local BBQ specialty store but normally its wood chips.

    for cold smoking I use a little chief electric smoker that I got from a friend (its just a little younger than I am)

    A neat thing I learned about a local BBQ restaurant up here in New Brunswick is that they actually use Sugar maple. Local, readily available, and has a subtle flavor. I sampled some at their restaurant and found it was very good. I plan on trying some food experiments with the sugar maple over the summer.

  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    darkmayo wrote: »
    I don't know. If you want to smoke and nothing more, then I suggest electric smokers.They're just easy. Set the temperature, get a smoke going, walk away. Doubly so if you invest in a pid of some sort. I'm tempted to find a mini fridge and drill a fit in a heating element and have it be a dedicated smoker. I also wonder if I can outfit a square box thing with a window a/c unit and use it for cold smoking.

    I have an electric as well, I mainly use it for poultry and other meats that I don't really care if there is a smoke ring or not, but it is never as good as my WSM, nor is it as fun. I'd like to move onto wood fueled heat but that is another level of challenge. Plus being in Canada we don't have the same wood that is in the south. I cant just get a cord of Mesquite or Hickory that easy, I do ok with getting wood chunks from the local BBQ specialty store but normally its wood chips.

    for cold smoking I use a little chief electric smoker that I got from a friend (its just a little younger than I am)

    A neat thing I learned about a local BBQ restaurant up here in New Brunswick is that they actually use Sugar maple. Local, readily available, and has a subtle flavor. I sampled some at their restaurant and found it was very good. I plan on trying some food experiments with the sugar maple over the summer.


    Alberta here.. we got pine.. and pine and spruce.. and pine.

  • BouwsTBouwsT Wanna come to a super soft birthday party? Registered User regular
    darkmayo wrote: »
    darkmayo wrote: »
    I don't know. If you want to smoke and nothing more, then I suggest electric smokers.They're just easy. Set the temperature, get a smoke going, walk away. Doubly so if you invest in a pid of some sort. I'm tempted to find a mini fridge and drill a fit in a heating element and have it be a dedicated smoker. I also wonder if I can outfit a square box thing with a window a/c unit and use it for cold smoking.

    I have an electric as well, I mainly use it for poultry and other meats that I don't really care if there is a smoke ring or not, but it is never as good as my WSM, nor is it as fun. I'd like to move onto wood fueled heat but that is another level of challenge. Plus being in Canada we don't have the same wood that is in the south. I cant just get a cord of Mesquite or Hickory that easy, I do ok with getting wood chunks from the local BBQ specialty store but normally its wood chips.

    for cold smoking I use a little chief electric smoker that I got from a friend (its just a little younger than I am)

    A neat thing I learned about a local BBQ restaurant up here in New Brunswick is that they actually use Sugar maple. Local, readily available, and has a subtle flavor. I sampled some at their restaurant and found it was very good. I plan on trying some food experiments with the sugar maple over the summer.


    Alberta here.. we got pine.. and pine and spruce.. and pine.

    Alberta: If it's good enough for your car vent, it's good enough for your smoker.

    I shall be telling this with a sigh
    Somewhere ages and ages hence:
    Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Get over yourself. Registered User regular
    Purchased one of these

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00UI018B2?psc=1

    and it's a god send. It holds temperature so goddamn well. Once it reaches the setpoint, it stays there. Before I had to constantly tweak the vents (and it gets frustrating when it gets windy) every hour or two. Now I can just turn off my brain and wait for my temp alarm to indicate that my food is cooked.

    steam_sig.png
    darkmayo
  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    Purchased one of these

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00UI018B2?psc=1

    and it's a god send. It holds temperature so goddamn well. Once it reaches the setpoint, it stays there. Before I had to constantly tweak the vents (and it gets frustrating when it gets windy) every hour or two. Now I can just turn off my brain and wait for my temp alarm to indicate that my food is cooked.

    Nice, was looking into a comparable device for my WSM, lots of models and mods out there for remote temp control etc.

  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    Was a jerky sort of weekend.
    it5qvynmy4qj.jpg

    XaquinSimpsoniabowenCasually HardcoreCommander ZoomKetarLaOs
  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    First time doing beef ribs yesterday. Salt and Cracked Pepper rub, smoker was around 225-250 for most of the smoke, used Mesquite. Put the ribs on at about 10:20am and they were done at around 2:30 (if I recall correctly) Ribs got to an internal temp of around 200 (same as I get my briskets to)
    Very rich, unlike pork ribs I could only eat about 3 before I was full of meaty goodness.
    i1pmdz05ags1.jpg
    3b1yrtwphnph.jpg
    y8ni8som9ni2.jpg
    tlyag88udk5a.jpg
    2ladmycecusm.jpg

    bowenXaquinTNTrooperchromdomNijaCauldHandgimpKetar
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    So I picked up a big, 15lbs, brisket from Costco that I want to split and smoke one half on the Traegar this weekend. Problem i've run into is that after some cursory research i'm a little confused on how I should go about breaking it down. If i'm understanding it correctly I should be splitting the point and flat on the thick end of the brisket, where they are separated by a layer of fat and the grains go in different directions? I want to leave most of the fat cap on it, right? I would think that it needs the cap during a long cook.

    Any one have pointers/experience/a good video of breaking down a brisket?

    darkmayo
  • m!ttensm!ttens Registered User regular
    @Carpy

    You've probably already smoked your brisket by now, but here are some pointers from my experience with cooking a few briskets from Costco (that price for USDA Prime beef almost feels like stealing!). Shave the fat cap down to ~0.25 inch (0.5 cm). You want a layer thick enough to keep the meat from drying out, but any more than that is just going to leave a gross blob of fat you have to cut off when its finished cooking and you'll lose any bark that formed if you slice the fat cap after cooking.

    You're right about the point and flat basically running in separate directions. There is a layer of fat in between the two muscles as well, but it doesn't run in a single plane. You'll need to make some smaller cuts and peel back as you work. This is a pretty solid video that shows the technique for breaking down the brisket into the point and flat:

    Xaquindarkmayo
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Hah, that's exactly the video I used as a guide.

    Costco was selling the prime packers cut for less than half the unit price of their choice flats. Felt like I was stealing or something.

    The smoke went great. Got up at 530, rubbed the meat down and had it on the grill by 545. Let it smoke for 8 hours, flipping it once halfway through. Then tossed it in in foil with about a quarter cup of beer and let it go for another 2 hours at about 225. Once it came out it rested in a beer cooler for about 45 minutes while I drove to the in-laws. Only issue I ran into was my foil ripped when I pulled it out so I lost all that delicious liquid. Going to use a light foil bake pan next time to avoid that.

    Here's the requisite pictures

    Post smoke pre-foil
    6f0mjk95wpns.jpg

    Post cook
    9biz3yw6y22w.jpg

    The business
    ahbz13lh5t1d.jpg

    Rub was basically this without the onion powder. I used chipotle and ancho for the peppers. My butchering wasn't as clean as i'd like but it's a pretty easy cut.

    NytewarriorbowendarkmayoXaquinVishNubchromdom
  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    Carpy wrote: »
    Hah, that's exactly the video I used as a guide.

    Costco was selling the prime packers cut for less than half the unit price of their choice flats. Felt like I was stealing or something.

    The smoke went great. Got up at 530, rubbed the meat down and had it on the grill by 545. Let it smoke for 8 hours, flipping it once halfway through. Then tossed it in in foil with about a quarter cup of beer and let it go for another 2 hours at about 225. Once it came out it rested in a beer cooler for about 45 minutes while I drove to the in-laws. Only issue I ran into was my foil ripped when I pulled it out so I lost all that delicious liquid. Going to use a light foil bake pan next time to avoid that.

    Here's the requisite pictures

    Post smoke pre-foil
    6f0mjk95wpns.jpg

    Post cook
    9biz3yw6y22w.jpg

    The business
    ahbz13lh5t1d.jpg

    Rub was basically this without the onion powder. I used chipotle and ancho for the peppers. My butchering wasn't as clean as i'd like but it's a pretty easy cut.

    beauty

    bowenXaquin
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