As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/
Options

Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince

DVGDVG No. 1 Honor StudentNether Institute, Evil AcademyRegistered User regular
edited August 2009 in Debate and/or Discourse
The Boy Who Lived Returns to the Big Screen Tonight at midnight.

The film currently holds a rare 98% on RT, based on 41 reviews.

Differences from the book, to get it out of the way:
There are a number of changes from the book in the film. Much of the book's ending has been changed, with the climactic battle and Dumbledore's funeral being removed. Heyman commented that the end battle was removed to "(avoid) repetition" with the forthcoming adaptation of Deathly Hallows. The funeral was removed as it was believed it did not fit with the rest of the film.[65] The collapse of a Muggle bridge mentioned briefly in the book serves as the film's opening sequence.[66] Scenes of Diagon Alley being demolished by Death Eaters and an attack on the Burrow by Bellatrix Lestrange and werewolf Fenrir Greyback are added, as can be seen in the trailers. All but two of the memory scenes, including that of the Gaunts, have been cut. Only the flashbacks of Tom Riddle at the orphanage and Riddle asking Slughorn about Horcruxes, shown twice, remain.[66] Yates said they made the decision to compress the memories, but still "got some really cool ones".[67] Characters who are cut include the Dursleys, Kreacher, Dobby, Bill and Fleur, Rufus Scrimgeour, Cornelius Fudge and the Muggle Prime Minister. However, Quidditch,[68] being excluded from the previous film, returns. Bellatrix Lestrange will also participate in the battle of the astronomy tower, whereas she did not in the book, as seen in a picture with the Carrows and Greyback, celebrating Dumbledore's death. In the book, on the Hogwarts Express, after he is paralysed and hidden under his Invisibility Cloak by Draco Malfoy, Harry is rescued by Nymphadora Tonks. In the film, Luna Lovegood saves him instead, using her Spectrespecs to find him.[69]

Diablo 3 - DVG#1857
DVG on
«13456712

Posts

  • Options
    sanstodosanstodo Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I saw an unfinished version of this last summer at a screening in Chicago. I am going tonight for the midnight show. The unfinished version was really cool, even if most of the CGI was unfinished/missing. It really gave me an appreciation for how much of the movie is computer generated and how seamlessly it is woven in.

    That said, I was sad that they:
    Cut the battle at Hogwarts. It feels like the Deatheaters come in, Snape kills Dumbledore, then the Deatheaters escape with little struggle, with only Harry trying to stop them. It's a bit weird, since you'd think that it would be incredibly difficult for Deatheaters to leave Hogwarts.

    But overall, I really recommend people see it. The actors have improved dramatically, particularly Draco Malfoy, which is nice to see.

    However, if you haven't read the books or seen the other movies, you're going to be incredibly lost. This is definitely not a stand-alone film.

    sanstodo on
  • Options
    ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    What's the general opinion on the fifth film here? Not having read the books past Prisoner of Azkaban, I liked Yates' Order of the Phoenix second best, right after Azkaban. A friend of mine who's read the books hated the fifth film, though, for the things it changed.

    Thirith on
    webp-net-resizeimage.jpg
    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • Options
    RohanRohan Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Have tickets booked for tomorrow, and looking forward to it. I loved the Order of the Phoenix film, too.

    Rohan on
    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
  • Options
    RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Thirith wrote: »
    What's the general opinion on the fifth film here? Not having read the books past Prisoner of Azkaban, I liked Yates' Order of the Phoenix second best, right after Azkaban. A friend of mine who's read the books hated the fifth film, though, for the things it changed.

    I've only seen it once, but it seemed strangely flat. Like 2 hours of exposition and then BAM the end.

    RUNN1NGMAN on
  • Options
    DVGDVG No. 1 Honor Student Nether Institute, Evil AcademyRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Personally I thought the fifth film was bangin'. I had qualms with all the other movies in some way or another, but the fifth film captured everything important perfectly.

    DVG on
    Diablo 3 - DVG#1857
  • Options
    wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    DVG wrote: »
    The Boy Who Lived Returns to the Big Screen Tonight at midnight.

    The film currently holds a rare 98% on RT, based on 41 reviews.

    Differences from the book, to get it out of the way:
    There are a number of changes from the book in the film. Much of the book's ending has been changed, with the climactic battle and Dumbledore's funeral being removed. Heyman commented that the end battle was removed to "(avoid) repetition" with the forthcoming adaptation of Deathly Hallows. The funeral was removed as it was believed it did not fit with the rest of the film.[65] The collapse of a Muggle bridge mentioned briefly in the book serves as the film's opening sequence.[66] Scenes of Diagon Alley being demolished by Death Eaters and an attack on the Burrow by Bellatrix Lestrange and werewolf Fenrir Greyback are added, as can be seen in the trailers. All but two of the memory scenes, including that of the Gaunts, have been cut. Only the flashbacks of Tom Riddle at the orphanage and Riddle asking Slughorn about Horcruxes, shown twice, remain.[66] Yates said they made the decision to compress the memories, but still "got some really cool ones".[67] Characters who are cut include the Dursleys, Kreacher, Dobby, Bill and Fleur, Rufus Scrimgeour, Cornelius Fudge and the Muggle Prime Minister. However, Quidditch,[68] being excluded from the previous film, returns. Bellatrix Lestrange will also participate in the battle of the astronomy tower, whereas she did not in the book, as seen in a picture with the Carrows and Greyback, celebrating Dumbledore's death. In the book, on the Hogwarts Express, after he is paralysed and hidden under his Invisibility Cloak by Draco Malfoy, Harry is rescued by Nymphadora Tonks. In the film, Luna Lovegood saves him instead, using her Spectrespecs to find him.[69]

    Ok, I must be the only person that wanted to see Harry tell Scrimgeour to fuck off.

    wwtMask on
    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • Options
    ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited July 2009
    I can live with all of those changes.

    I'm stoked about this; don't know when I'll see it, though.

    ElJeffe on
    I submitted an entry to Lego Ideas, and if 10,000 people support me, it'll be turned into an actual Lego set!If you'd like to see and support my submission, follow this link.
  • Options
    darthmixdarthmix Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I just watched OotP for the second time last week, and I felt the same way I did when I saw it in the theater: it's an entirely worthy entry in the film series. It wasn't quite as climactic as it could have been, but it worked fine as a chapter in the continuing story; the worst thing that can be said about it is that it definitely wouldn't work as a stand-alone movie. You have to be a fan to get into it.

    So excited for this one. Looking forward to lots of dark premonitions and foreshadowing juxtaposed with wacky teen-hormone hijinx.

    darthmix on
  • Options
    Mx. QuillMx. Quill I now prefer "Myr. Quill", actually... {They/Them}Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    As I briefly mentioned in the Movie Awareness thread, I got to see it yesterday night. It's one of the perks to working at a movie theatre. As a fan of the books who has lost faith in the movies around the time of the third or fourth, I felt that Half-Blood Prince was well done.

    It goes without saying, really; here there be spoilers.
    For one, Dumbledore does not act like a grumpy old man like he did in Goblet of Fire and Order of the Phoenix. Gambon finally decided to play his part as the caring teacher that Richard Harris started. Never did like how he violently shook Harry in GoF, so his change in style is welcomed. I also enjoyed that they were able to make the relationship stuff humorous, rather than the seriousness that it has been in other films like Transformers 2. There's quite a few funny scenes of Lavender acting stupidly around Ron, but nothing is terribly sappy. The added scene of Bellatrix and Greyback attacking the Burrow wasn't entirely necessary, but since it only lasted five minutes, there's not a whole lot that could have replaced it. It was, however, a tad disappointing that they didn't even mention the other three Horcruxes outside of the locket, the ring, and the diary. How else would they know to search for the cup, the diadem, and Nagini? It would just be left up to guess, really.

    All in all, it's probably my third favorite of the movies; the first two are still better, due largely in part to the shortness of their book iterations. At least Deathly Hallows is a split movie, so they hopefully won't leave out too much of the important stuff since they have a whole five hours.

    Mx. Quill on
  • Options
    cloudeaglecloudeagle Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I don't mind the changes much at all... hell, I felt the first two movies suffered a bit by being too literal to the book.

    I'm actually hoping for more changes in the adaptation of the last book, especially since Harry spends half of it moping in a tent.

    cloudeagle on
    Switch: 3947-4890-9293
  • Options
    KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Man, each of the recent Potter flicks has like one scene that I want to see. Last one it was the Voldemort/Dumbledore duel (though I heard that was disappointing); this time it's the Snape/Harry "Fight back, you coward!" showdown.

    KalTorak on
  • Options
    Mx. QuillMx. Quill I now prefer "Myr. Quill", actually... {They/Them}Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Oh, also, a thought concerning the added scene:
    If Bellatrix and Greyback could breach a location no doubt protected by powerful magic evoked by Dumbeldore to protect Harry in this movie, then how is it that Voldemort cannot penetrate the defenses cast around Tonk's house at the beginning of the seventh book? You gotta figure that any magic the rest of the Order can cast would pale in comparison to Dumbledore's, seeing as he beat the previous wielder of the Elder Wand and is the only one that Voldemort would not willingly fight. Seems a bit odd, especially if that scene does make it into the film adaptation of Deathly Hallows.

    Mx. Quill on
  • Options
    DVGDVG No. 1 Honor Student Nether Institute, Evil AcademyRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    You heard wrong. The Voldemort Dumbledor fight is awesome, it just not a literal interpretation.

    DVG on
    Diablo 3 - DVG#1857
  • Options
    KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    OK cool maybe I'll rustle it up on Netflix then.

    KalTorak on
  • Options
    Smug DucklingSmug Duckling Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    RUNN1NGMAN wrote: »
    Thirith wrote: »
    What's the general opinion on the fifth film here? Not having read the books past Prisoner of Azkaban, I liked Yates' Order of the Phoenix second best, right after Azkaban. A friend of mine who's read the books hated the fifth film, though, for the things it changed.

    I've only seen it once, but it seemed strangely flat. Like 2 hours of exposition and then BAM the end.

    That's basically what the book is like, so I guess they succeeded.

    Number 5 was easily the worst book in the series imho.

    EDIT: Going to a midnight screening tonight.

    Smug Duckling on
    smugduckling,pc,days.png
  • Options
    wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Number 5 was easily the worst book in the series imho.

    There is nothing correct about this statement.

    wwtMask on
    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • Options
    KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    wwtMask wrote: »
    Number 5 was easily the worst book in the series imho.

    There is nothing correct about this statement.

    well, the "imho" part is probably correct.

    KalTorak on
  • Options
    darthmixdarthmix Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    wwtMask wrote: »
    Number 5 was easily the worst book in the series imho.

    There is nothing correct about this statement.
    You're asserting that it's not actually his opinion? That's novel. EDIT: Beat'd

    darthmix on
  • Options
    wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    KalTorak wrote: »
    wwtMask wrote: »
    Number 5 was easily the worst book in the series imho.

    There is nothing correct about this statement.

    well, the "imho" part is probably correct.

    No, the rest of the statement was so wrong that even that qualifier is wrong.

    wwtMask on
    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • Options
    SirUltimosSirUltimos Don't talk, Rusty. Just paint. Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    This was my favourite book, so I think I may have to see this. Although I doubt anyone will go with me, so I might have to drag my best friend's girlfriend to the theatre with me to see it.

    I just hope it's better than OotP. I saw the movie before I read the book, so I was completely lost. But I've read Half-Blood Prince, so this should hopefully be easier to follow.

    SirUltimos on
  • Options
    tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    The first book/movie were the worst in each. Though the 4th movie is pretty ragged just because there was too much to stuff in there; it's like ACTION SETPIECE...pause... ACTION SETPIECE, etc.

    Azkaban is the best movie hands-down.

    tsmvengy on
    steam_sig.png
  • Options
    SpectreSpectre Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I hated the last movie(Order of the Phoenix?) for some reason, but the other HP movies have been pretty enjoyable though never amazing. Still, I'm going to see this one tonight, hoping that it will be great. Hopefully now that I barely remember the books, I won't think about all the times when the movie splits away from the book.

    As for the Deathly Hallows, it's great that they're splitting it. Some books are best split into multiple parts when translated to film. The Hobbit is being made into two movies as well, i think.

    Spectre on
    gst+spectre.png
  • Options
    deadonthestreetdeadonthestreet Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I may see this in the theater. I haven't been a fan of the previous movies, but this is getting really good reviews and sounds like a step up. On the other hand, it is maybe my least favorite book in the series, so I don't know.

    deadonthestreet on
  • Options
    jeddy leejeddy lee Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Looking forward to this greatly. Loved the movies but never read the books, then OotP came out, saw it in the theaters and was pissed that I was left at that cliffhanger, so I went and picked up all the books and read them in like 3 months. (that is a LOT of reading for me)

    jeddy lee on
    Backlog Challenge: 0%
    0/8

    PS2
    FF X replay

    PS3
    God of War 1&2 HD
    Rachet and Clank Future
    MGS 4
    Prince of Persia

    360
    Bayonetta
    Fable 3

    DS
    FF: 4 heroes of light
  • Options
    ShaggyShaggy Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I was a bit disappointed with the fifth movie as well. The book might be my favorite, because I like the sense of dread or desperation it builds as Hogwarts is slowly taken over. I didn't feel like the movie captured this. I was also disappointed they left out
    Harry searching for ways to bring back Sirius at the end

    I'm glad to hear that the new one is getting good reviews because I honestly wasn't too excited for it after the fifth movie.

    Shaggy on
  • Options
    mrdobalinamrdobalina Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Am I the only one bored to tears by these movies?

    I read all the books as they came out, but the movies are just so...flat.

    My wife was actually making plans to see this (because she thought I wanted to) and I had to tell her I have absolutely zero interest in paying money to see these boring movies anymore.

    Maybe I am the only one.

    And yes wwt, the fifth book was the worst of the series.

    The sixth was the best though.

    mrdobalina on
  • Options
    KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I've only seen the first four, but I agree- the movies are basically highlights of cool-looking scenes from the books. Then they nail the plot together with lines in the transitional scenes.

    KalTorak on
  • Options
    RohanRohan Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    DVG wrote: »
    You heard wrong. The Voldemort Dumbledor fight is awesome, it just not a literal interpretation.

    Agreed, it was one of the highlights of the film for me. I remember everyone comparing it to Gandalf Vs. Saruman in the LOTR films (though they're different types of fights altogether) and saying, "Now that's a wizard's duel!"

    Really looking forward to tomorrow.

    Rohan on
    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
  • Options
    HorusHorus Los AngelesRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    sucks imax wont happen till end of the month.

    Horus on
    “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go...”
    ― Dr. Seuss, Oh, the Places You'll Go!
  • Options
    AsiinaAsiina ... WaterlooRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    mrdobalina wrote: »
    Am I the only one bored to tears by these movies?

    I read all the books as they came out, but the movies are just so...flat.

    My wife was actually making plans to see this (because she thought I wanted to) and I had to tell her I have absolutely zero interest in paying money to see these boring movies anymore.

    Maybe I am the only one.

    And yes wwt, the fifth book was the worst of the series.

    The sixth was the best though.

    I hate the movies. All the little changes really grate on me and I just find the whole experience so uninteresting.

    Although I disagree about the books. I liked the fifth one a lot despite being ALL ANGST, ALL THE TIME since I mean, dude had a right to be angsty.

    The sixth one is a lot better as a first part to the seventh, but the first time I read it the day it came out I was very unimpressed. It basically amounts to:

    spoilers for Half Blood Prince
    Harry being all HEY GUYS MALFOY IS TOTALLY UP TO SOMETHING EVIL and Ron and Hermione being all "shut the fuck up, Harry" and Hermione being all HEY GUYS THAT POTIONS BOOK IS TOTALLY EVIL and Ron and Harry being all "shut the fuck up, Hermione" for a year. Like three friends having the same two arguments for an entire year. It just seemed so absurd. At least half the conversations that amounted to that could have been cut and the book would have been a lot better with a much tighter story.

    Asiina on
  • Options
    QinguQingu Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Rohan wrote: »
    DVG wrote: »
    You heard wrong. The Voldemort Dumbledor fight is awesome, it just not a literal interpretation.

    Agreed, it was one of the highlights of the film for me. I remember everyone comparing it to Gandalf Vs. Saruman in the LOTR films (though they're different types of fights altogether) and saying, "Now that's a wizard's duel!"

    Really looking forward to tomorrow.

    The movie fight was indeed awesome.

    But it would have been awesomer if it was more true to the book.

    I don't generally care about movies being true to the book; I'm totally fine with cutting things and changing things around to make them more cinematic. But the action as Rowling describes in the book's duel would have been a lot cooler to see than the action in the actual movie.

    At the very least, they should have been teleporting around like wizrobes.

    Qingu on
  • Options
    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    mrdobalina wrote: »
    Am I the only one bored to tears by these movies?

    I read all the books as they came out, but the movies are just so...flat.

    My wife was actually making plans to see this (because she thought I wanted to) and I had to tell her I have absolutely zero interest in paying money to see these boring movies anymore.

    Maybe I am the only one.

    And yes wwt, the fifth book was the worst of the series.

    The sixth was the best though.

    I'm in the same boat, but that probably stems from me not liking the actual books much. Let's go hang out somewhere else! We can have a clubhouse with blackjack! ....eh, you know the rest.

    Fencingsax on
  • Options
    ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    tsmvengy wrote: »
    The first book/movie were the worst in each. Though the 4th movie is pretty ragged just because there was too much to stuff in there; it's like ACTION SETPIECE...pause... ACTION SETPIECE, etc.
    My girlfriend and I recently re-watched the first film, and while I thought it was okay when I saw it at the cinema I found it pretty painful this time. Yes, it's got some nice set design, but it's just so childish (which the best children's books/films never are) and pedestrian. One of the reasons why I liked Azkaban so much was because there was an actual director at the helm.

    I agree about the fourth film; to a large extent it felt like a computer game narrative, going from Cool Level to Cool Level without much in the way of Spannungsbogen (I'm afraid there simply is no adequate English equivalent). However, I think it handles everything from the final trial/hedge maze very well - at that point it actually has urgency and seems to be about *something* rather than just setpieces.

    Thirith on
    webp-net-resizeimage.jpg
    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • Options
    jclastjclast Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Thirith wrote: »
    tsmvengy wrote: »
    The first book/movie were the worst in each. Though the 4th movie is pretty ragged just because there was too much to stuff in there; it's like ACTION SETPIECE...pause... ACTION SETPIECE, etc.
    My girlfriend and I recently re-watched the first film, and while I thought it was okay when I saw it at the cinema I found it pretty painful this time. Yes, it's got some nice set design, but it's just so childish (which the best children's books/films never are) and pedestrian. One of the reasons why I liked Azkaban so much was because there was an actual director at the helm.

    I agree about the fourth film; to a large extent it felt like a computer game narrative, going from Cool Level to Cool Level without much in the way of Spannungsbogen (I'm afraid there simply is no adequate English equivalent). However, I think it handles everything from the final trial/hedge maze very well - at that point it actually has urgency and seems to be about *something* rather than just setpieces.

    Babelfish claims that Spannungsbogen means tension sheet, but I'm assuming you just meant that the whole thing (until the end) felt unimportant or lazy?

    jclast on
    camo_sig2.png
  • Options
    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    jclast wrote: »
    Thirith wrote: »
    tsmvengy wrote: »
    The first book/movie were the worst in each. Though the 4th movie is pretty ragged just because there was too much to stuff in there; it's like ACTION SETPIECE...pause... ACTION SETPIECE, etc.
    My girlfriend and I recently re-watched the first film, and while I thought it was okay when I saw it at the cinema I found it pretty painful this time. Yes, it's got some nice set design, but it's just so childish (which the best children's books/films never are) and pedestrian. One of the reasons why I liked Azkaban so much was because there was an actual director at the helm.

    I agree about the fourth film; to a large extent it felt like a computer game narrative, going from Cool Level to Cool Level without much in the way of Spannungsbogen (I'm afraid there simply is no adequate English equivalent). However, I think it handles everything from the final trial/hedge maze very well - at that point it actually has urgency and seems to be about *something* rather than just setpieces.

    Babelfish claims that Spannungsbogen means tension sheet, but I'm assuming you just meant that the whole thing (until the end) felt unimportant or lazy?
    What, the bits of packing paper painted red with Tension Sheet written across them in big letters?

    Fencingsax on
  • Options
    tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    jclast wrote: »
    Thirith wrote: »
    tsmvengy wrote: »
    The first book/movie were the worst in each. Though the 4th movie is pretty ragged just because there was too much to stuff in there; it's like ACTION SETPIECE...pause... ACTION SETPIECE, etc.
    My girlfriend and I recently re-watched the first film, and while I thought it was okay when I saw it at the cinema I found it pretty painful this time. Yes, it's got some nice set design, but it's just so childish (which the best children's books/films never are) and pedestrian. One of the reasons why I liked Azkaban so much was because there was an actual director at the helm.

    I agree about the fourth film; to a large extent it felt like a computer game narrative, going from Cool Level to Cool Level without much in the way of Spannungsbogen (I'm afraid there simply is no adequate English equivalent). However, I think it handles everything from the final trial/hedge maze very well - at that point it actually has urgency and seems to be about *something* rather than just setpieces.

    Babelfish claims that Spannungsbogen means tension sheet, but I'm assuming you just meant that the whole thing (until the end) felt unimportant or lazy?

    That word means plot or character development. Entirely lacking until the end of the film.

    But yeah the first and second movies are definitely really boring and pedestrian.

    tsmvengy on
    steam_sig.png
  • Options
    ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Quick P.S.: A literal translation of Spannungsbogen would be 'arc of tension'. You could describe it as the build-up of the plot, usually with the Spannung, the tension, getting stronger and stronger until it reaches a climax. Everything that happens in an epilogue tends not to fall under Spannungsbogen any more.

    Plot and character development both add to the Spannungsbogen, although you also get formal elements such as editing adding to it.

    (I guess that 'tension sheet' translation comes from Bogen also meaning 'sheet or ream of paper'. It also means bow, as in bow-and-arrow or rainbow.)

    Goblet of Fire (film, not book) didn't ratchet up the tension at all until the last half hour or so. The trials were all interchangeable, and once Harry had passed one it was essentially meaningless. The film never once convinced me until the last trial that something was really at stake.

    Thirith on
    webp-net-resizeimage.jpg
    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • Options
    RocketSauceRocketSauce Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Most of the Potter films just tread water and attempt to stay afloat and bring in the requisite amount of cash to pay for the next one. I thought the 3rd one had some creative balls to it.

    RocketSauce on
  • Options
    DVGDVG No. 1 Honor Student Nether Institute, Evil AcademyRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Qingu wrote: »
    Rohan wrote: »
    DVG wrote: »
    You heard wrong. The Voldemort Dumbledor fight is awesome, it just not a literal interpretation.

    Agreed, it was one of the highlights of the film for me. I remember everyone comparing it to Gandalf Vs. Saruman in the LOTR films (though they're different types of fights altogether) and saying, "Now that's a wizard's duel!"

    Really looking forward to tomorrow.

    The movie fight was indeed awesome.

    But it would have been awesomer if it was more true to the book.

    I don't generally care about movies being true to the book; I'm totally fine with cutting things and changing things around to make them more cinematic. But the action as Rowling describes in the book's duel would have been a lot cooler to see than the action in the actual movie.

    At the very least, they should have been teleporting around like wizrobes.

    For me, the movie version is the superior edition of the fight.

    Compare/Contast?
    Book Version
    • Voldemort attempts to AK Harry, Dumbeldore uses a statue to Block the spell.
    • Dumbledore brings the rest of the statues to life, using them to pin Beletrix and otherwise act as shields.
    • Dumbledore sends a forceful spell at Voldemort, who conjures a shield to block it.
    • Dumbeldore and Voldemort banter about Life and Death
    • Dumbledore conjurs a fire whip to wrap up Voldemort, who turns it into a flame snake, which Dumbledore dispells
    • Fawkes takes a AK aimed a Dumbledore's Back
    • Dumbeldore wraps Voldemort in a Water Cocoon attempting to suffocate him.
    • Voldemort escapes the water spell and attempts to possess Harry.
    • Voldemort goes "He knows love! I am defeated, BLARG!" and disapparates with Bellatrix after being seen by the Ministry of Magic workers.

    Movie Version
    • Dumbeldore and Voldemort open with a "connected wand" struggle, sparks coming off of them break great chunks out of the wall around them. Bellatrix escapes via the Floo Network.
    • Voldemort draws the magic fromt he connected wands and conjures a GIANT FUCKING FLAME SNAKE, laughing at how screwed Dumbledore is. Dumbeldore swipes his wand like a sword, killing the snake and causing it to explode outward. Voldemort recovers and dissipates the flames.
    • Dumbeldore surrounds Voldemort with the Water Cocoon, struggling to keep the cocoon whole while Voldemort tries to get out.
    • Harry thinks the battle is over, and Dumbeldore knocks him straight back on his ass.
    • Voldemort breaks free of the Cocoon, and sends a miasma of dark energy flying at Dumbledore and Harry, Dumbledore managing to block it with a Shield Charm
    • Voldemort draws the Dark Energy back in, and releases it in a huge force pulse that both actually knocks Dumbledore on his ass and shatters hundreds and hundreds of windows in the huge Ministry of Magic Atrium, slicing the shit out of the Cornelius Fudge banner in the process, and proceeds to send the shards of glass flying at Harry and Dumbledore, triumph on his face.
    • Dumbledore conjures a magic barrier, causes the glass that passes through it to turn into harmless white sand.
    • Voldemort attempts to possess Harry (this, I think, is the difference that makes the movie superior), and forces him to relieve every bad experience from the run of the movies: The Death of Sirius, his parents, the dementors, Cedric's Death, his own worries about being like Voldemort, and all the lonliness and anger that's plagued him the entire year.
    • Dumbeldore attempts to remind Harry of the things that make him different from Voldemort, and Harry begins to fade, feeling defeated.
    • Ron, Hermione, Ginny, Luna and Neville arrive in the Atrium returning from below, and Harry is able to push through Voldemort's control, remembering the good times spent with his friends, seeing his parents in the mirror of Erised, Hugging Sirius and most of all laughing along with Ron and Hermione, managing to throw off Voldemort's attempts to control him by his actual will, not just because of his passive ability to love.
    • Voldemort talks some smack and disapparates after Fudge and the other Ministy workers see him.

    DVG on
    Diablo 3 - DVG#1857
  • Options
    RohanRohan Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    DVG wrote: »
    Qingu wrote: »
    Rohan wrote: »
    DVG wrote: »
    You heard wrong. The Voldemort Dumbledor fight is awesome, it just not a literal interpretation.

    Agreed, it was one of the highlights of the film for me. I remember everyone comparing it to Gandalf Vs. Saruman in the LOTR films (though they're different types of fights altogether) and saying, "Now that's a wizard's duel!"

    Really looking forward to tomorrow.

    The movie fight was indeed awesome.

    But it would have been awesomer if it was more true to the book.

    I don't generally care about movies being true to the book; I'm totally fine with cutting things and changing things around to make them more cinematic. But the action as Rowling describes in the book's duel would have been a lot cooler to see than the action in the actual movie.

    At the very least, they should have been teleporting around like wizrobes.

    For me, the movie version is the superior edition of the fight.

    Compare/Contast?
    Book Version
    • Voldemort attempts to AK Harry, Dumbeldore uses a statue to Block the spell.
    • Dumbledore brings the rest of the statues to life, using them to pin Beletrix and otherwise act as shields.
    • Dumbledore sends a forceful spell at Voldemort, who conjures a shield to block it.
    • Dumbeldore and Voldemort banter about Life and Death
    • Dumbledore conjurs a fire whip to wrap up Voldemort, who turns it into a flame snake, which Dumbledore dispells
    • Fawkes takes a AK aimed a Dumbledore's Back
    • Dumbeldore wraps Voldemort in a Water Cocoon attempting to suffocate him.
    • Voldemort escapes the water spell and attempts to possess Harry.
    • Voldemort goes "He knows love! I am defeated, BLARG!" and disapparates with Bellatrix after being seen by the Ministry of Magic workers.

    Movie Version
    • Dumbeldore and Voldemort open with a "connected wand" struggle, sparks coming off of them break great chunks out of the wall around them. Bellatrix escapes via the Floo Network.
    • Voldemort draws the magic fromt he connected wands and conjures a GIANT FUCKING FLAME SNAKE, laughing at how screwed Dumbledore is. Dumbeldore swipes his wand like a sword, killing the snake and causing it to explode outward. Voldemort recovers and dissipates the flames.
    • Dumbeldore surrounds Voldemort with the Water Cocoon, struggling to keep the cocoon whole while Voldemort tries to get out.
    • Harry thinks the battle is over, and Dumbeldore knocks him straight back on his ass.
    • Voldemort breaks free of the Cocoon, and sends a miasma of dark energy flying at Dumbledore and Harry, Dumbledore managing to block it with a Shield Charm
    • Voldemort draws the Dark Energy back in, and releases it in a huge force pulse that both actually knocks Dumbledore on his ass and shatters hundreds and hundreds of windows in the huge Ministry of Magic Atrium, slicing the shit out of the Cornelius Fudge banner in the process, and proceeds to send the shards of glass flying at Harry and Dumbledore, triumph on his face.
    • Dumbledore conjures a magic barrier, causes the glass that passes through it to turn into harmless white sand.
    • Voldemort attempts to possess Harry (this, I think, is the difference that makes the movie superior), and forces him to relieve every bad experience from the run of the movies: The Death of Sirius, his parents, the dementors, Cedric's Death, his own worries about being like Voldemort, and all the lonliness and anger that's plagued him the entire year.
    • Dumbeldore attempts to remind Harry of the things that make him different from Voldemort, and Harry begins to fade, feeling defeated.
    • Ron, Hermione, Ginny, Luna and Neville arrive in the Atrium returning from below, and Harry is able to push through Voldemort's control, remembering the good times spent with his friends, seeing his parents in the mirror of Erised, Hugging Sirius and most of all laughing along with Ron and Hermione, managing to throw off Voldemort's attempts to control him by his actual will, not just because of his passive ability to love.
    • Voldemort talks some smack and disapparates after Fudge and the other Ministy workers see him.

    I thought it was a shame that we didn't get to see the statues come to life, but yes, I thought the duel in the film was very well done and more exciting than the version in the book.

    Rohan on
    ...and I thought of how all those people died, and what a good death that is. That nobody can blame you for it, because everyone else died along with you, and it is the fault of none, save those who did the killing.

    Nothing's forgotten, nothing is ever forgotten
Sign In or Register to comment.