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Racial Profiling or Rightful Investigation?

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    BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Sheep wrote: »
    The idea that this only happened because the guy was black is hilarious. You better believe if my scrubby, long haired, hippie bearded ass was in the exact same situation, and I had the exact same response as the Professor, my ass would have ended up in jail as well.

    And I probably wouldn't get the benefit of having the charges dropped because of my race.
    I'd say this calls for experimental verification!

    Bama on
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    SheepSheep Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited July 2009
    Bama wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    The idea that this only happened because the guy was black is hilarious. You better believe if my scrubby, long haired, hippie bearded ass was in the exact same situation, and I had the exact same response as the Professor, my ass would have ended up in jail as well.

    And I probably wouldn't get the benefit of having the charges dropped because of my race.
    I'd say this calls for experimental verification!

    You don't need to experiment. It's happened.

    Sheep on
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    BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Sheep wrote: »
    What, so all black writers and activists are Al Sharpton?

    Alright.

    Why would black writers and black activists accuse themselves of race baiting?
    Why are you assuming that "black writers and black activists" are a homogeneous group?
    The only people concerned about race are Black.
    what?

    Bama on
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    BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Sheep wrote: »
    Bama wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    The idea that this only happened because the guy was black is hilarious. You better believe if my scrubby, long haired, hippie bearded ass was in the exact same situation, and I had the exact same response as the Professor, my ass would have ended up in jail as well.

    And I probably wouldn't get the benefit of having the charges dropped because of my race.
    I'd say this calls for experimental verification!

    You don't need to experiment. It's happened.
    cite? :P

    You said "would." Why didn't you say "did?"

    Bama on
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    PantsBPantsB Fake Thomas Jefferson Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    MrMister wrote: »
    DaMoonRulz wrote: »
    I don't think this was an incident where races collided, I think it was an incident where egos collided. "I'm a citizen, I don't have to take this legally improper mistreatment" vs. "I'm a petty authoritarian, I don't have to take this bad attitude"

    Fixed.

    And the notion that it's acceptable for cops to arrest someone on charges they know won't go anywhere, just as a way to slap cuffs on them and show them the station for the night, is abhorrent.

    Except the legally improper treatment came after he went all "I don't have to take this!" The cop was absolutely doing his job until he decided to be a big man and arrest Gates. Not investigation and not requiring an ID that demonstrated the guy who just broke into a house lived there would not only not have been right but it would have been negligent. Gates is a Very Important Person who was tired and started swinging his dick around. Cops are professional dick swingers and arrested the guy on an open to interpretation charge that would never stick.

    PantsB on
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    SheepSheep Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited July 2009
    Why are you assuming that "black writers and black activists" are a homogeneous group?

    I don't.

    He asked me why black writers and activists aren't saying Race Baiting, and I asked why would they?
    what?

    In this situation, the only people that seem to be concerned about race is the man who was arrested and those that benefit from the incident.


    You said "would." Why didn't you say "did?"

    I haven't moved to Cambridge lately. :D

    EDIT

    But also as mentioned last page where my dad and I were stopped when taking things out of his warehouse on a Sunday. You better believe that if me and him started getting pissy with the cop there's a chance he would have thrown us in the paddy wagon.

    Sheep on
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    ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Selner wrote: »
    And more fuel for this fire, provided by Obama (press conf last night).

    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=8153681&page=1

    And also, the cop who arrested Gates is not apologizing (also in article, as video).

    Hooray for the American President getting involved and stirring up the race debate.

    FFS.

    Chanus on
    Allegedly a voice of reason.
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    BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Sheep wrote: »
    Why are you assuming that "black writers and black activists" are a homogeneous group?

    I don't.

    He asked me why black writers and activists aren't saying Race Baiting, and I asked why would they?
    If this was race baiting on the part of Gates or his representation, wouldn't that be a good reason?

    Bama on
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    cherv1cherv1 Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Sheep wrote: »
    What, so all black writers and activists are Al Sharpton?
    Alright.

    Why would black writers and black activists accuse themselves of race baiting?

    Not themselves, don't be ridiculous, they haven't even accused radical blacktivist violent thug and race-baiter Professor Gates of "playing the race card". This is a thing that white people say to silence black people's criticism and experiences.
    There's severe doubt as to whether the cop was doing his job. You just don't seem to be able to see this through a black perspective, because when you deal with the police they're obviously not going to be racist towards you.
    Let's see.

    Someone reported a B&E. Cop showed up. Cop inspected home, asked for ID. Resident began yelling at a cop. Cop arrested resident.

    Seems like he did his job to me.

    Well you forgot the part where Gates gave him an ID, the cop refused to leave, refused to reveal his identity number, had backup waiting outside and handcuffed him when Gates told him to leave, after which he started shouting. But that really is neither here nor there.
    Hell, even the president has said the police were out of line and that racism was involved in this arrest. Or is he just playing the race card?
    No.

    Obama's just an idiot.

    Oh good one!! This is what I mean about silencing black people's views and experiences though.
    And that's to say nothing of your assertion that discrimination and racism are somehow "in the past".
    Right.

    Because a white cop obviously can't handle a situation involving a black man without racism being involved.

    But I appreciate you accusing me of saying something that I didn't actually say. You're really approaching the discussion in a neutral fashion.


    The only people concerned about race are Black. Why is it impossible for you to see this situation an any light other than "Cop wanted to cuff blackie"?

    Black people are the only ones concerned about race? Hmm really?? It's a good thing white people are so post-racial and color-blind that they don't have to worry about silly wee issues like racism, it's just those blacks who keep whining about that.

    cherv1 on
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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    PantsB wrote: »
    MrMister wrote: »
    DaMoonRulz wrote: »
    I don't think this was an incident where races collided, I think it was an incident where egos collided. "I'm a citizen, I don't have to take this legally improper mistreatment" vs. "I'm a petty authoritarian, I don't have to take this bad attitude"

    Fixed.

    And the notion that it's acceptable for cops to arrest someone on charges they know won't go anywhere, just as a way to slap cuffs on them and show them the station for the night, is abhorrent.

    Except the legally improper treatment came after he went all "I don't have to take this!" The cop was absolutely doing his job until he decided to be a big man and arrest Gates. Not investigation and not requiring an ID that demonstrated the guy who just broke into a house lived there would not only not have been right but it would have been negligent. Gates is a Very Important Person who was tired and started swinging his dick around. Cops are professional dick swingers and arrested the guy on an open to interpretation charge that would never stick.
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.

    Also Chanus, are you seriously suggesting that there were no racial issues before this with the President?

    Fencingsax on
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    cherv1cherv1 Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Sheep wrote: »
    Why are you assuming that "black writers and black activists" are a homogeneous group?
    I don't.

    He asked me why black writers and activists aren't saying Race Baiting, and I asked why would they?
    what?
    In this situation, the only people that seem to be concerned about race is the man who was arrested and those that benefit from the incident.

    That's strange because I had assumed that no-one "benefits" from institutional racism (well, save for white people), and that any "benefit" that came from drawing attention to the issue would only serve to give black people more equal treatment than at present.
    Chanus wrote: »
    Selner wrote: »
    And more fuel for this fire, provided by Obama (press conf last night).

    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=8153681&page=1

    And also, the cop who arrested Gates is not apologizing (also in article, as video).

    Hooray for the American President getting involved and stirring up the race debate.

    FFS.

    Is this a bad thing somehow?

    cherv1 on
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    SheepSheep Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited July 2009
    Not themselves, don't be ridiculous, they haven't even accused radical blacktivist violent thug and race-baiter Professor Gates of "playing the race card". This is a thing that white people say to silence black people's criticism and experiences.

    Often times? Yes.

    This time? No.
    Well you forgot the part where Gates gave him an ID, the cop refused to leave, refused to reveal his identity number, had backup waiting outside and handcuffed him when Gates told him to leave, after which he started shouting. But that really is neither here nor there.

    That's not the rundown that's being repeated.
    Oh good one!! This is what I mean about silencing black people's views and experiences though.

    Right. Because it's a completely unfathomable idea that what happened didn't happen because of his race.
    Black people are the only ones concerned about race? Hmm really?? It's a good thing white people are so post-racial and color-blind that they don't have to worry about silly wee issues like racism, it's just those blacks who keep whining about that.

    That's not what I said and I'd appreciate if you stopped that.
    That's strange because I had assumed that no-one "benefits" from institutional racism (well, save for white people), and that any "benefit" that came from drawing attention to the issue would only serve to give black people more equal treatment than at present.

    Huh.

    I wonder who's benefiting from this situation.

    By equal treatment I'm assuming that you believe the cop shouldn't have done his job because the man in question was black.
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.

    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.

    Sheep on
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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Sheep wrote: »
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.
    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.
    That doesn't fucking matter. If a guy is in his home, he has every right to be there, and the cop does not.

    Fencingsax on
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    ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    cherv1 wrote: »
    Chanus wrote: »
    Hooray for the American President getting involved and stirring up the race debate.

    FFS.

    Is this a bad thing somehow?

    Absolutely, it's a bad thing. His comments were completely pointless and unnecessary, and will only be used to further the absolutely ridiculous assertion that race was involved in this case when it clearly was not (except in the case of the "victim" sputtering about it).

    He shouldn't have been asked to comment in the first place, but more importantly, he should have had the dignity and common sense not to respond.

    Chanus on
    Allegedly a voice of reason.
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    ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Also Chanus, are you seriously suggesting that there were no racial issues before this with the President?

    Not at all. I'm suggesting the President should not be involved in this situation.

    Chanus on
    Allegedly a voice of reason.
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    matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.
    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.
    That doesn't fucking matter. If a guy is in his home, he has every right to be there, and the cop does not.
    Up to the point where he has proven that he is in fact who he says he is and is the homeowner, for all intents and purposes he's someone who was seen breaking into a house.

    matt has a problem on
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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Chanus wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Also Chanus, are you seriously suggesting that there were no racial issues before this with the President?

    Not at all. I'm suggesting the President should not be involved in this situation.
    eh, he was asked a question about a friend of his.

    Fencingsax on
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    SheepSheep Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited July 2009
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.
    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.
    That doesn't fucking matter. If a guy is in his home, he has every right to be there, and the cop does not.

    Sure.

    But when you throw in issues of breaking and entering, alarms, etc, then the cop very much has a right to be there and to be suspicious.

    Sheep on
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    ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Chanus wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Also Chanus, are you seriously suggesting that there were no racial issues before this with the President?

    Not at all. I'm suggesting the President should not be involved in this situation.
    eh, he was asked a question about a friend of his.

    He's the fucking President.

    Chanus on
    Allegedly a voice of reason.
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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.
    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.
    That doesn't fucking matter. If a guy is in his home, he has every right to be there, and the cop does not.
    Up to the point where he has proven that he is in fact who he says he is and is the homeowner, for all intents and purposes he's someone who was seen breaking into a house.
    Yeah, but he did that. He showed his ID with the address on it. Then he showed the ID proving he was a Harvard Professor, because it's technically Harvard property. And then the cop wouldn't leave.

    Fencingsax on
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    SpindizzySpindizzy Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    So if the policeman arrested the guy after he started yelling its ok and if he arrested the guy who then started yelling at him, its not?

    I think the proper chain of events is important to work out here. I don't like the idea of a policeman refusing to identify himself though.

    Spindizzy on
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    matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.
    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.
    That doesn't fucking matter. If a guy is in his home, he has every right to be there, and the cop does not.
    Up to the point where he has proven that he is in fact who he says he is and is the homeowner, for all intents and purposes he's someone who was seen breaking into a house.
    Yeah, but he did that. He showed his ID with the address on it. Then he showed the ID proving he was a Harvard Professor, because it's technically Harvard property. And then the cop wouldn't leave.
    The cop did leave though, the interior of the house at least, followed by Gates who continued to berate the cop. I don't think he should have been arrested, but he also should have realized that two men trying to force open a door = really fucking suspicious, and that the cop was doing his job to investigate it. The fact that he race-carded all over the place the second the cop showed up tells me he has a persecution complex and a tenuous grasp on reality.

    matt has a problem on
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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Spindizzy wrote: »
    So if the policeman arrested the guy after he started yelling its ok and if he arrested the guy who then started yelling at him, its not?

    I think the proper chain of events is important to work out here. I don't like the idea of a policeman refusing to identify himself though.
    That would be because it is illegal not to identify yourself by name and badge number if asked.

    Fencingsax on
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    SheepSheep Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited July 2009
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.
    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.
    That doesn't fucking matter. If a guy is in his home, he has every right to be there, and the cop does not.
    Up to the point where he has proven that he is in fact who he says he is and is the homeowner, for all intents and purposes he's someone who was seen breaking into a house.
    Yeah, but he did that. He showed his ID with the address on it. Then he showed the ID proving he was a Harvard Professor, because it's technically Harvard property. And then the cop wouldn't leave.

    From what I've read, the cop stepped inside. Asked for ID. Was refused. Finally convinced Gates to show ID. Gates showed him the ID. Cop said he was investigating a B&E. Gates started yelling at the cop. Cop asked Gates to step outside. Gates continued berating. Gates was arrested.

    Regardless of how the event actually unfolded, both Gates and the Police agree that they stepped outside after identification was shown.

    Sheep on
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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.
    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.
    That doesn't fucking matter. If a guy is in his home, he has every right to be there, and the cop does not.
    Up to the point where he has proven that he is in fact who he says he is and is the homeowner, for all intents and purposes he's someone who was seen breaking into a house.
    Yeah, but he did that. He showed his ID with the address on it. Then he showed the ID proving he was a Harvard Professor, because it's technically Harvard property. And then the cop wouldn't leave.
    The cop did leave though, the interior of the house at least, followed by Gates who continued to berate the cop. I don't think he should have been arrested, but he also should have realized that two men trying to force open a door = really fucking suspicious, and that the cop was doing his job to investigate it. The fact that he race-carded all over the place the second the cop showed up tells me he has a persecution complex and a tenuous grasp on reality.
    Well, according to Gates he followed the cop because he wanted to know his name and badge number.

    Fencingsax on
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    cherv1cherv1 Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.
    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.
    That doesn't fucking matter. If a guy is in his home, he has every right to be there, and the cop does not.
    Up to the point where he has proven that he is in fact who he says he is and is the homeowner, for all intents and purposes he's someone who was seen breaking into a house.
    Yeah, but he did that. He showed his ID with the address on it. Then he showed the ID proving he was a Harvard Professor, because it's technically Harvard property. And then the cop wouldn't leave.
    The cop did leave though, the interior of the house at least, followed by Gates who continued to berate the cop. I don't think he should have been arrested, but he also should have realized that two men trying to force open a door = really fucking suspicious, and that the cop was doing his job to investigate it. The fact that he race-carded all over the place the second the cop showed up tells me he has a persecution complex and a tenuous grasp on reality.

    Really? He has a tenuous grasp on the reality of black people and the police, and the reality of racism? That seems strange, coming from an eminent authority on race relations in America.

    Ta-Nehisi Coates summed it up quite well I thought. He said in Prof Gates's shoes, he would damn well have been angry with the cop too. Or perhaps not, because "my mother taught me how black men are to address the police."

    cherv1 on
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    matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    cherv1 wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.
    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.
    That doesn't fucking matter. If a guy is in his home, he has every right to be there, and the cop does not.
    Up to the point where he has proven that he is in fact who he says he is and is the homeowner, for all intents and purposes he's someone who was seen breaking into a house.
    Yeah, but he did that. He showed his ID with the address on it. Then he showed the ID proving he was a Harvard Professor, because it's technically Harvard property. And then the cop wouldn't leave.
    The cop did leave though, the interior of the house at least, followed by Gates who continued to berate the cop. I don't think he should have been arrested, but he also should have realized that two men trying to force open a door = really fucking suspicious, and that the cop was doing his job to investigate it. The fact that he race-carded all over the place the second the cop showed up tells me he has a persecution complex and a tenuous grasp on reality.

    Really? He has a tenuous grasp on the reality of black people and the police, and the reality of racism? That seems strange, coming from an eminent authority on race relations in America.
    Right, because every white cop is racist, and just can't wait to break out the billy club and fire hoses. They never actually investigate reports of suspicious activity, they just keep the dark people in check. Thus the proper response is to immediately claim racism in every situation.

    matt has a problem on
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    SelnerSelner Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Ta-Nehisi Coates summed it up quite well I thought. He said in Prof Gates's shoes, he would damn well have been angry with the cop too. Or perhaps not, because "my mother taught me how black men are to address the police."

    Maybe it's because I'm white, but I don't understand why anyone gets angry in this situation. I'm actually wanting to blame Gates' reaction on jetlag and being tired. He was in China the previous day.

    Basically, Gates' response to being asked for his ID was "why? because I'm a black man?".

    The cop was responding to a legit B&E call. The B&E call referenced two black men. Therefore, the cop needed to determine the identity of any black man in the house.
    If the B&E call had referenced two white men, or two Latinos or two purple people he would probably not have asked for ID.
    If the B&E call had referenced two white men, and Gates had been white he still would have been asked for his ID.

    Gates jumped to racism before he knew why the cop was there. The cop was doing his job, and nothing he had done at that point was out of line (that came later).

    Selner on
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    SpindizzySpindizzy Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Ok because the same thing happens in the UK - police and other officials are supposed to reveal ID etc. For the cop to not show his number screams suspicious behaviour to me.

    I know this is a pretty shallow argument but if the policeman was just following standard burglary procedures he has every right to be suspicious of the situation, just because his ID states that his address is that building doesn't mean he is currently a resident of that address (he may have been breaking into an ex wifes building or he had just been evicted) I'd rather a cop be slow and polite in the situation rather than he piss off quickly and allow a crime to happen. If the policeman explained the situation and was polite Gates could have waited a few more minutes. Its not like the cop was looking for hidden drugs or something.

    Ofc this relies upon the policeman following procedure and actually explaining himself, though its what I would expect the policeman to do.

    Spindizzy on
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    DerrickDerrick Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    cherv1 wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    Yes, expecting to not be treated as a criminal in his own home was obviously a result of Gates expecting too much. Wait, it feels like I've already written that.
    It's not like the guy was sitting there and enjoying a poptart while catching up on his mail.
    That doesn't fucking matter. If a guy is in his home, he has every right to be there, and the cop does not.
    Up to the point where he has proven that he is in fact who he says he is and is the homeowner, for all intents and purposes he's someone who was seen breaking into a house.
    Yeah, but he did that. He showed his ID with the address on it. Then he showed the ID proving he was a Harvard Professor, because it's technically Harvard property. And then the cop wouldn't leave.
    The cop did leave though, the interior of the house at least, followed by Gates who continued to berate the cop. I don't think he should have been arrested, but he also should have realized that two men trying to force open a door = really fucking suspicious, and that the cop was doing his job to investigate it. The fact that he race-carded all over the place the second the cop showed up tells me he has a persecution complex and a tenuous grasp on reality.

    Really? He has a tenuous grasp on the reality of black people and the police, and the reality of racism? That seems strange, coming from an eminent authority on race relations in America.
    Right, because every white cop is racist, and just can't wait to break out the billy club and fire hoses. They never actually investigate reports of suspicious activity, they just keep the dark people in check. Thus the proper response is to immediately claim racism in every situation.

    In my experience, professors heavily involved in either racism or sexism courses and causes tend to be the MOST likely people to see racism/sexism in EVERYTHING.

    Derrick on
    Steam and CFN: Enexemander
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    cherv1cherv1 Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Derrick wrote: »
    In my experience, professors heavily involved in either racism or sexism courses and causes tend to be the MOST likely people to see racism/sexism in EVERYTHING.

    Yes, because they would have to be uppity negroes / hysterical dames to possibly think that our society is rotten right through with racism and sexism. 8-)

    cherv1 on
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    PeregrineFalconPeregrineFalcon Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    cherv1 wrote: »
    Derrick wrote: »
    In my experience, professors heavily involved in either racism or sexism courses and causes tend to be the MOST likely people to see racism/sexism in EVERYTHING.

    Yes, because they would have to be uppity negroes / hysterical dames to possibly think that our society is rotten right through with racism and sexism. 8-)
    Right, because every white cop is racist, and just can't wait to break out the billy club and fire hoses. They never actually investigate reports of suspicious activity, they just keep the dark people in check. Thus the proper response is to immediately claim racism in every situation.

    PeregrineFalcon on
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    PantsBPantsB Fake Thomas Jefferson Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    cherv1 wrote: »
    Sheep wrote: »
    What, so all black writers and activists are Al Sharpton?
    Alright.

    Why would black writers and black activists accuse themselves of race baiting?

    Not themselves, don't be ridiculous, they haven't even accused radical blacktivist violent thug and race-baiter Professor Gates of "playing the race card". This is a thing that white people say to silence black people's criticism and experiences.
    The first thing to come out of Gates's mouth according to the report was essentially "why? Because I'm a black man in America?" That's playing the race card. Saying the cop was "rogue" and "racist" arrested "the first black man" he saw and arrested him on a "trumped-up charge" just because he was screaming at him things like "This is what happens to black men in America!" (when the officer was already leaving) is playing the race card. Presuming that any time a rich black guy gets arrested by a white cop is an example of racism is playing the race card.
    cherv1 wrote: »
    Well you forgot the part where Gates gave him an ID, the cop refused to leave, refused to reveal his identity number, had backup waiting outside and handcuffed him when Gates told him to leave, after which he started shouting. But that really is neither here nor there.
    If you're just going to argue something that happened in your own imaginary world, why bother cluttering up this thread? Gates began yelling and playing the race card once the cop showed up, and refused to show ID at first. When the officer walked out to radio information to dispatch, Gates followed him and continued to scream at him and call him racist. By now there were people watching, including the passerby who took the picture of Gates after he was cuffed (and who essentially backs the officer's story). This is not simply from the police report but was in front of multiple (eight) witnesses, several of whom news reports have found and they've essentially agreed with the police report and fundamentally disagreed with Gates's version.

    Hell if anything Gates has received preferential treatment after the arrest compared to the average person of any race because the average guy isn't close friends with the Mayor, close friends with the Governor and a friend of the President of the United States.

    This is about dick swinging, not race, except to the point that Gates presumed at any white officer who questioned him must be doing so because he was black


    ed
    Right, because every white cop is racist, and just can't wait to break out the billy club and fire hoses. They never actually investigate reports of suspicious activity, they just keep the dark people in check. Thus the proper response is to immediately claim racism in every situation.

    The funny thing is that of the four cops on the scene, two were white, one was black and one was Hispanic.

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    Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    [ . The fact that he race-carded all over the place the second the cop showed up tells me he has a persecution complex and a tenuous grasp on reality.
    Well, he is a Harvard professor. Persecution complexes and tenuous grasps on reality go with the territory.

    This whole situation was a case of two egos colliding. Gates decided to turn what was a pretty innocuous situation into a drama-fest and the cop decided to show him he needs to respect his authoritah.

    I had something similar happen at my house- my brother-in-law came over to feed our cats while we were on vacation. He forget our security code and set off the alarm. When the cops came, he acted calmly and rationally and they were cool about it. He was able to get me on the phone to get the alarm code to turn off the siren. The cops went on their way without arresting anyone.

    But I suppose he could have thrown a hissy-fit and screamed about how the man was keeping him down.

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    Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    cherv1 wrote: »
    Derrick wrote: »
    In my experience, professors heavily involved in either racism or sexism courses and causes tend to be the MOST likely people to see racism/sexism in EVERYTHING.

    Yes, because they would have to be uppity negroes / hysterical dames to possibly think that our society is rotten right through with racism and sexism. 8-)
    No, you just have to be completely out of touch with reality and contemporary American society and culture.

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    matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Just saw this in an AP article:
    Fellow officers, black and white, say he is well-liked and respected on the force. Crowley was a campus police officer at Brandeis University in July 1993 when he administered CPR trying to save the life of former Boston Celtics player Reggie Lewis. Lewis, who was black, collapsed and died during an off-season workout.

    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_HARVARD_SCHOLAR_DISORDERLY?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2009-07-23-10-18-22

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    YallYall Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Has anyone linked/read the police report? The accounts differ greatly regarding Gates behavior.

    I'm anxious to hear other witnesses describe his actions.

    Yall on
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    ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Do the accounts "differ greatly"? From everything I've heard, Gates doesn't disagree with the account of his behavior, he just simply thinks he was justified in being a douchebag.

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    BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Just saw this in an AP article:
    Fellow officers, black and white, say he is well-liked and respected on the force. Crowley was a campus police officer at Brandeis University in July 1993 when he administered CPR trying to save the life of former Boston Celtics player Reggie Lewis. Lewis, who was black, collapsed and died during an off-season workout.

    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_HARVARD_SCHOLAR_DISORDERLY?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2009-07-23-10-18-22
    See? That proves it.

    If that cop wasn't such a racist, Reggie Lewis would be alive today.


    :P

    Bama on
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    YallYall Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Chanus wrote: »
    Do the accounts "differ greatly"? From everything I've heard, Gates doesn't disagree with the account of his behavior, he just simply thinks he was justified in being a douchebag.

    Greatly in that the officer claims he tried to give Gates his information several times but that Gates was being so loud and obstinate that he wouldn't listen to the officer.

    Then the officer tried to leave and Gates came outside, continued to be disorderly and was warned that he was engaging in disorderly conduct and if he continued to do so that he would be arrested.

    I'm usually first in line to criticize overzealous cops, but by all accounts (from people not named 'Gates') the officer acted appropriately.

    edit: Although cuffing and taking him for a ride downtown may have been a touch excessive...

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