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Working From Home

RichyRichy Registered User regular
edited July 2009 in Debate and/or Discourse
Working from home. I don't mean working alone at the computer naked while drinking Italian salad dressing straight from the bottle... not that I'd ever do that. I mean setting up a home office and having clients/customers over.

I don't like it. I believe my home is a private, personal place. Having friends over is one thing, and having workers over to work on the house is unavoidable, but I draw the line at having random people come in. A man's home is his castle, and the moat and draw bridge are there for a reason dammit.

My girlfriend is the opposite. She has no problem with a home business (both her best friend and one of her cousins have had home businesses for years, with a constant stream of people coming in). She sees the advantages: no commute, no going out in winter, no renting an office, and during the downtime at work she can do house chores.

I'm wondering about the spectrum of opinions on this issue. Am I wrong for wanting to keep people out of my house, or is she weird for wanting to let them in? What do you think, D&D?

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Richy on

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    ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    You both have differing opinions and expectations of your privacy. Neither is weird or strange.

    I personally don't like the idea, but mostly because I don't want an angry customer knowing where I live. ;-)

    Shadowfire on
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    MedopineMedopine __BANNED USERS regular
    edited July 2009
    I would like my personal space to be very much cordoned off from the work space area where people come in

    I think it would depend also on what kind of business it was

    Medopine on
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    KrunkMcGrunkKrunkMcGrunk Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I work at my parents' house. My former home.

    I enjoy it. I can get snacks whenever.

    KrunkMcGrunk on
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    kaz67kaz67 Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I prefer to keep things separate. I like my home to be as stress free as possible and it seems like working at home could make it difficult to maintain that kind of environment.

    kaz67 on
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    electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    kaz67 wrote: »
    I prefer to keep things separate. I like my home to be as stress free as possible and it seems like working at home could make it difficult to maintain that kind of environment.
    I live in a weird world regarding this. I do a lot of things for my Ph D at home because they're ironically easier to do with hosuehold materials then in a lab. But I have found that this makes it a lot less relaxing to be at home.

    electricitylikesme on
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    override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I'd love to work at home. I can pretend customers are little flies and they're getting trapped in my web.

    Edit: There was a picture that was supposed to go here, but my google fu has failed me

    override367 on
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    CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    Well, I work at home a couple of days a week, and I think its pretty awesome. However, I don't meet clients at home. I would not want to do that.

    The advantages of working at home are pretty sweet. No commute time, less money spent on gas, parking, transit fare, eating out, etc. However, there also disadvantages, and you have to be disciplined on keeping your work and personal lives and time separate.

    Corvus on
    :so_raven:
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    SarksusSarksus ATTACK AND DETHRONE GODRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    If I worked from home and had to meet clients I would have to keep my home office and the rest of the house firmly divided. Having said that I don't think I would want to work at home in the first place. I would like to keep work and home very separate. I think I would be less able to relax if I worked at home.

    Sarksus on
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    CokebotleCokebotle 穴掘りの 電車内Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    At first, I thought you meant having a dedicated office for doing work so you could have the rest of your house as your "private time", but having a constant stream of people would irritate the hell out of me. Working at home would be awesome, though.

    Maybe set up a room for your office and then have a door installed leading outside? Got the best of both worlds that way. *shrug*

    Cokebotle on
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    WylderneedshelpWylderneedshelp Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    My wife works from home, however she has a job producing IP for people on a computer. She generally doesn't contact her clients directly, it all happens via email so there is no real invasion of privacy. She gets up when she wants, does as much work as she has access to (or can be bothered to) and then knocks off. Even if we both work an 8 hour day, It takes me several hours longer to do it due to travel time, having to get ready in the morning, lunch breaks etc. Meanwhile she is at home next to a heater in comfy clothes probably with music on and I'm in an inner city concrete box wearing a suit. She gets paid pretty well too.

    Working from home like she does sure looks ideal. If I thought I could get away with having her assassinated so I could disguise myself as her to take over her life and job, I might seriously consider it.

    Her family would probably figure it out eventually though....

    Wylderneedshelp on
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    Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    This is all I have to add.

    If my university time taught me anything, it's that I find it really hard to work in the place that I eat and sleep. When I was in the department, I could get up the motivation, but in my room I would dither about and take ages to start anything. I think if I worked from home, I'd have those same issues unless one room was solely dedicated to work and I could lock myself in somehow.

    Rhesus Positive on
    [Muffled sounds of gorilla violence]
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    Smug DucklingSmug Duckling Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    If my university time taught me anything, it's that I find it really hard to work in the place that I eat and sleep. When I was in the department, I could get up the motivation, but in my room I would dither about and take ages to start anything. I think if I worked from home, I'd have those same issues unless one room was solely dedicated to work and I could lock myself in somehow.

    This.

    If I'm too close to the places that I relax and sleep, I'm put completely out of the mood to work.

    Smug Duckling on
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    EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited July 2009
    The distinction is why a lot of people suggest that if you are going to work at home, or open a home business, you approach it like you're setting up an actual "office." Incidentally, this also makes taxes significantly easier (as tax deductions for home business are based on the "portion" of your house that's used for the business).

    Having a den or a room that is set up like a professional office means that when you're "at work," you're not distracted by all of the other stuff around the house. It's like having a practice space, or a "studio," where you can go and do something. Technically it's just another room but because it's dedicated to some form of work or activity, it's easier to actually work while you're in it.

    And because it's set up that way, it's also easier to meet clients -- and also easier to ignore when you're actually done with work.

    But that fits in with the advice towards getting ready, too. In general, it's best to approach working from home as if you're going to a normal job -- wake up, take a shower, make coffee and whatever, get dressed in something that's not just PJs, and then "go to work." And when you're done, change into something more comfy if you're into that.

    Some people can pull it off without going through any sort of ritual, although I've found that when I do that myself (I can work from home under certain circumstances in my job, like crazy snow) I tend to over-work. At work, I'll type responses like this on this forum, I'll go to the bathroom, I'll talk to people, and I'll leave at my normal time. When I work at home, I subtract all that time -- I feel that I didn't work a full 8 hours, and will often work into the evening. So I don't actually like working from home because, since I don't have it set up, I feel like I'm then "always working."

    EggyToast on
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    SmurphSmurph Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    If I worked from home regularly I would want a dedicated space for it that is at least as productive as my actual office. Since that would mean having multiple monitors and a fairly capable computer, I would find it had to justify having a 'work' rig and a 'play' rig. So I would end up working at the same desk I play at, which would probably be counterproductive. I don't see it working for me unless I have enough space/money to have a personal computer space as well as a home office space.

    Smurph on
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    PatboyXPatboyX Registered User regular
    edited July 2009
    I have enough trouble being contacted at home for work now that they very idea of making my customers understand what is and what is not an emergency (or deserves a call after certain hours) seems impossible.

    PatboyX on
    "lenny bruce is not afraid..."
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