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PAX East Bible

12357

Posts

  • feitocomfrutafeitocomfruta Denver, Colorado, USARegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Okay I'm going to update this on the OP, but I just found out about a Plug-in for Office 2007 that will produce PDFs. Sonow I am going to start compiling this book and see what I have so far. However,I am going to need some help in the way I initially asked: SECTION SUBMISSIONS.

    I'll post the finalized list soon, but please start considering othe sections of PAX, Boston, and Conventions/Expos in genera that you can help submit for.

    In other, more personal news, I am still on the job search and so PAX East s slipping through my fingers. I may have a job soon, I hope I hope I hope, but I dunno how much money I'll be able to get together by PAX East.

    feitocomfruta on
  • 61Ranchero61Ranchero Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I have a question for all of you fine Boston people; I will be traveling out of Salt Lake City and arriving at Logan Airport at 11:38PM on the 25th. Looking at the MBTA site, when I tried to plan a route from the Airport to Hynes Convention Center (I'm staying at the Fenway Howard Johnson and, no, room quality doesn't mean much to me actually) it's returning an error. Look at blue and green line times, that should just about be doable, however, the site seems to thing otherwise.

    So what's the verdict by those in the know? Is that too late to use the T? If so, is a cab my next best bet then? How much does cab fare generally run if so?

    Thanks in advance for the help.

    61Ranchero on
  • MagnifiedXMagnifiedX Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    From what I can tell, you are arriving too late; the MBTA stops running at around 12:30 AM or so. You might just want to get a taxi if possible.

    MagnifiedX on
  • tehnakkitehnakki Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    61Ranchero wrote: »
    So what's the verdict by those in the know? Is that too late to use the T? If so, is a cab my next best bet then? How much does cab fare generally run if so?

    Thanks in advance for the help.

    The T "closes" at midnight, but keeps running the trains for a bit after so since you're not going far you should be fine.

    tehnakki on
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  • LonoLono Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Kalgaroo wrote: »
    Oh yeah, I just thought of something worth mentioning. Boston uses British pronunciations of cities, so they're really weird and not what you expect. For instance:

    Peabody. Like the dog from Rocky and Bullwinkle, right? Nope, it's pronounced Pea-buhddy.
    Worcester is pronounced Wooster.
    Gloucester is pronounced Glouster.
    Woburn is pronounced Wooburn.

    It's probably not something you'll care about too much since those places are fairly out of the way, but something to keep in mind so you don't sound like a tourist.

    I'm from Western MA (The other Massachusetts) and while I don't claim to be Bostonian at all, I do know about the accents here and that the pronunciations actually vary depending on where you are in the state, surprisingly enough.

    In Worcester itself it's pronounced Wiss-ter (Or Wiss-tah, to be local about it). Either way is fine, just don't walk around asking where "War-chester" is. Gloucester is probably more like Glah-ster. Again, no "Chester" on the end of either one of these names. Now, don't be fooled by that standard when you see signs for Dorchester, as it's pronounced just as it sounds (Dorchestah :P).

    Here's a handy pronunciation guide brought to you by the city of Worcester itself.

    As a Masshole who lives 2 hours away from the city, I've been there many, many times, for field trips as a kid to self guided tours, etc. And from an outsiders point of view, I can say that most of the sentiment offered by the people in this thread is accurate:
    • Don't drive in Boston. Just don't. Boston considers itself "America's walking city," and for good reason.
    • Boston is "wicked expensive."
    • The Museum of Fine Art (MFA) is "wicked pissah."
    • DON'T say "wicked pissah" or try to imitate any form of Boston accent or idiolect. It's rude in any culture, and Bostonians aren't known for their friendliness. Nobody cares how often you've seen "The Departed."
    • DO eat in the North End, but try to find a local to guide you to the best places. You can visit Paul Revere's house while you're there, if you want. It's neat.
    • The New England Aquarium does host a Whale Watch, as do several other outfits in the Harbor. Do your research. The Aquarium has far more interesting things to look at, however, i.e. PENGUINS!
    • Check the forecast a day or two before you head out to gauge what to bring for clothing, etc. If it says it's going to be cold, prepare for it, but bring a few warm weather outfits, just in case. If it calls for higher than average temps (50's-60's, as has been said) gauge how comfortable you'll be in relation to what you're accustomed to. If you're from Canada, the Leafs suck, and bring shorts. If you're from the southwest, bring a jacket and warm yet comfortable pants and a winter hat. All in all, be prepared for anything.
    • If you're from New York, the Yankees suck. If you wear a Yankees hat, you may get yelled at. Fair warning.
    • The Prudential Center is most often referred to as "The Pru." It's easier that way.
    • Yes, the roads really were plotted out by some guys following cows around. They're not joking when we say that.
    • The Freedom Trail takes a full day if you really absorb everything it encompasses. And it's a very long walk. Not a recommended tourist stop for PAXers.
    • The Cheers bar you've seen on TV doesn't exist. There are 2 "Cheers" locations in the city, but neither of them will yield a Norm, nor have Woody Harrelson tending bar, unfortunately. The food isn't awesome, and there are better places to get drinks. If you want a dining experience where the staff verbally abuses you, Dick's Last Resort is a blast.
    • Despite how negative this list may seem, Boston is a very fun city.

    Also, here are some great websites and stuff you can put in the bible:

    http://www.bostonusa.com/
    http://www.mos.org/ (Museum of Science)
    http://www.mfa.org/ (Museum of Fine Art)
    http://www.faneuilhallmarketplace.com/ (Faneuil {Fan-you'll} Hall)

    This is basically a 5am rant. Sorry if anything is posted out of place or is unhelpful to you. 83 days left kids!

    Lono on
  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    61Ranchero wrote: »
    I have a question for all of you fine Boston people; I will be traveling out of Salt Lake City and arriving at Logan Airport at 11:38PM on the 25th. Looking at the MBTA site, when I tried to plan a route from the Airport to Hynes Convention Center (I'm staying at the Fenway Howard Johnson and, no, room quality doesn't mean much to me actually) it's returning an error. Look at blue and green line times, that should just about be doable, however, the site seems to thing otherwise.

    So what's the verdict by those in the know? Is that too late to use the T? If so, is a cab my next best bet then? How much does cab fare generally run if so?

    Thanks in advance for the help.

    Cab it. You're supposedly landing at 11:40, it'll likely take a good 15-20 minutes before you've actually collected all of your bags and made it to the shuttle. Then you have to wait for the shuttle and take it to the blue line. Then you have to take that downtown to switch to the green. It ain't happening.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • GundabadGundabad PAX East & Unplugged Tabletop Manager NJRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Cab it. You're supposedly landing at 11:40, it'll likely take a good 15-20 minutes before you've actually collected all of your bags and made it to the shuttle. Then you have to wait for the shuttle and take it to the blue line. Then you have to take that downtown to switch to the green. It ain't happening.
    Just to throw in my opinion, I second what VisionOfClarity is saying here. I have no way of knowing what sort of air travel experience you have, but based on my own, I would say there's no way you make it to a T station if you hit the ground at 11:38. Pony up the cash for a cab and save yourself the stress. The HoJo is not likely to have a free airport shuttle as some of the bigger hotels usually do in major cities, but you should still call the hotel. At worst, they can recommend a reputable cab service, maybe at a discount through an agreement with the hotel. Good luck!

    Gundabad on
  • UncleangryUncleangry ACAM Volunteer Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Just an update for the friendly folks who will be flying in town to join us in Boston for PAX East. I hope everyone has seen the news as of late about the latest attempt made to a commercial jet flight coming into the US. The only reason I bring this up is because of possible issues with Costume designs and ideas. I'd hate to see anyone put so much time and effort into something and have security tell them that they're not boarding a plane with "that" in their luggage.

    Might I suggest that if you have something that could potentially raise an eyebrow through the newly tightened airline security, maybe try and mail it ahead of time? Is there a possibilty of a PAX East post box that attendees could use for such items. Or possibly some in town folks could help out if this actually turns out to be an issue.

    Uncleangry on
    The American Classic Arcade Museum Inc./, is a 501c3 non-profit corporation registered with the State of New Hampshire, which has been established to promote and preserve the history of coin-operated arcade games.
  • whypick1whypick1 PAX [E] Info Booth Manager ~2' from an LCDRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    If you call up the hotel you're staying at, they'll usually agree to receive packages for you before you get there.

    whypick1 on
    Is it PAX <insert nearest future PAX here> yet?
  • 61Ranchero61Ranchero Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    VisionOfClarity, MagnifiedX, tehnakki, Gundabad and anyone I may have missed.

    Thanks for the advice. I'll check with HoJo. It's looking like a cab.

    61Ranchero on
  • OneJDOneJD Registered User
    edited January 2010
    I lived in the Back Bay for two years before moving out of the neighborhood. As others may have already intimated, the Back Bay, where Hynes is located, is the most expensive neighborhood of Boston. It is essentially the commercial, residential, and restaurant center of the city. The South End might have an edge on the back bay in terms of food, and possibly residential as well, but no other neighborhood of the city has it all like the Back Bay.

    Everything will cost you here. Cigarettes are about $8 a pack, unless you smoke some cheap ass ****. Want a good martini? Expect to pay $11. A 10 minute cab ride will cost you $10. Going to ride the T? A round trip will cost you $4.00. A good steak is going to cost you $40+. It isn't as expensive as, say, Paris or Rome, but it is expensive.

    Driving is not as bad as some people make it out to be. It is, however, still bad, and if you're not familiar with driving in a big city (nevermind Boston), you don't even want to think about it unless it's on your bucket list and you're going to die at the end of the weekend.

    But just like any big city, if you know what you're doing, you can get by on the cheap quite easily. So, for example, we have fast food here just like everywhere else and, thankfully, you can walk to pretty much everywhere you'll need to go.

    OneJD on
  • OneJDOneJD Registered User
    edited January 2010
    inecather wrote: »
    Remember that the public transit in Boston is really really great. The #1 bus runs pretty regularly and will get you down to Central Square (and you can walk to Kendal or Inman) or all the way to Harvard and the Green Line will get you to Chinatown and the rest of the city.

    I have a feeling that most of the places around the convention area will be packed. And the majority of those places are chains and restaurants that you can go to pretty much anywhere.

    So if you don't mind taking a short ride on a bus or T - I'd recommend going elsewhere.

    That being said - a few restaurants that I went to as a cheap college student @ Northeastern were Spikes Hot Dogs, JP Licks (only icecream), Pan Thai (on Westland) - and a bunch of tiny little places on Mass Ave between Huntington and Boylston.

    Sorry, but did we live in the same city? Public transportation in Boston is, unfortunately, awful. Compared to cities like Paris or even Rome, it's absolutely horrid and in some cases, an embarrassment. Honestly, let's call a spade a spade. I guess for people who've never ridden a subway before they might think the T is amazing but if you've any familiarity with superior subway systems, you'll know Boston is in some serious trouble. That said, there is a lot of historical significance to Boston's T. The Park Street T station, for example, is the entire country's first subway station. Similarly, Park Street let's off right into the Boston Common, which also happens to be the country's first public park.

    Furthermore, most of the restaurants around the Hynes are not chains or restuarants you can find pretty much anywhere. Abe & Louie's, Atlantic Fish, Stephanie's, Sonsie, Kashmir, Bouchee, Caio Bella, Charlie's, etc., are all limited to Boston and are not chains. Of course, they're all also so-called "upscale" restaurants and so chances are, most people won't be eating there.

    OneJD on
  • HexcoreHexcore Registered User
    edited January 2010
    Don't know if any posted this yet. Old Travel advice were ever you are coming from after your flight arrives stay awake and find some other PAXers and go out till its "local" (east coast) late it will help you adjust to time deference. Look for the Bar crawl when ever Atlus Parker posts it that's a easy way

    Hexcore on
  • GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Hexcore wrote: »
    Don't know if any posted this yet. Old Travel advice were ever you are coming from after your flight arrives stay awake and find some other PAXers and go out till its "local" (east coast) late it will help you adjust to time deference. Look for the Bar crawl when ever Atlus Parker posts it that's a easy way

    Worth noting bars just aren't open that late around here. 1-2am at the latest.

    Grundlestiltskin on
    3DS FC: 2079-6424-8577 | PSN: KaeruX65 | Steam: Karulytic | FFXIV: Wonder Boy
  • EpicPhoenixEpicPhoenix Registered User
    edited January 2010
    If you're staying for longer than the bare minimum, maybe an extra day when you can chill, I can recommend Houston's for the best steak in your entire life, and it's literally right next to Faneuil Hall. It might be expensive as fuck for some of you who are content with a 7-11 taco in a can for dinner, but it's always fun to go to Houston's and then hang out and watch street performers.

    Link.

    EpicPhoenix on
  • dardordardor Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    OneJD wrote: »
    Sorry, but did we live in the same city? Public transportation in Boston is, unfortunately, awful. Compared to cities like Paris or even Rome, it's absolutely horrid and in some cases, an embarrassment. Honestly, let's call a spade a spade. I guess for people who've never ridden a subway before they might think the T is amazing but if you've any familiarity with superior subway systems, you'll know Boston is in some serious trouble.

    What superior subway systems are we talking about here? Personally I like the T more than the NYC subway (it's cleaner) although it's much more expensive. Now I guess the best subway system I've been on is the Taipei metro, but that's because it's ridiculously new compared to everything else.

    dardor on
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  • PimpMethodPimpMethod Registered User
    edited January 2010
    Will there be a coat check?!?!

    PimpMethod on
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  • PimpMethodPimpMethod Registered User
    edited January 2010
    PimpMethod wrote: »
    Will there be a coat check?!?!


    o_O Sorry wrong thread

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  • WingedillidanWingedillidan Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    dardor wrote: »
    OneJD wrote: »
    Sorry, but did we live in the same city? Public transportation in Boston is, unfortunately, awful. Compared to cities like Paris or even Rome, it's absolutely horrid and in some cases, an embarrassment. Honestly, let's call a spade a spade. I guess for people who've never ridden a subway before they might think the T is amazing but if you've any familiarity with superior subway systems, you'll know Boston is in some serious trouble.

    What superior subway systems are we talking about here? Personally I like the T more than the NYC subway (it's cleaner) although it's much more expensive. Now I guess the best subway system I've been on is the Taipei metro, but that's because it's ridiculously new compared to everything else.

    Most of America's train systems are shit right now... As compared to that of the Japanese and Chinese lines (oh crap, I'm breaking an internet rules), that'll get you from point A to point B in half, or more, the time it takes to go the distance of A to B in the Americas. And at super clean and sanitary respect (cheap too)! Probably because these countries NEED mass transportation to get you places for the sheer size of their populations... but we just want to guzzle up gas and put less money into trains and other means of getting places.

    Edit: Not too mention their possession of record-breaking bullet trains that we only have a select few that don't even compare to the efficiency of theirs...

    But yeah, if you plan to travel by car... plan to not use it and just walk, woot for staying at the nearby Sheraton! Which YOU SHOULD DO TOO, great location and is filling with PAX-attendees fast! PAX discount sold out for March 25th already! And yes there's ALWAYS A COAT CHECK, except all the places that don't have one!

    Wingedillidan on
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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    If you're staying for longer than the bare minimum, maybe an extra day when you can chill, I can recommend Houston's for the best steak in your entire life, and it's literally right next to Faneuil Hall. It might be expensive as fuck for some of you who are content with a 7-11 taco in a can for dinner, but it's always fun to go to Houston's and then hang out and watch street performers.

    Link.

    Houston's is kind of a State Street yuppie place. It's very much a hangout for suits who love martinis more than a restaurant. For a good steak I say The Capital Grille in Back Bay.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • EvilTurnipEvilTurnip Registered User
    edited January 2010
    Thanks to all for the great advice and pointers, people. This will be my first PAX, as well as my first time in Boston, so I really do appreciate the tips.

    I'm trying to come up with a general budget for the trip, and this thread and the hotel thread have been pretty useful so far. A PDF or compiled guide would be very useful, too.

    Extra thanks to Goose for the Google map. 8-)

    A tip I just thought of for Canadians like myself who have not left the country in a while, don't forget that you need documentation to visit the U.S. now. A passport, Enhanced Drivers Licence, NEXUS card, FAST card, or secure Indian Status certificate.
    I'm looking into the procedure. A passport takes 2-4 weeks to process, and costs $87.
    The EDL costs $40, but it is not clear if you also need to renew your licence at the same time (+$70). I'll have to call them and ask.
    NEXUS looks like a crazy thing where they fingerprint you (seriously) and grill you about your terrorist connections, but you get a super secure and simple border crossing out of it if you pass their tests.
    FAST card looks like it's only for people who ship freight/packages internationally for work.
    If you're not native, there's little chance of getting the status certificate.

    Hope this proves useful to someone else. I'm glad I thought of this months ahead, and won't have to pay the $70 extra 24 hour passport processing fee.

    EvilTurnip on
  • Irond WillIrond Will WARNING: NO HURTFUL COMMENTS, PLEASE!!!!! Cambridge. MAModerator mod
    edited January 2010
    Just to weigh in on the Boston T. It ain't great - it's old and rickety, kind of slow, has odd coverage, stops running relatively early, breaks down a lot, etc. It does not stack up to most public transport overseas. But it's still probably the third or fourth best public transport in the US. And it is MUCH better than driving in Boston, and much cheaper than taking a cab for most trips. I've lived here in Cambridge for five years and I still refuse to drive anywhere in the city unless direly necessary.

    Also, as to the weather/ temperature thing: unless you are from somewhere that is very cold (and by this I mean western NY, the upper midwest or Canada), Boston will probably seem very cold to you even in late March. The winters here seem to really drag, and the combination of wind, clammy humidity and coldness really put the chill in. Because you are probably going to be walking at some point - whether going to the T or waiting for a bus or just walking to a restaurant or bar - I'd recommend bringing at least one set of warm clothes and a coat.

    Also, I don't really recommend looking for local Boston/ New England cuisine. There just isn't that much interesting local cuisine here. New England has very bland tastes, and most of the little local dives serve mediocre greek-style pizza and subs. The clam chowder you can get here tastes to me about the same as clam chowder you can get anywhere else, and the lobster is no cheaper and no better than you can get anywhere else. There is supposedly better seafood in this city, but I hadn't noticed any huge difference compared to other places I have lived. Boston does have some great restaurants, but not really a distinct signature dish or cuisine.

    Also, I was underwhelmed by the Fire and Ice, though I went to the Harvard one.

    Irond Will on
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  • OneJDOneJD Registered User
    edited January 2010
    I forgot to mention the weather. For those of you who are not from New England, it'll probably seem dreadfully cold to many of you. The average high in March is around 46 degrees, while the average low is around 31. Compare this to a state like DC, which has an average high of around 55 degrees in March.

    Pants.
    Sleeves and/or jackets.

    This is especially important given that you'll be doing most of your traveling by walking, which means you'll be exposed to the weather longer than you might be if you were driving.

    Wind is also a factor here. Depending on the part of the city you're in, the wind chill can get pretty bad.

    Just don't be an idiot and think you can get away with shorts and a t-shirt.

    Also, no, do not go to Houston's for steak. First, it isn't a damn steakhouse. Second, it's basically an everyday restaurant that serves a bit of everything, made to seem more upscale because it's in the financial district and in the center of all the tourist traps. Personally, I wouldn't trust a place's steak if on the same menu they're offering sushi and chicken tenders. If you want steak, go to the aforementioned Capital Grille or Abe & Louie's.

    OneJD on
  • OneJDOneJD Registered User
    edited January 2010
    If you're staying for longer than the bare minimum, maybe an extra day when you can chill, I can recommend Houston's for the best steak in your entire life, and it's literally right next to Faneuil Hall. It might be expensive as fuck for some of you who are content with a 7-11 taco in a can for dinner, but it's always fun to go to Houston's and then hang out and watch street performers.

    Link.

    Houston's is kind of a State Street yuppie place. It's very much a hangout for suits who love martinis more than a restaurant. For a good steak I say The Capital Grille in Back Bay.

    I agree to the extent that you're suggesting Houston's isn't that great. As far as calling it a place for "yuppies," I disagree. I work on State Street and drink there occassionally, but I don't consider myself a "yuppie." LOL.

    OneJD on
  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    OneJD wrote: »
    If you're staying for longer than the bare minimum, maybe an extra day when you can chill, I can recommend Houston's for the best steak in your entire life, and it's literally right next to Faneuil Hall. It might be expensive as fuck for some of you who are content with a 7-11 taco in a can for dinner, but it's always fun to go to Houston's and then hang out and watch street performers.

    Link.

    Houston's is kind of a State Street yuppie place. It's very much a hangout for suits who love martinis more than a restaurant. For a good steak I say The Capital Grille in Back Bay.

    I agree to the extent that you're suggesting Houston's isn't that great. As far as calling it a place for "yuppies," I disagree. I work on State Street and drink there occassionally, but I don't consider myself a "yuppie." LOL.

    http://www.hillstone.com/pdf_menus/houstons/Houstons_Boston.pdf

    If I pay that much for food I expect it to be worth that. A $17 corned beef sandwich is robbery and so is a $14 burger, especially since the quality of the food there doesn't come near to justifying that price and there are more than a few places in that area with better food at a lower price.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    For steaks I've enjoyed the Capital Grille, Smith and Wollensky's, and Mooo. The last two are near Boston Common and are wonderful.

    Grundlestiltskin on
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  • snopromisesnopromise Registered User
    edited January 2010
    Best Places to Eat Near Hynes - Vegetarian Edition
    I worked at the pru for a couple years and went to BU for college, so I've got a couple tips. These are places I know have good vegetarian food, but all my friends in college ate meat, so I'm pretty sure omnivores will like them too.

    Uburger in Kenmore is the best veggie burger I've ever had. Nothing even comes close. Its a bit longer of a walk but your right next to Fenway, so if your into that you can stop by and see the field. Or if your lazy take B,C, or D line to Kenmore.

    Inida Samraat is right by the pru on Mass Ave (toward the bridge), but its a little pricey. Still tastey though.

    Spike's Hot Dog has pretty good veggie dogs and you can dress them up any way you like. Cheap too.

    Anna's Taqueria is my favorite veggie burrito.

    J.P. Licks on Newbury has really good ice cream, and the coffee isn't bad either.

    Chili Duck Thai has good Thai food, plenty of vegetarian options.

    Snappy Sushi / Shino Express has delicious cheap sushi.

    The Pru food court has a couple options, but they are usually meh and overpriced. The burger place has veggie burgers and the panda express sometimes had Schezuan tofu (I don't know if they still do).

    Here's a map of places, open for edit if people want to add things:
    http://bit.ly/6CDZlN

    snopromise on
  • Gsauce@MITGsauce@MIT Registered User
    edited January 2010
    If you are a full spectrum geek (aka, into more then just video games, interests range from sci fi/anime to computers/science, etc) I highly recommend taking the Charlie (the local rail system) to MIT and doing a day self walking tour.

    terrix is right about taking a look at MIT. I'm a student there and it is definitely worth taking the time to look around, even if only for an hour or so.

    MIT gives hour-long tours twice daily M-F at 11am and 3pm. The tours are free and given by real, honest to goodness MIT undergraduates (we're paid, too, so no need to tip!) If you are going alone or with a small group (less than five people) there is no need to call ahead. Just show up about ten minutes prior to the tour time at 77 Massachusetts Avenue (MIT's 'main entrance').

    If you are traveling with a larger group, you can schedule a private tour, which I would recommend. Private tours are also free, so there is really no reason not to take one. This way, your tour guide can also slant the tour information toward your interest and away from undergraduate admissions info and the like. The website and contact info is here.

    MIT also has a museum near Central Square in Cambridge that is open from 10am-5pm daily. Tours generally direct visitors to the museum at its conclusion. Entrance is $7.50 for adults. More info here.

    Hope I don't come off sounding like a spammer here. I was just perusing posts and I read a couple of posts about visiting MIT and thought this info might be helpful. I'm a current MIT tour guide and will also be representing MIT's GAMBIT game lab at PAX (we'll be hosting a conference-wide game, so keep your eyes peeled).

    Gsauce@MIT on
  • Pablo the PenguinPablo the Penguin Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Hope I don't come off sounding like a spammer here. I was just perusing posts and I read a couple of posts about visiting MIT and thought this info might be helpful. I'm a current MIT tour guide and will also be representing MIT's GAMBIT game lab at PAX (we'll be hosting a conference-wide game, so keep your eyes peeled).

    You sound more like a shill to me. But hey, no need to be ashamed of that.......shill......

    Pablo the Penguin on
  • DwayneDaysDwayneDays __BANNED USERS
    edited January 2010
    First off is fenway open at all in march for tours or anything etc?

    Also what bars should I visit if im looking to finally get into a full sweet caroline chant?

    DwayneDays on
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  • DwayneDaysDwayneDays __BANNED USERS
    edited January 2010
    Ugh Sorry I should have posted this in the boston bible, hopefully I dont get a lot of WHAT ARE SPORTS replies ;)

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  • KiashienKiashien Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    No worries.

    I am unsure of Fenway's tour allowances- check their web site, or call them. They vary from year to year.

    As for bars, just head to fenway park, and go hopping. It's worth it, if that's the environment you want- Especially Boston Beer Works.

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    The pirate hat riding bobcat compels you...

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  • DwayneDaysDwayneDays __BANNED USERS
    edited January 2010
    Im actually more excited to finally visit fenway then go to the convention CANNOT WAIT!

    EDIT: Just scoped it tours are 12 bucks and run on the hour every hour from 9-3, <3

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  • ZeroHourHeroZeroHourHero Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    DwayneDays wrote: »
    Im actually more excited to finally visit fenway then go to the convention CANNOT WAIT!

    EDIT: Just scoped it tours are 12 bucks and run on the hour every hour from 9-3, <3

    Dwayne, get with me at some point in the immediate future this is #1 on my list (#2 is the con)

    I've wanted to see Fenway since I was 12 years old and have yet to get the chance.

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  • EvilBadmanEvilBadman DO NOT TRUST THIS MAN Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    DwayneDays wrote: »
    full sweet caroline chant?

    JoCo concert at PAXEast should satisfy this...

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    DwayneDays wrote: »
    First off is fenway open at all in march for tours or anything etc?

    Also what bars should I visit if im looking to finally get into a full sweet caroline chant?

    Come back during the regular season and go to a game. Or see a Neil Diamond concert in the city.

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  • DwayneDaysDwayneDays __BANNED USERS
    edited January 2010
    DwayneDays wrote: »
    First off is fenway open at all in march for tours or anything etc?

    Also what bars should I visit if im looking to finally get into a full sweet caroline chant?

    Come back during the regular season and go to a game. Or see a Neil Diamond concert in the city.

    Im sure if I stay early enough in the ams I can get into a drunken sweet caroline sing along at some point! Is Sam Adams cheap there? Because here in PA im paying 4-5 bucks a draft 2-3 bucks a bottle

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    DwayneDays wrote: »
    DwayneDays wrote: »
    First off is fenway open at all in march for tours or anything etc?

    Also what bars should I visit if im looking to finally get into a full sweet caroline chant?

    Come back during the regular season and go to a game. Or see a Neil Diamond concert in the city.

    Im sure if I stay early enough in the ams I can get into a drunken sweet caroline sing along at some point! Is Sam Adams cheap there? Because here in PA im paying 4-5 bucks a draft 2-3 bucks a bottle

    Most beers in Boston are going to be around $5 a draft give or take $0.50.

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  • DwayneDaysDwayneDays __BANNED USERS
    edited January 2010
    Fail, I thought Sammy would atleast run cheaper there since in PA they classify it as an import for whatever reason

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  • OneJDOneJD Registered User
    edited January 2010
    radiobath wrote: »
    I've lived in Boston all my life. Let me give you a few tips...

    1. Like many people have said here, it's suicide to drive. Boston has been undergoing construction since I was a little one, and it looks like it's not going to be finished in the next 500 years. The roads DO change almost everyday (not a myth!), and you'll end up in a giant circle of detours for hours. Also, in some parts of the city, you can't get a GPS signal because of the buildings. And as for parking, I parked for 2 hours once and paid $45. If you live in New York or somewhere just as bad as our cities and you doesn't afraid of anything, then by all means...your funeral.
    This isn't true at all. True, while 90% of my traveling around the city is done on foot or by T, it is not "suicide to drive." It freaks some people out, sure, but once you're used to it, it's just fine.

    And yes, it is a myth that the roads change almost everyday. I've never seen huntington, boylston, newbury, or comm ave completely shut down requiring me to go a completley different route. Sure, I've seen bits of construction which may require detours, but the detours hardly last for "hours." And the only reason why you paid $45 to park for 2 hours is because you, pal, are a tourist and fell victim to a tourist trap. If I have to take my car out of the garage and park some place in the city, I find 2 hour parking for $2 at a god damn meter. My point is, it's evident that you're not from Boston, which is ok, but it isn't ok to act like you know anything about Boston when you clearly don't. Stick to your suburbs.
    2. The train can be kind of confusing for some people.
    - The official name is the MBTA (Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority). Here is the site. When you're asking for directions, it's best not to ask for the subway, because either they'll lead you to a sub shop or purposely in the wrong direction (Bostonians are a-holes). Call it the train or the T.
    Again, wrong. It's best not to ask for direction PERIOD. And you don't call it the "train or the T." You call it the "T." The problem that with, of course, is that it implies you know enough about Boston to call it the "T," but not enough about Boston to know where the nearest T station is. In other words, you'll stick out like a sore thumb and as such, be identified as a tourist.
    - At night, the drunks and the druggies come crawling out, so I encourage all of you to be *extra* safe. Try to travel with at least one other person, avoid playing with your iPhones or PSPs, and avoid eye contact with anyone who looks sketchy.
    Wrong. Under no circumstances should you be playing your PSP in public anyway.
    3. There are maps all over Boston and Cambridge. If you can't find one and you don't have a map function on your iPhone, the best advice I can give you is to ask a (sober-looking) homeless person! Even though it'll cost you your pocket change, they know the city the best, can give directions you'll understand, and the odds that they'll blow you off are slim-to-none. If you can't spot a good hobo, then ask someone who looks like they speak English.
    I won't even comment on this other than to say how frigging ridiculous it is.
    4. Everything in Boston is expensive. Smokers, expect to pay up to $10 for a pack of cigarettes. Caffeine-addicts, almost $2 per bottle of soda. Even chain stores and fast food places have prices that will make you faint. So don't go there with $50 and think it'll last you the whole weekend, unless you plan on not eating, drinking, taking the train, etc.
    You're probably still reeling from the shock you experienced when you first visited Boston. Yes, it's expensive, but it's not that expensive. It ain't Paris or Rome.
    5. If you're still not scared out of your pants, then have fun! Check out some of the sights! There's an anime/manga/Japanese store in Harvard Square, the MIT Student Center (DDR, pool table, pinball, arcade games), lots of restaurants (Fire And Ice, I highly reccomend!), tons of museums (Museum of Science has a lightning show, animal exhibits, a planetarium), a great aquarium with an IMAX theater, Newbury Comics, Newbury Street (Hello Kitty store!), Duck Tours (be sure to quack at people)...

    The store in Harvard Square is called "Tokyo Kid," and its in a building called "The Garage." There's also a pizza shop in the Garage called "Crazy Doughs," which has won awards in the past for their pizza. It's not New York style, but it's pretty good.

    Fire and Ice flat out sucks. You must not know food.

    OneJD on
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