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Apple To Developers: Fuck You

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Posts

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Yeah, I meant in a computer.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • WazzaWazza Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    What are those kids doing? I have had my netbook for over a year and outside of a small scratch on the outside, it's just fine.

    Wazza on
  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    Kagera wrote: »
    In a computer? No.

    So you would buy a pink laptop if it did everything you wanted amazingly well, then?

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • KageraKagera Imitating the worst people. Since 2004Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Kagera wrote: »
    In a computer? No.

    So you would buy a pink laptop if it did everything you wanted amazingly well, then?

    If it was cheaper than a similarly specced laptop? Sure. I have a niece who LOVES pink so she'd get a kick out of it too, which is a bonus.

    Kagera on
    My neck, my back, my FUPA and my crack.
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Wazza wrote: »
    What are those kids doing? I have had my netbook for over a year and outside of a small scratch on the outside, it's just fine.

    Using them, I guess. I tend to be careful with my own economy-class laptop (a $700 HP Pavillion, which I hastily bought to replace a 6-year-old Dell Inspiron). But I don't take it outside, and I still have a few scratches.

    And they're not really "kids"--they're between 18 and my age (23). A few are older.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • WazzaWazza Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    What are those kids doing? I have had my netbook for over a year and outside of a small scratch on the outside, it's just fine.

    Using them, I guess. I tend to be careful with my own economy-class laptop (a $700 HP Pavillion, which I hastily bought to replace a 6-year-old Dell Inspiron). But I don't take it outside, and I still have a few scratches.

    And they're not really "kids"--they're between 18 and my age (23). A few are older.

    I should take that back, I ran my Dell laptop into the ground as an undergrad/grad student. A lot of it's time was spent being lugged around in my bag. The same goes for my netbook which of course is much smaller, yet has not shown any of the same wear as my Dell did after a year while being treated roughly the same.

    I am a graduate student instructor and I still call my students "kids", in spite of the fact that they are not much younger than I am (though I do have a student in his 60s in one of my discussions).

    Wazza on
  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    Kagera wrote: »
    Kagera wrote: »
    In a computer? No.

    So you would buy a pink laptop if it did everything you wanted amazingly well, then?

    If it was cheaper than a similarly specced laptop? Sure. I have a niece who LOVES pink so she'd get a kick out of it too, which is a bonus.

    I think you're an exception.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • nescientistnescientist Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Kagera wrote: »
    In a computer? No.

    So you would buy a pink laptop if it did everything you wanted amazingly well, then?

    Funny story, I almost did because it was the only thing I could find with a Z510 (super low currency processor) I would have painted/covered with stickers/amusing casemod'd the thing, though, probably. Eventually. I dunno, I'm pretty lazy. But then my computer-budget suddenly doubled from $250 to $500 and I snagged an N330 Ion :D (basically a plastic macbook air, if I get around to putting an SSD in)

    nescientist on
    Carl Sagan wrote:
    The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars.
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Wazza wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    What are those kids doing? I have had my netbook for over a year and outside of a small scratch on the outside, it's just fine.

    Using them, I guess. I tend to be careful with my own economy-class laptop (a $700 HP Pavillion, which I hastily bought to replace a 6-year-old Dell Inspiron). But I don't take it outside, and I still have a few scratches.

    And they're not really "kids"--they're between 18 and my age (23). A few are older.

    I should take that back, I ran my Dell laptop into the ground as an undergrad/grad student. A lot of it's time was spent being lugged around in my bag. The same goes for my netbook which of course is much smaller, yet has not shown any of the same wear as my Dell did after a year while being treated roughly the same.

    I am a graduate student instructor and I still call my students "kids", in spite of the fact that they are not much younger than I am (though I do have a student in his 60s in one of my discussions).

    Heh, I never do that.

    Macs are not as common in the History Department as in others (such as Journalism), but there are still a decent number of them. And at least MacBooks are not magically more resilient than other plastic laptops. They just show wear-and-tear much easier because they're white.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited April 2010
    Going to art school, I've seen alot of dirty, nasty, charcol crusted macbooks. My XPS may look like a giant dinosaur now, but at least I can keep it clean, even 4 years later. Something about the surface of the Mac book they sold 4 years ago absorbed terrible things to be found at college. I could always just wipe paint right off.

    Iruka on
  • UnderTheBridgeUnderTheBridge Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    I like how most of this argument is "Macs are pretty." Im more inclined to function over form, but then again I think my PC looks pretty snazzy.

    As for messy cables: they do bother me but they are easily rectified with some zip ties and ingenuity.

    UnderTheBridge on
    stvincentsig.jpg
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    I've got an incredible number of cables behind my desktop. But that's inevitable.

    > I prefer a wired internet connection over a wireless one. My ISP is crappy, and I need everything I can get.
    > I don't have built-in speakers.
    > I use an awesome Logitech G940 HOTAS, which demands a larger number of cords and its only power supply.
    > TrackIR also uses a cable.
    > My printer is connected.

    I recently switched over to a wireless keyboard and mouse, but that was because I bought HDMI to DVI cables to connect my PC to my television screen.

    So, basically, owning a iMac would make no difference (except maybe I couldn't use TrackIR or my G940 HOTAS). I really need to organize behind there.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    I like how most of this argument is "Macs are pretty."

    Well, if you really want to strawman, sure.

    The reality is that some people value usability and design as much as pure functionality, and are willing pay extra for it.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • JokermanJokerman V.Vaughn, The Vaudeville Vilnian Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    I like how most of this argument is "Macs are pretty."

    Well, if you really want to strawman, sure.

    The reality is that some people value usability and design as much as pure functionality, and are willing pay extra for it.

    What does Usability mean? The ease of ability of something to be used?

    Because if that's the case then my 500 dollar HP laptop has high usability.

    Jokerman on
  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    Jokerman wrote: »
    I like how most of this argument is "Macs are pretty."

    Well, if you really want to strawman, sure.

    The reality is that some people value usability and design as much as pure functionality, and are willing pay extra for it.

    What does Usability mean? The ease of ability of something to be used?

    Because if that's the case then my 500 dollar HP laptop has high usability.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usability#Definition

    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • WazzaWazza Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    Wazza on
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    shryke on
  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    Yeah, as the article I linked states, some aspects of usability (such as "satisfaction" and "memorability") are probably qualitative, and therefore subjective. Other aspects aren't though. In academia, such as in computer science and information science, it is commonly accepted that Macs have superior UI.

    For me, it took me a couple of weeks to get used to the user interface, and I started to really love it after a month or so. Now every time I use a PC it feels.... clunky.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • JokermanJokerman V.Vaughn, The Vaudeville Vilnian Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    Jokerman on
  • LanzLanz Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    Again:

    They make mice that have more than two buttons or react in such a way, the OS supports things like scroll wheels and multiple buttons on mice and support non-Apple mice if their non-One Button mice are not satisfactory.

    EDIT: and this post is coming from a life-long PC user whose only experiences with Macs have been for classes, fiddling with a friend's Mac and MacBook and in-store demo units

    Lanz on
    waNkm4k.jpg?1
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Lanz wrote: »
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    Again:

    They make mice that have more than two buttons or react in such a way, the OS supports things like scroll wheels and multiple buttons on mice and support non-Apple mice if their non-One Button mice are not satisfactory.

    EDIT: and this post is coming from a life-long PC user whose only experiences with Macs have been for classes, fiddling with a friend's Mac and MacBook and in-store demo units

    Apparently you've got to pay extra for them or something?

    Cause the Macs I've dealt with and the models I've seen in store have been the "classic" one-button affair.

    Like using a computer with a sharpened piece of flint.

    shryke on
  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited April 2010
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    It's pretty funny because I've never had to deal with lock ups or blue screens or bootup failures on my Mac in the three years I've owned it.

    So yeah, mine just works. I don't know about other people.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • UnderTheBridgeUnderTheBridge Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    I like how most of this argument is "Macs are pretty."

    Well, if you really want to strawman, sure.

    The reality is that some people value usability and design as much as pure functionality, and are willing pay extra for it.

    I'll give you design, but I think usability is more attuned with how your mind works. I've always considered Windows rather natural feeling, but then there are people who find it totally foreign. My best friend works on PCs all day, but cant work the wheel on my older iPod to save his life.

    UnderTheBridge on
    stvincentsig.jpg
  • PhyphorPhyphor Building Planet Busters Tasting FruitRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    It's pretty funny because I've never had to deal with lock ups or blue screens or bootup failures on my Mac in the three years I've owned it.

    So yeah, mine just works. I don't know about other people.

    The vast majority of bluescreens are not actually Microsoft's fault. Also, I can't remember the last bluescreen I've seen that I didn't cause (well there are a few I've seen at work due to installing winxp drivers in pre-release win7 but they hardly count).

    Phyphor on
  • GlalGlal Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.
    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.
    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.
    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.
    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!
    But shryke, it just works!
    It's pretty funny because I've never had to deal with lock ups or blue screens or bootup failures on my Mac in the three years I've owned it.
    So yeah, mine just works. I don't know about other people.
    Apparently my XP machine is also a Mac now. themoreyouknow.jpg

    Glal on
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    It's pretty funny because I've never had to deal with lock ups or blue screens or bootup failures on my Mac in the three years I've owned it.

    So yeah, mine just works. I don't know about other people.

    I wish I could say that, but years in the journalism department and design labs have taught me otherwise, Macs, in this case, "do not just work". More like, "I think this will work".

    My current Windows 7 setup works quite reliably--I wouldn't go as ballsy as "it just works", but it certainly beat those lab machines through and through.

    Of course, if it works for you, that's no reason not to try it.

    Honestly, the quality of the iMacs owned by the school (very poor) has no doubt effected by judgment of them. That being said, I did not really find even well-working OSX to be more intuitive--in fact, the opposite was true until I actually learned how to use them properly. They were just different, not better, not worse, but different.

    Eh, I don't know what to say. Add to the fact that, before that, I live outside the United States, specifically where Mac's own support is notably weaker than that of its competitors.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    edited April 2010
    shryke wrote: »
    Lanz wrote: »
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    Again:

    They make mice that have more than two buttons or react in such a way, the OS supports things like scroll wheels and multiple buttons on mice and support non-Apple mice if their non-One Button mice are not satisfactory.

    EDIT: and this post is coming from a life-long PC user whose only experiences with Macs have been for classes, fiddling with a friend's Mac and MacBook and in-store demo units

    Apparently you've got to pay extra for them or something?

    Cause the Macs I've dealt with and the models I've seen in store have been the "classic" one-button affair.

    Like using a computer with a sharpened piece of flint.
    macs now come with a mouse than has a multitouch interface on the top that can recognise gestures, has two clickable button zones, and can scroll simply by brushing your finger across the top.

    With a simple free 3rd party software download, you can turn it into a 20-someodd button mouse (1 finger click, 2 finger click, 3 finger click, two finger down swipe, three finger up swipe etc etc.)

    Apple hasn't made a truly one button mouse for like 5 years. And the mouse they made 5 years ago introduced hardware 360" scrolling via a scrollball in place of a wheel, which is something I miss whenever I don't have access to (read: every PC mouse).

    Your info is out of date there, bud.

    syndalis on
    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • EvanderEvander Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Evander wrote: »
    Perpetual wrote: »
    So, you know, I get where the comments about "elitism" and "snobbery" come from when talking about Apple enthusiasts, because God knows I know they exist. But in this case, even if it's just brand-based snobbery, the products being purchased are still incredibly high quality. Are people buying those products for other reasons than rote performance? I'm sure they are. But that doesn't mean all that much in this instance.

    Fucking win right here.

    My only gripe about Apple gadgets is their battery life, but I buy Apple Protection Plan with them anyway, which is like paying a flat amount for unlimited number of replacements. I think I've exchanged my 2nd gen ipod for free like 3 times before they finally said they ran out.

    So when they run out, you're SOL?

    What stops them from lying about that, because they want you to buy a new device?

    If they run out and your warranty isn't up, they give you an equivalent model new device.

    Good. I was going to say, the "we ran out" excuse sounds like a Circuit City warranty tactic.

    Evander on
  • EvanderEvander Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    bongi wrote: »
    Evander wrote: »
    Perpetual wrote: »
    Evander wrote: »
    The price to cost ratio on apple products is generally a lot larger than on other goods, even other consumer entertainment electronics goods.

    When you buy a non-commodity product or service, you aren't only paying for the materials that were used to build it or provide it. You are also paying for the experience.

    Why do people go to the movie theater when they can rent the same movie for a lot less? Simple: for the experience of watching the movie in a theater. Now, the movie ticket will probably be too expensive for some people. That's fine. Yet do those people say "god damn movie theater being elitist by charging so much"? Does anyone argue that movie theaters "push the market in a consumer negative direction"? No, because that would be fucking silly.

    The reasoning when it comes to Apple products is not exactly the same, but it's very similar. You aren't only paying for a touch-screen device that can browse the internet and read books and listen to music. You are paying for the experience of owning an iPad.

    Bull. Shit.

    The same device made by any other company would offer the same experience at a lower cost.

    Or it wouldn't now, because Apple has already set a certain price for the market, THAT particular fact being the sole issue that I have with Apple, that their actions poison the rest of the market, turning ALL pricing consumer negative in certain areas.

    Let's drop the iPad, though, since no one was talking about it anyway, and get back to MP3 players.

    What is the "experience" of an ipod that you do not get with other comperable (and cheaper) devices? That has yet to be explained to me.

    Go read Stephen Fry talking about Apple products and then come back.

    It's pretty obvious from the way you've talked about gadgets before that you have absolutely no appreciation for design, though, so it feels like something of a lost cause telling you.

    A little bit of design is worth hundreds of dollars? Really?

    I'm not talking ergonomics here, I'm talking aesthetic. Not to mention that aesthetics are rather subjective.

    You want to talk about poor design; without purchasing some kind of peripheral, the only way to type on an iPad is hunt and peck with one finger, while holding it with the other hand.

    Evander on
  • EvanderEvander Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Synthesis wrote: »
    They were just different, not better, not worse, but different.

    This is what it all boils down to.

    9 times out of ten when there is a problem with the broadcast in my radio station, it is because the Mac is fucked up again. Now, I'm even willing to admit that the majority of that is probably user error, but the point can be made that when user error occurs so often, it doesn't "just work".

    Which is fine. No device "just works" 100% of the time. Claiming that it does, however, is the bit that is wrong.

    The modern offerings from Apple are well-built, overpriced, and otherwise the same as everything from everyone else. If the build quality or the design is worth the large mark up to you, then by all means, get it and enjoy. Insisting that it is the best for EVERYONE is the insane part, though. It just sounds like "Well if the peasants have no bread, then let them eat cake."

    Evander on
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Well, yes, it is a rather ballsy advertising line.

    But of course, common sense tells us that advertising is supposed to be great deal of lying mixed with embellishing the truth and then some degree of actual, unaltered truth. So that's okay.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    syndalis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Lanz wrote: »
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    Again:

    They make mice that have more than two buttons or react in such a way, the OS supports things like scroll wheels and multiple buttons on mice and support non-Apple mice if their non-One Button mice are not satisfactory.

    EDIT: and this post is coming from a life-long PC user whose only experiences with Macs have been for classes, fiddling with a friend's Mac and MacBook and in-store demo units

    Apparently you've got to pay extra for them or something?

    Cause the Macs I've dealt with and the models I've seen in store have been the "classic" one-button affair.

    Like using a computer with a sharpened piece of flint.
    macs now come with a mouse than has a multitouch interface on the top that can recognise gestures, has two clickable button zones, and can scroll simply by brushing your finger across the top.

    With a simple free 3rd party software download, you can turn it into a 20-someodd button mouse (1 finger click, 2 finger click, 3 finger click, two finger down swipe, three finger up swipe etc etc.)

    Apple hasn't made a truly one button mouse for like 5 years. And the mouse they made 5 years ago introduced hardware 360" scrolling via a scrollball in place of a wheel, which is something I miss whenever I don't have access to (read: every PC mouse).

    Your info is out of date there, bud.

    Yes, cause no one uses 5 year old computers.....


    And really, 5 years ago is when they moved away from the one button mouse? Next thing you know, they'll stop using punchcards!

    shryke on
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    edited April 2010
    shryke wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Lanz wrote: »
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    Again:

    They make mice that have more than two buttons or react in such a way, the OS supports things like scroll wheels and multiple buttons on mice and support non-Apple mice if their non-One Button mice are not satisfactory.

    EDIT: and this post is coming from a life-long PC user whose only experiences with Macs have been for classes, fiddling with a friend's Mac and MacBook and in-store demo units

    Apparently you've got to pay extra for them or something?

    Cause the Macs I've dealt with and the models I've seen in store have been the "classic" one-button affair.

    Like using a computer with a sharpened piece of flint.
    macs now come with a mouse than has a multitouch interface on the top that can recognise gestures, has two clickable button zones, and can scroll simply by brushing your finger across the top.

    With a simple free 3rd party software download, you can turn it into a 20-someodd button mouse (1 finger click, 2 finger click, 3 finger click, two finger down swipe, three finger up swipe etc etc.)

    Apple hasn't made a truly one button mouse for like 5 years. And the mouse they made 5 years ago introduced hardware 360" scrolling via a scrollball in place of a wheel, which is something I miss whenever I don't have access to (read: every PC mouse).

    Your info is out of date there, bud.

    Yes, cause no one uses 5 year old computers.....


    And really, 5 years ago is when they moved away from the one button mouse? Next thing you know, they'll stop using punchcards!
    Five years ago PCs out of the box had the security of a wet paper bag. And since there are a bunch of people who still use five year old PCs, I guess it's okay to say windows machines are wildly vulnerable to viruses just by being connected to the internet. And I'll just ignore the fact that you could buy antivirus apps for the PC to rectify this (just like you could buy any mouse on the market and hook it up the mac, as early as OS8 or 9, to get multiple button support)

    syndalis on
    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • AtomikaAtomika Cinema Vampire (alleged) Trans 🏳️‍⚧️ SylvaniaRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Evander wrote: »
    A little bit of design is worth hundreds of dollars? Really?

    I'm not talking ergonomics here, I'm talking aesthetic. Not to mention that aesthetics are rather subjective.

    A strong factor for myself in a PC is its ability to sit comfortably on my desk. In the past, that's always meant a giant tower, a bulky CRT monitor, and a mess of wires and peripherals. Right now, I have a rather nice (but older) laptop running XP attached to a LCD monitor, with peripheral subwoofer and speakers. I have less clutter than I did, but I still have a lot of crap on my desk, and a ton of wires.

    When I buy my iMac later this year, I'll have two wires: the power cable, and the usb cable from my WACOM tablet. Printing will be wireless. Speakers will be on-board, the screen will be attached to the system

    So yes, for me, the "little bit" of design is worth the extra money. "Extra money" being an errant term, since a comparable machine isn't all that much cheaper.
    You want to talk about poor design; without purchasing some kind of peripheral, the only way to type on an iPad is hunt and peck with one finger, while holding it with the other hand.

    Or by setting it on your lap or your desk. I can't think of too many content-creation modes one can engage in during situations where you can't sit down. It's true that it's hardet to use the keyboard when riding on the subway; that's not usually when I'm doing work.

    Atomika on
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    syndalis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Lanz wrote: »
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    Again:

    They make mice that have more than two buttons or react in such a way, the OS supports things like scroll wheels and multiple buttons on mice and support non-Apple mice if their non-One Button mice are not satisfactory.

    EDIT: and this post is coming from a life-long PC user whose only experiences with Macs have been for classes, fiddling with a friend's Mac and MacBook and in-store demo units

    Apparently you've got to pay extra for them or something?

    Cause the Macs I've dealt with and the models I've seen in store have been the "classic" one-button affair.

    Like using a computer with a sharpened piece of flint.
    macs now come with a mouse than has a multitouch interface on the top that can recognise gestures, has two clickable button zones, and can scroll simply by brushing your finger across the top.

    With a simple free 3rd party software download, you can turn it into a 20-someodd button mouse (1 finger click, 2 finger click, 3 finger click, two finger down swipe, three finger up swipe etc etc.)

    Apple hasn't made a truly one button mouse for like 5 years. And the mouse they made 5 years ago introduced hardware 360" scrolling via a scrollball in place of a wheel, which is something I miss whenever I don't have access to (read: every PC mouse).

    Your info is out of date there, bud.

    Yes, cause no one uses 5 year old computers.....


    And really, 5 years ago is when they moved away from the one button mouse? Next thing you know, they'll stop using punchcards!
    Five years ago PCs out of the box had the security of a wet paper bag. And since there are a bunch of people who still use five year old PCs, I guess it's okay to say windows machines are wildly vulnerable to viruses just by being connected to the internet. And I'll just ignore the fact that you could buy antivirus apps for the PC to rectify this (just like you could buy any mouse on the market and hook it up the mac, as early as OS8 or 9, to get multiple button support)

    When did we start talking about viruses?

    I must have missed that segue somewhere.

    shryke on
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    edited April 2010
    shryke wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Lanz wrote: »
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    Again:

    They make mice that have more than two buttons or react in such a way, the OS supports things like scroll wheels and multiple buttons on mice and support non-Apple mice if their non-One Button mice are not satisfactory.

    EDIT: and this post is coming from a life-long PC user whose only experiences with Macs have been for classes, fiddling with a friend's Mac and MacBook and in-store demo units

    Apparently you've got to pay extra for them or something?

    Cause the Macs I've dealt with and the models I've seen in store have been the "classic" one-button affair.

    Like using a computer with a sharpened piece of flint.
    macs now come with a mouse than has a multitouch interface on the top that can recognise gestures, has two clickable button zones, and can scroll simply by brushing your finger across the top.

    With a simple free 3rd party software download, you can turn it into a 20-someodd button mouse (1 finger click, 2 finger click, 3 finger click, two finger down swipe, three finger up swipe etc etc.)

    Apple hasn't made a truly one button mouse for like 5 years. And the mouse they made 5 years ago introduced hardware 360" scrolling via a scrollball in place of a wheel, which is something I miss whenever I don't have access to (read: every PC mouse).

    Your info is out of date there, bud.

    Yes, cause no one uses 5 year old computers.....


    And really, 5 years ago is when they moved away from the one button mouse? Next thing you know, they'll stop using punchcards!
    Five years ago PCs out of the box had the security of a wet paper bag. And since there are a bunch of people who still use five year old PCs, I guess it's okay to say windows machines are wildly vulnerable to viruses just by being connected to the internet. And I'll just ignore the fact that you could buy antivirus apps for the PC to rectify this (just like you could buy any mouse on the market and hook it up the mac, as early as OS8 or 9, to get multiple button support)

    When did we start talking about viruses?

    I must have missed that segue somewhere.

    Judging a current platform by its past (and especially corrected) issues is silly.

    Just like it is silly to say windows is an unsecure OS; Since Vista they really got their shit in place on the user model... it is also silly to say apple sucks because they have one button mice. They havent done that for ages. And even when they did do it you had tons of options to make ctrl-click (which still functions as a right click in the modern OS) work on the alternate mouse button of a 3rd party mouse.

    syndalis on
    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • Shazkar ShadowstormShazkar Shadowstorm Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    this entire thread is off topic hah

    Shazkar Shadowstorm on
    poo
  • AtomikaAtomika Cinema Vampire (alleged) Trans 🏳️‍⚧️ SylvaniaRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    shryke wrote: »
    When did we start talking about viruses?

    I must have missed that segue somewhere.

    He made an allusion to another five-year old computing issue that no one makes a big deal about.

    Keep up.

    Atomika on
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    syndalis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Lanz wrote: »
    Jokerman wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Wazza wrote: »
    I own both a PC and a Mac. I find the Mac's user interface far more intuitive, smooth, and pleasant.

    I never understood what Apple users meant by this until I actually owned a Mac though.

    Is that something you would only pick up if you own one or use one for extended periods of time? I was raised with macs (albeit 15 years ago) and have used them every now and then since, and I find that I have a much easier time navigating and manipulating Windows-based OS's.

    I've found Macs to be the least intuitive OS to use on a basic level.

    Also, 1-button mouse. Where's my scroll wheel assholes!

    But shryke, it just works!

    Again:

    They make mice that have more than two buttons or react in such a way, the OS supports things like scroll wheels and multiple buttons on mice and support non-Apple mice if their non-One Button mice are not satisfactory.

    EDIT: and this post is coming from a life-long PC user whose only experiences with Macs have been for classes, fiddling with a friend's Mac and MacBook and in-store demo units

    Apparently you've got to pay extra for them or something?

    Cause the Macs I've dealt with and the models I've seen in store have been the "classic" one-button affair.

    Like using a computer with a sharpened piece of flint.
    macs now come with a mouse than has a multitouch interface on the top that can recognise gestures, has two clickable button zones, and can scroll simply by brushing your finger across the top.

    With a simple free 3rd party software download, you can turn it into a 20-someodd button mouse (1 finger click, 2 finger click, 3 finger click, two finger down swipe, three finger up swipe etc etc.)

    Apple hasn't made a truly one button mouse for like 5 years. And the mouse they made 5 years ago introduced hardware 360" scrolling via a scrollball in place of a wheel, which is something I miss whenever I don't have access to (read: every PC mouse).

    Your info is out of date there, bud.

    Yes, cause no one uses 5 year old computers.....


    And really, 5 years ago is when they moved away from the one button mouse? Next thing you know, they'll stop using punchcards!
    Five years ago PCs out of the box had the security of a wet paper bag. And since there are a bunch of people who still use five year old PCs, I guess it's okay to say windows machines are wildly vulnerable to viruses just by being connected to the internet. And I'll just ignore the fact that you could buy antivirus apps for the PC to rectify this (just like you could buy any mouse on the market and hook it up the mac, as early as OS8 or 9, to get multiple button support)

    When did we start talking about viruses?

    I must have missed that segue somewhere.

    Judging a current platform by its past (and especially corrected) issues is silly.

    Just like it is silly to say windows is an unsecure OS; Since Vista they really got their shit in place on the user model... it is also silly to say apple sucks because they have one button mice. They havent done that for ages. And even when they did do it you had tons of options to make ctrl-click (which still functions as a right click in the modern OS) work on the alternate mouse button of a 3rd party mouse.

    We're talking about usability, not viruses. Try to stay on topic (that topic being the off-topic tangent).

    Though it's funny as a "multi-touch interface" makes ME go wtf. I'm only imagining what the less computer illiterate are gonna do with it.

    shryke on
  • AtomikaAtomika Cinema Vampire (alleged) Trans 🏳️‍⚧️ SylvaniaRegistered User regular
    edited April 2010
    shryke wrote: »
    Though it's funny as a "multi-touch interface" makes ME go wtf. I'm only imagining what the less computer illiterate are gonna do with it.

    The 80 million or so people already using it with the iPhone and iPod Touch seem to be getting on.

    Atomika on
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