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Deceptive Business Practices -- What's Your Take?

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Posts

  • nescientistnescientist Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Well, I think it's a good thing that we print a sane serving size on containers if only to give people the clue to perhaps put that crap down and save some for later, but certainly it's no great burden to add a column in the nutrition facts with the data for a full container.

    nescientist on
    Carl Sagan wrote:
    The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars.
  • PataPata Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Slider wrote: »
    Another thing I thorougly enjoy. Packages of food that do not contain a reasonable amount of food: i.e. potato chips.

    Why am I buying a bag of potato chips that is half full of air? And why hasn't anybody complained about this?

    Is it too much for them to fill the bag, at least, 75% with potato chips?

    If you filled a bag all the way with chips, it would end up being a crushed pile of potato chip crumbs.

    Pata on
    SRWWSig.pngEpisode 5: Mecha-World, Mecha-nisim, Mecha-beasts
  • Magus`Magus` Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Perhaps they should all do the Pringle thing? Would save space AND be more visually 'truthful'.

    Magus` on
  • MidshipmanMidshipman Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    bowen wrote:
    Bunch of steam stuff.

    Why did your credit card company dispute the charge in the first place?
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    This is annoying, but not half so much as the retarded serving sizes they post. "Oh, awesome, this bag of chips is only 100 calories per serving! And let's see, a serving is... two chips. Oh."

    Yeah, I actually think there should be some legislation to prevent this kind of thing. It's ridiculously misleading to the public, especially considering America's obesity epidemic. Like, you shouldn't be able to sell things that are not whole servings. If that means you either increase the consideration of what a serving is or you decrease the volume of the packaging, I don't care.

    Just about every 20oz. drink is listed as being 2.5 servings. For calorically-sweetened products, this is hugely dangerous to an unwitting public. Instead of that 105 calories you think you're getting in that bottle of Coke, you're actually getting over 250.


    Thanks, Coke!

    The serving size is actually set by the FDA, not the company that makes the product. I do agree that they are unrealistic compared to the amount that an average person would consume in one go.

    Midshipman on
    midshipman.jpg
  • AtomikaAtomika Brought to you by Technicolor™ Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    Well, I think it's a good thing that we print a sane serving size on containers if only to give people the clue to perhaps put that crap down and save some for later, but certainly it's no great burden to add a column in the nutrition facts with the data for a full container.

    A 20oz bottle has no corporate intent of being anything more than a single serving.

    I have no problem with the FDA telling people what a healthy amount is, but that's not how people consume products, and it's not how they're sold.


    Or here's one:
    What about frozen/quickly-perishable goods, like Slurpees? You're physically incapable of making that thing last longer than 30 minutes before it melts back to liquid, but considering that 7-11 sells them in sizes upwards of 32oz, I wonder what the FDA considers an acceptable serving.

    Atomika on
  • nescientistnescientist Registered User regular
    edited April 2010
    God, they'd better not list Slurpee nutrition in n-ounce servings (where n is a number other than whatever the cup is). But then again, when's the last time anyone even thought about the nutrition stats of a Slurpee? Is it ever listed anywhere? Not that I really need that to know it's basically HFCS, carbonated water, and color. You know, like 90% of all beverages.

    nescientist on
    Carl Sagan wrote:
    The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars.
  • His CorkinessHis Corkiness Registered User
    edited April 2010
    The second is that supermarkets are now required by law to list the unit price of all goods. It makes shopping so unbelievably easy when you can pick the cheapest at a glance, but also means its easy to figure out what price/quality level you want (and what's a rip off).
    This really is the boss. Saves me doing the math in my head, and makes looking at an entire rack of similar products much less of a hassle. Hell, I pay more attention to the unit price than the product price, as I tend to buy the same stuff every week.

    His Corkiness on
  • marz_1982marz_1982 Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    A quite sneaky practice has started here in South Africa, not sure how common it is worldwide. With the popularity of cell phones going through the roof (I think it's more common nowadays to have a cell than a land-line here), lots of dodgy companies are making use of this rocketing market.

    The first trick I've seen - they advertise some "free" cellphone game, picture or ring tone, you sms a number to get the download link. You may not realise that from then on, your cellphone account is being deducted by between R10-R50 a week... Yup, by sms-ing a number, you've actually subscribed to an expensive game/ring tone service.

    Getting unsubscribed is apparently a mission and a half. You generally have to go to the website to see the small print about the subscription fees.
    TV adverts will display the "fine print" in really small writing, briefly at the end of the advert. The worst part about this, is if the fee is relatively small, you may not even realise they're whittling your airtime down every week.

    The second trick - you do a "free" IQ test, but you have to submit your cell phone number to get the "results". The fine print details that by submitting your cell phone number you agree to subscribe to their service.

    marz_1982 on
  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    marz_1982 wrote: »
    A quite sneaky practice has started here in South Africa, not sure how common it is worldwide. With the popularity of cell phones going through the roof (I think it's more common nowadays to have a cell than a land-line here), lots of dodgy companies are making use of this rocketing market.

    The first trick I've seen - they advertise some "free" cellphone game, picture or ring tone, you sms a number to get the download link. You may not realise that from then on, your cellphone account is being deducted by between R10-R50 a week... Yup, by sms-ing a number, you've actually subscribed to an expensive game/ring tone service.

    Getting unsubscribed is apparently a mission and a half. You generally have to go to the website to see the small print about the subscription fees.
    TV adverts will display the "fine print" in really small writing, briefly at the end of the advert. The worst part about this, is if the fee is relatively small, you may not even realise they're whittling your airtime down every week.

    The second trick - you do a "free" IQ test, but you have to submit your cell phone number to get the "results". The fine print details that by submitting your cell phone number you agree to subscribe to their service.

    Oh, this has been common here (the U.S.) for a while now.

    mcdermott on
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    There was a bit of a problem with that in the UK a while ago.

    The regulations for that kind of thing now state that if you text the word "STOP" as a reply to any message they send you, or the number you originally texted to sign up, then they have to unsubscribe you. If they don't, you can report them to your operator and you won't be charged.

    japan on
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