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Watchmen.

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Posts

  • BriareosBriareos Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    I see what Shoggoth and Disturbed are saying. On the one hand, there is little reason to deviate from the way Moore set up the character (as Shoggoth points out). On the other hand, it is hard to instill in the audience just how otherwordly Doc is without a little visual enhancement. In the graphic novel, we can read Doc's thoughts and thus get a sense of just how disconnected he is. In a movie, we won't get that kind of characterization. The impact has to come another way, and maybe that way should be visual.

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  • Disturbed_1Disturbed_1 Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Briareos wrote: »
    I see what Shoggoth and Disturbed are saying. On the one hand, there is little reason to deviate from the way Moore set up the character (as Shoggoth points out). On the other hand, it is hard to instill in the audience just how otherwordly Doc is without a little visual enhancement. In the graphic novel, we can read Doc's thoughts and thus get a sense of just how disconnected he is. In a movie, we won't get that kind of characterization. The impact has to come another way, and maybe that way should be visual.


    Exactly

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  • HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User
    edited April 2007
    We could never read Doc Manhattan's thoughts.

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  • DasUberEdwardDasUberEdward Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Briareos wrote: »
    I see what Shoggoth and Disturbed are saying. On the one hand, there is little reason to deviate from the way Moore set up the character (as Shoggoth points out). On the other hand, it is hard to instill in the audience just how otherwordly Doc is without a little visual enhancement. In the graphic novel, we can read Doc's thoughts and thus get a sense of just how disconnected he is. In a movie, we won't get that kind of characterization. The impact has to come another way, and maybe that way should be visual.


    Exactly
    Um..they could just...do a voice over?

    DasUberEdward on
  • Disturbed_1Disturbed_1 Registered User
    edited April 2007
    But if they did that then some people might think the story is all about him if they are hearing his thoughts.

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  • ServoServo Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited April 2007
    the story WOULD be about him, then

    unless you had several different voice overs

    and that worked out so well for dune

    Servo on
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  • InquisitorInquisitor Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    I liked Watchmen, especiall Rorschach. He is definately one of my favorite characters of all time.

    However, I couldn't stand the whole pirate story from that comic book the kid was reading that would run along the story sometimes. I get what they were going for, but I really had to force myself to read through those parts and not just skip them.

    Inquisitor on
  • HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User
    edited April 2007
    You'd really only need a voiceover for the overview of his history, and that could be presented in the form of him recounting his origin for Silk Spectre or on a television interview.

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  • edited April 2007
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I liked Watchmen, especiall Rorschach. He is definately one of my favorite characters of all time.

    However, I couldn't stand the whole pirate story from that comic book the kid was reading that would run along the story sometimes. I get what they were going for, but I really had to force myself to read through those parts and not just skip them.

    Really? The Black Freighter comic and all the pirate stuff were some of my favorite things about Watchmen, and one of the things I fear will make just a tiny cameo in the movie.

    Menace on
    Don't try to talk to me like you're somebody.

    You aren't shit to me.

    Got that?
  • ShoggothShoggoth Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Briareos wrote: »
    I see what Shoggoth and Disturbed are saying. On the one hand, there is little reason to deviate from the way Moore set up the character (as Shoggoth points out). On the other hand, it is hard to instill in the audience just how otherwordly Doc is without a little visual enhancement. In the graphic novel, we can read Doc's thoughts and thus get a sense of just how disconnected he is. In a movie, we won't get that kind of characterization. The impact has to come another way, and maybe that way should be visual.

    I agree that something more than just blue paint needs to be done. I'd honestly like to see something as simple as the actor being colorized with CGI. I think there's a lot of subtle things you can do to make him seem otherworldly without making it too ornamented. His eyes should be all white, and that does a bit. I think the actor can do a lot just by altering his body movements to seem less natural and more static/inhuman. I'd just really love to see something nice and subtle, all just my opinion.

    Menace wrote: »
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I liked Watchmen, especially Rorschach. He is definately one of my favorite characters of all time.

    However, I couldn't stand the whole pirate story from that comic book the kid was reading that would run along the story sometimes. I get what they were going for, but I really had to force myself to read through those parts and not just skip them.

    Really? The Black Freighter comic and all the pirate stuff were some of my favorite things about Watchmen, and one of the things I fear will make just a tiny cameo in the movie.

    I concur, it mirrors the action so well without being out of place in the comic. I have no idea how they can pull that off in the movie. I won't be surprised if they cut almost all of it. Same with "under the hood" between issues, pretty much everything at the back of the issues I ate up.

    I fear we'll just see brief nods and references to these things in the movie, like a character says "have you read under the hood? That book sucked!" or something terrible like that.

    Shoggoth on
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  • BriareosBriareos Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Briareos wrote: »
    I see what Shoggoth and Disturbed are saying. On the one hand, there is little reason to deviate from the way Moore set up the character (as Shoggoth points out). On the other hand, it is hard to instill in the audience just how otherwordly Doc is without a little visual enhancement. In the graphic novel, we can read Doc's thoughts and thus get a sense of just how disconnected he is. In a movie, we won't get that kind of characterization. The impact has to come another way, and maybe that way should be visual.


    Exactly
    Um..they could just...do a voice over?

    Narration in a movie is like walking on thin ice. Directors try to avoid it, because it is a risky story device. How many movies have you seen with good narration? I can think of one off the top of my head: Good Fellas. But I know I've seen a lot of movies with narration.

    Briareos on
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  • InquisitorInquisitor Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Briareos wrote: »
    Briareos wrote: »
    I see what Shoggoth and Disturbed are saying. On the one hand, there is little reason to deviate from the way Moore set up the character (as Shoggoth points out). On the other hand, it is hard to instill in the audience just how otherwordly Doc is without a little visual enhancement. In the graphic novel, we can read Doc's thoughts and thus get a sense of just how disconnected he is. In a movie, we won't get that kind of characterization. The impact has to come another way, and maybe that way should be visual.


    Exactly
    Um..they could just...do a voice over?

    Narration in a movie is like walking on thin ice. Directors try to avoid it, because it is a risky story device. How many movies have you seen with good narration? I can think of one off the top of my head: Good Fellas. But I know I've seen a lot of movies with narration.

    Fight club had good narration aswell. I'm sure there are more but yes, for the most part directors stray away from narration.

    As for the Black Freighter stuff. I dunno, it just felt so heavy handed to me, like they were brow-beating me with what was going on. I did like the stuff at the back of the issues when it delt with characters I liked.

    Inquisitor on
  • DasUberEdwardDasUberEdward Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Briareos wrote: »
    Briareos wrote: »
    I see what Shoggoth and Disturbed are saying. On the one hand, there is little reason to deviate from the way Moore set up the character (as Shoggoth points out). On the other hand, it is hard to instill in the audience just how otherwordly Doc is without a little visual enhancement. In the graphic novel, we can read Doc's thoughts and thus get a sense of just how disconnected he is. In a movie, we won't get that kind of characterization. The impact has to come another way, and maybe that way should be visual.


    Exactly
    Um..they could just...do a voice over?

    Narration in a movie is like walking on thin ice. Directors try to avoid it, because it is a risky story device. How many movies have you seen with good narration? I can think of one off the top of my head: Good Fellas. But I know I've seen a lot of movies with narration.
    Sin City did a good job of detailing character thoughts.

    DasUberEdward on
  • BitstreamBitstream Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Briareos wrote: »
    Briareos wrote: »
    I see what Shoggoth and Disturbed are saying. On the one hand, there is little reason to deviate from the way Moore set up the character (as Shoggoth points out). On the other hand, it is hard to instill in the audience just how otherwordly Doc is without a little visual enhancement. In the graphic novel, we can read Doc's thoughts and thus get a sense of just how disconnected he is. In a movie, we won't get that kind of characterization. The impact has to come another way, and maybe that way should be visual.


    Exactly
    Um..they could just...do a voice over?

    Narration in a movie is like walking on thin ice. Directors try to avoid it, because it is a risky story device. How many movies have you seen with good narration? I can think of one off the top of my head: Good Fellas. But I know I've seen a lot of movies with narration.
    Sin City did a good job of detailing character thoughts.
    Yeah, comic book movies get a lot more leeway when it comes to techniques considered cheesy in normal film. You go to a movie about superheroes, and you know it won't follow normal conventions.

    Bitstream on
  • HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Sin City wasn't a superhero film. Most people probably thought it was black and white because it was retro.

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  • BitstreamBitstream Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Two things.

    A. You know what I meant. I suppose I could have said "a movie about superheroes or gritty over-the-top hard-boiled noir cops and disfigured bad guys", but I didn't think it was necessary.

    B. You're really not giving people credit. Every damn ad for Sin City said BASED ON THE HIT COMIC BOOK, and I imagine most people who went to it knew what they were getting into.

    This is a really ridiculous thing to argue about. I need my book back to distract me :(

    Bitstream on
  • MugginsMuggins Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    So guys... Gerard Butler as The Comedian.

    Muggins on
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  • jkylefultonjkylefulton Squid...or Kid? NNID - majpellRegistered User regular
    edited April 2007
    On the way down, Butler can scream "THAT'S THE SIDEWAAAAALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK!!!!!"

    jkylefulton on
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  • Disturbed_1Disturbed_1 Registered User
    edited April 2007
    The guy from 300? Huh.....That might work.

    Disturbed_1 on
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  • MugginsMuggins Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Also:

    oshitmarscopy.jpg

    Muggins on
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  • Disturbed_1Disturbed_1 Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Ya that was a really cool part.

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  • PhonehandPhonehand Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    I think the easiest way to solve all of these problems is simply don't make the movie what the hell is wrong with everyone this should not be made

    Phonehand on
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  • Disturbed_1Disturbed_1 Registered User
    edited April 2007
    I think it should be made. Just be written and directed by Alan moore.

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  • BitstreamBitstream Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Oh god no. It would turn into another Hitchhiker's Guide movie, where the creator would want it done perfectly and the thing wouldn't be made until he died and got out of the way. I'd rather have a good established director take it up, and actually have a chance of getting a good movie now as opposed to a made-by-committee mediocre thing twenty years from now.

    Bitstream on
  • EchoEcho Moderator mod
    edited April 2007
    I think it should be made. Just be written and directed by Alan moore.

    He'd torch the set on day one.

    Echo on
    Echo wrote: »
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  • DJ EebsDJ Eebs Moderator, Administrator admin
    edited April 2007
    I actually really liked the hitchhiker's guide movie.

    DJ Eebs on
  • HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User
    edited April 2007
    I actually really like Zooey Deschanel.

    But yeah, it wasn't a bad film unless you were deeply attached to your conception of the characters. It'd certainly be less of an issue in the case of a comic adaptation, what with drawings of the characters right there to ensure that everyone knows what the fuck Rorschach is supposed to look like.

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  • WallhitterWallhitter Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Echo wrote: »
    I think it should be made. Just be written and directed by Alan moore.

    He'd torch the set on day one.


    And systematically slaughter the actors, as well as anyone who was related to, had met, known, or heard of them.

    Wallhitter on
  • EdcrabEdcrab Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    And then move on up to mankind. In a huge, fiery act of genocidal rage.


    I'm not sure why everything remotely popular has to have a movie adaptation these days. Anything with the Watchmen name attached to it instantly appeals to me on some level, but my mind knows there's no chance of meeting my expectations in a 2 hour film with a limited budget.

    It'd just be a reimagining of a franchise that'd probably piss me off no end. It's odd- V for Vendetta wasn't actually all that bad when considered as a movie (especially as a few friends had informed me it was pure crap in a bottle), but when considered as an adaptation of the comic it stumbled.

    Thing is, I think my fanboyism for Watchmen is on a much higher level...

    Edcrab on
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  • BriareosBriareos Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Edcrab wrote: »
    I'm not sure why everything remotely popular has to have a movie adaptation these days.

    Oh oh oh! I know this one! Because someone thinks they can make some money off it!

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  • VirralVirral Registered User
    edited April 2007
    I enjoyed V for Vendetta a fair bit, but have never read the comic so perhaps that worked in my favour :)

    Virral on
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  • Disturbed_1Disturbed_1 Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Weellll I know what it needs. A group of directors to work together. And they should all be somewhat good. Of course it is hollywood and that would never happen.

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  • ShoggothShoggoth Registered User
    edited April 2007
    Phonehand wrote: »
    I think the easiest way to solve all of these problems is simply don't make the movie what the hell is wrong with everyone this should not be made

    I concur with this man.

    Shoggoth on
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  • TurkeyTurkey TampaRegistered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Virral wrote: »
    I enjoyed V for Vendetta a fair bit, but have never read the comic so perhaps that worked in my favour :)

    I loved V for Vendetta because it introduced me to Alan Moore's works.

    Turkey on
  • VirralVirral Registered User
    edited April 2007
    The only thing of Alan Moore's I've read, and I use the term lightly, is From Hell. I found it completely impossible to read and enjoy, because I couldn't work out what the hell was going on. All the characters looked the same to me, and noone was being properly introduced, so I actually went through a fair part of it thinking two separate guys were the same guy and another guy was actually two people (I think he was being shown before and after, but of course that was impossible to confirm since I couldn't follow the story).

    Blegh! It put me right off Alan Moore, that's for sure. But based on reading this conversation, I'll probably check out Watchmen since it sounds good and pretty much everyone seems to enjoy it.

    Virral on
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  • durandal4532durandal4532 Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Actually, his novel is really good, too. Voice of the Fire. It's got a terribly hard to read beginning, but was really engaging. Also, his hometown apparently sucks really hard.

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  • Disturbed_1Disturbed_1 Registered User
    edited April 2007
    When did from Hell Come out?

    Disturbed_1 on
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  • Red or AliveRed or Alive Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Virral wrote: »
    The only thing of Alan Moore's I've read, and I use the term lightly, is From Hell. I found it completely impossible to read and enjoy, because I couldn't work out what the hell was going on. All the characters looked the same to me, and noone was being properly introduced, so I actually went through a fair part of it thinking two separate guys were the same guy and another guy was actually two people (I think he was being shown before and after, but of course that was impossible to confirm since I couldn't follow the story).

    Blegh! It put me right off Alan Moore, that's for sure. But based on reading this conversation, I'll probably check out Watchmen since it sounds good and pretty much everyone seems to enjoy it.

    As I've managed to state in pretty much every thread I've posted in (in this forum) From Hell is my favourite comic. Quite possibly my favourite book, including prose. It's dense, layered, steeped in Moore's gnostic viewpoint but never preachy or misjudged. Twenty pages of annotations gives it a sort of historical verisimilitude which, combined with a heartbreaking epilogue that acts as a sort of lecture on the Ripper murders as both historical incident and cultural phenomenon, makes it unlike anything else in the medium.

    So, sir, I disagree with your assessment. Pistols at dawn it is. Of course, you could always try reading it again...

    (While I'm here; though I do agree Eddie Campbell's art can require a little time for the reader to adjust to, the story's pretty clear. I mean, the back of the book provides annotations to almost every page. The Ripper's identity is revealed at the end of the second chapter and the pacing is pretty steady until the end, where things go a little crazy (though this is intentional and works within the context of the story). And everyone, from Prince Eddie and Walter Sickert, to Abberline, to the prostitutes are all given chapters of their own to introduce themselves. The main cast also look pretty different from each other. Hell, I'd argue they look completely different. I really do think you're being a little unfair.)

    EDIT: Voice of the Fire is quite excellent, though I'd go as far as to say that the first chapter is quite obnoxious (even if I can understand the value of a little experimentation in modern fiction).

    EDIT 2: FH was first serialised in 1991, and initially collected in its entirety in 1999.

    Red or Alive on
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