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The Tragic Death of the Western [Anime Industry]

JintorJintor Registered User regular
edited May 2010 in Debate and/or Discourse
So the Anime thread was closed a while back for being really, really creepy. But I kind of want to talk about anime still. That said, I don't actively follow anime really anymore (the new season of K-On I'll probably follow, just so I can turn my brain off for a while), but I do follow the anime world, or fandom, and of course its commercial counterparts, the business of anime. So let's, you know, talk about that, and hope desperately I don't get infraction'd for doing so.

So Bang! Zoom! President Eric Sherman recently posted something up on his blog claiming that Anime in the west is going to wither and die due to piracy.
You must have noticed by now that many of the publishers that brought anime to the West have been shut down or substantially down-sized. There are only a few places left still able to bring titles to our shores. This is a critical year for anime. There’s no other way to say it. And I realized this morning that it was time for me to sound an urgent alarm.

If people don’t resist the urge to get their fix illegally, the entire industry is about to fizzle out. It won’t be a big dramatic change at this point. Last year we saw Bandai fire 90% of their staff on one Monday in January, and two years ago we saw Geneon (neé Pioneer) shut their doors and auction off their wares to the highest bidder. CPM died a slow, painful death. And ADV fell hard and fast, the way mighty giants will. But from here on, it won’t be so exciting. Japan is already suffering and struggling to bring out quality titles. They can’t rely on everything being picked up by US distributors anymore. And little by little, it just won’t be here anymore.

You can’t find much anime at Best Buy now. In fact, where can you find it for sale? Think about that. There are fewer new titles coming out, and less and less stuff will be in English, because it’s just not worth the cost of dubbing it. It’s true that entertainment distribution models are going to be changing dramatically. DVD may be on the way out forever, and online TV is becoming a reality very quickly. But so far, there are no successful ways to monetize online entertainment. Not so that creators can afford to produce and distribute quality content.

Anime is going to die.

Unless YOU change. Right now. Stop stealing. If you have committed theft, robbery, shop-lifting, or just “downloading some stuff through torrent reactor,” then just stop doing it — now. You probably wouldn’t go into a supermarket and put a package of swiss cheese under your shirt and walk out without paying. Nor would you walk into Best Buy and try to walk out with Guitar Hero, bypassing the cash register. Why? Is it because you might get caught? Or are there other issues, such as standards of morality, that dictate how you live your life.

[Link here]

Now on some level I think he does have a point, but it's the same point that anybody does in regards to piracy. Piracy definitely damages the industry, especially one as fragile and somewhat superfluous as the western dubbing industry/western anime distribution industry. But it's definitely not the only reason for the screaming and the gnashing of teeth of a whole bunch of western anime distributors. Oversaturation. Overpricing. Selling any old crap that comes in fresh from Japan. The big one is probably convenience - almost no publishers (except for Kadokawa and Funimation, I believe) offer stuff like same-day translation for the western market, probably because it's simply not as profitable or profitable at all to cater to us.

Personally, I just think we're seeing a fallback. Anime in the west over-extended its reach, over-estimated its ability to bring new audiences to the table and to profit from existing ones. Now it's got to figure out a way to become profitable again without alienating half its userbase via the morality police. Unfortunately this fallback means people being fired and shows not being brought over from Japan, but them's the bricks. I do believe that in general, anime fans have an enormous sense of entitlement (this may stem from the anime industry in the west's roots being based almost solely on piracy) and that, to some extent, they are part of the problem. But hey, let's talk it out.

/edit You can watch anime LEGIT for free (i.e. ad-supported) at Hulu, Funimation, Cartoon Network, Crunchyroll, a rental service, iTunes, etc etc etc. Some of those may only apply within the US of A. Props to Incenjucar.

Jintor on
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Posts

  • DragonPupDragonPup Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    AnimeNewsNetwork's podcast* had an interview with Eric Sherman just a week or two ago. It's a good listen and help clarify his points.


    *ANN has perhaps the best anime-related podcast there is from an industry standpoint, too. (Heat Guy J)

    DragonPup on
    "I was there, I was there, the day Horus slew the Emperor." -Cpt Garviel Loken

    Currently painting: Slowly [flickr]
  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck the search for the means to put an end to things an end to speech is what enables the discourse to continue ~ * ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) excelsior * ~Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I just don't see how the distributors here can compete with an audience that is primarily internet-based and used to getting their anime from speedsubbing groups practically the day it is released. They just aren't selling what people want :/

    surrealitycheck on
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  • LanlaornLanlaorn Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    By piracy is he referring to fansubs? People download those because there isn't any other form of that anime, they air it on TV in Japan and I either watch the fansub almost immediately after it airs or wait years for it to be available in the US in some legal format.

    I mean, I started watchinig Bleach because I saw the first few dubbed episodes on Adult Swm (friends had told me about it earlier but it had always sounded dumb, now it's my guilty pleasure lol), but they had dubbed one season and the show at that time was up to like, episode 140, so fansubs to the rescue.

    How are anime DVD sales any different from movie DVD sales? People could just download movies but they buy DVDs because it's nice to collect them. For me, fansubs are the way I see an anime "in the theater", lots of stuff isn't on TV. I've definitely bought box sets of several beloved anime series despite having them already on my hard drive, so uh yea?

    I just don't understand what he's arguing because as far as I can tell, downloading fansubs is the ONLY avenue of exposure for most anime series, is he expecting people to buy entire series on DVD based on the box art?

    Lanlaorn on
  • kdrudykdrudy Registered User
    edited May 2010
    Part of the problems starts in Japan too. The Japanese companies have such a sweet deal with their fans paying ridiculous prices that it can be hard to license something for a competitive price in the West.

    Also, one company you can say seems to do well for themselves right now is Funimation. The big reason for that is they get their shows on television. They've just started selling yet another set of DBZ DVDs, that's like 3 or 4 different sets since they've started doing DVDs for that show. I have to assume the money they make from DBZ due to it having been on television helps them do a lot more then anyone else. I'd guess it is similar at Viz with Naruto though they don't seem to be quite as ubiquitous as Funi.

    kdrudy on
    tvsfrank.jpg
  • blkmageblkmage Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    The only way I can see them staying in business is to come up with a way to make streaming shows with minimal delay from time of airing and basically treat streams like TV, using it as a way to entice people to drop monies on DVDs.

    blkmage on
  • redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Meh... aren't their more than a few anime distributors that are doing 1 or so week delayed subtitled anime? Hulu, crunchyroll, whatever.

    I like anime. A couple of times a year, I like an anime so much I'll pay money for it. That's about how I feel about western tv and movies as well. As a cheapass, lazy, American I feel TV really ought to be ad supported. It's a business model that suites the media and market. Overpriced, feature light DVDs released months or years after the initial run that add nothing to the viewing experience really just does not seem like something that is going to work.

    So, this article urges us to support a failing business model in the hope that somehow the whole nature of the US media consumption model will change. That seems unlikely to me. I could agree with a call for people to watch legitimate anime through ad supported streaming sites. This would help demonstrate the viability of a new model to IP holders and the advertisers, which will hopefully illustrate that it can be a successful model for US distribution(in combination with licensing with US networks and some localized DVD sales). or whatever.

    redx on
    This machine kills threads.
  • LanlaornLanlaorn Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    The only way I can see them staying in business is to come up with a way to make streaming shows with minimal delay from time of airing and basically treat streams like TV, using it as a way to entice people to drop monies on DVDs.

    Ok but this is exactly what is happening right now by fans, except via torrent rather than streaming, and it does entice people to drop cash on DVDs (or at least, it does for me). As far as I can tell it's the piracy that the editorial in the OP is referring to. I wouldn't expect piracy of DVDs themselves to hurt anime any more than it does movies or live TV (i.e. it cuts into profits some, but far from "killing" them).
    Overpriced, feature light DVDs released months or years after the initial run that add nothing to the viewing experience really just does not seem like something that is going to work.

    While I agree that it won't work as the initial medium by which you expect people to watch your series, this sort of thing sells for shows people love. I don't need features or anything adding to the view experience to entice me to buy the Farscape DVDs, I just loved that show and wanted those DVDs. It's the same reason I have the Cowboy Bebop DVDs, but I saw Cowboy Bebop on TV (Adult Swim again) so...

    The problem definitely is their lack of "regular" exposure before they expect people to buy shit. There's the anime channel that some cable providers have and a couple hours on cartoon network, and that's it.

    Lanlaorn on
  • kdrudykdrudy Registered User
    edited May 2010
    To go with my point about television, the Amazon bestseller list for anime :http://www.amazon.com/gp/bestsellers/dvd/517956/ref=pd_mw_d_mte

    In the top 25 the 13 series DVD/Blu-Rays present have all aired on television. Most of the rest are Miyazaki movies. In fact in the top 100 overall there are only 10 series DVD/Blu-Rays that have not aired on television.

    kdrudy on
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  • DragonPupDragonPup Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Lanlaorn wrote: »
    By piracy is he referring to fansubs?

    In the ANN Podcast, he specifies he is not talking about fansubs as it is being released. He's talking about people who take the R1 DVD rip it, and stick it up on a torrent.

    DragonPup on
    "I was there, I was there, the day Horus slew the Emperor." -Cpt Garviel Loken

    Currently painting: Slowly [flickr]
  • blkmageblkmage Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Lanlaorn wrote: »
    The only way I can see them staying in business is to come up with a way to make streaming shows with minimal delay from time of airing and basically treat streams like TV, using it as a way to entice people to drop monies on DVDs.

    Ok but this is exactly what is happening right now by fans, except via torrent rather than streaming, and it does entice people to drop cash on DVDs (or at least, it does for me). As far as I can tell it's the piracy that the editorial in the OP is referring to. I wouldn't expect piracy of DVDs themselves to hurt anime any more than it does movies or live TV (i.e. it cuts into profits some, but far from "killing" them).
    Yeah, that's what's happening, but obviously the distributors are not pleased with this arrangement. They would like for everyone to stop watching fansubs and to only buy DVDs and that seems to be what the editorial is pushing everyone to do. Obviously, that's not realistic and if the industry really wants to discourage the use of fansubs, then they'll have to start and try to actually compete with them.

    blkmage on
  • LanlaornLanlaorn Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    In the ANN Podcast, he specifies he is not talking about fansubs as it is being released. He's talking about people who take the R1 DVD rip it, and stick it up on a torrent.

    Why would this hurt anime more than any other medium? It's far easier to download a DVD rip of The Dark Knight but people want that sitting on their shelves

    Lanlaorn on
  • DragonPupDragonPup Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Lanlaorn wrote: »
    In the ANN Podcast, he specifies he is not talking about fansubs as it is being released. He's talking about people who take the R1 DVD rip it, and stick it up on a torrent.

    Why would this hurt anime more than any other medium? It's far easier to download a DVD rip of The Dark Knight but people want that sitting on their shelves

    Dark Knight is going to sell a million plus units easily on DVD/bluray. Most anime probably doesn't sell 1/20th of that. In a small niche industry losing a few thousand units to piracy hurts far worse. Also, with a more tech savvy viewership, they know more about torrents and the like than the average movie consumer.

    DragonPup on
    "I was there, I was there, the day Horus slew the Emperor." -Cpt Garviel Loken

    Currently painting: Slowly [flickr]
  • JarsJars Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I watch the subtitles bleach episodes on hulu, but they are only up to episode 126. I remember seeing there being over 200 episodes of the anime so it's really far behind once I finish up these.

    Jars on
  • cloudeaglecloudeagle Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Piracy's only part of it. There's also the fact that the Japanese industry is struggling. Someone on this board also made the point that, after years of anime being awesome and new, the U.S. audience has grown tired of the same old cliches in many shows and are becoming more demanding.

    It's really a triple whammy. Quadruple if you count the recession.

    cloudeagle on
    Switch: 3947-4890-9293
  • Donkey KongDonkey Kong My lit AF posts will leave you shook Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    God, I hate it when people equate piracy with theft.

    It's not the same thing morally, legally or physically. A pirated episode is not a lost sale let alone lost product. In the case of anime, the pirates usually aren't even stealing your product! They're instead downloading an unlicensed, free alternative. Probably because they don't have money or they don't think the product is worth paying for.

    Anime in the west is dying because it's a niche market full of mediocre product geared towards people who don't have money.

    Donkey Kong on
    Thousands of hot, local singles are waiting to play at bubbulon.com.
  • DragonPupDragonPup Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    The moeloliblob fad is fading in Japan, and that was a big (and creepy) money maker for them.

    DragonPup on
    "I was there, I was there, the day Horus slew the Emperor." -Cpt Garviel Loken

    Currently painting: Slowly [flickr]
  • TofystedethTofystedeth veni, veneri, vamoosi Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Geneon closed!? Noooo!
    Or is it just the western branch?
    I love their stuff. My wife and I are watching The Last Exile on Netflix at the moment.
    I'd love if there were more anime on Netflix and Hulu to watch.

    Tofystedeth on
    steam_sig.png
  • DragonPupDragonPup Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    They're instead downloading an unlicensed, free alternative. Probably because they don't have money or they don't think the product is worth paying for.

    All anime is licensed by the originally Japanese companies. Don't confuse 'not licensed by a US company' with 'no one owns the rights in the US'.
    Geneon closed!? Noooo!

    GeneonUSA is closed, Bandai US doesn't seem to be going very strong at all, ADV shuttered and became Section23/Sentai Filmworks, Viz just laid off 40% of their staff, and MediaBlasters laid off like 25% earlier in the year. Funimation rescued a lot of licenses from Geneon(including Last Exile, Black Lagoon, and FLCL).

    DragonPup on
    "I was there, I was there, the day Horus slew the Emperor." -Cpt Garviel Loken

    Currently painting: Slowly [flickr]
  • blkmageblkmage Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    DragonPup wrote: »
    The moeloliblob fad is fading in Japan, and that was a big (and creepy) money maker for them.
    Eh, they'll eventually find some other fad to pander to, whether it's giant robots or moeblobs or whatever.

    blkmage on
  • BiopticBioptic Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    kdrudy wrote: »
    To go with my point about television, the Amazon bestseller list for anime :http://www.amazon.com/gp/bestsellers/dvd/517956/ref=pd_mw_d_mte

    In the top 25 the 13 series DVD/Blu-Rays present have all aired on television. Most of the rest are Miyazaki movies. In fact in the top 100 overall there are only 10 series DVD/Blu-Rays that have not aired on television.

    In the UK, very little anime ever gets shown on TV - and when it does, it's on subscription channels with a vastly reduced viewership and heavily skewed towards the younger end of the market. The anime that sells has either been 1) exposed to the mass market in some form (a la Gibhli), or 2) is much cheaper than other anime. I spoke to the head of ADV UK a few months after it died, and he was principally lamenting the utter inflexibility that Japanese companies show towards competitive pricing - their attitude seems to be "If they don't respect our work and aren't willing to pay top-dollar for it, then they don't deserve it".

    Frequently, these companies also demand that you license properties in bulk - if you want to get the currently hot series, then you have to buy several other crap ones as well - and still sell them in 7 volumes costing £20 each! Ironically, these low-grade mecha shows and the like sometimes prove to be bestsellers purely because the licensors sometimes relent and allow them to be sold a bit more cheaply...which in turn convinces the licensors that there's more demand for this rubbish.

    I have however noticed a new label cropping up on Amazon: 'Anime Legends', selling well-regarded series like Wolf's Rain, Haruhi and Eureka 7 for a very competitive price - £15 for 26 eps (or 13 for Haruhi). Anybody heard anything about the label, or is it UK-only?

    Bioptic on
  • Donkey KongDonkey Kong My lit AF posts will leave you shook Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    DragonPup wrote: »
    They're instead downloading an unlicensed, free alternative. Probably because they don't have money or they don't think the product is worth paying for.

    All anime is licensed by the originally Japanese companies. Don't confuse 'not licensed by a US company' with 'no one owns the rights in the US'.

    Unlicensed as in general copyright, not just in the way that it's used by the subbing community.

    Donkey Kong on
    Thousands of hot, local singles are waiting to play at bubbulon.com.
  • PataPata Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    If anything's going to kill anime it's the retardation of the anime companies.

    They don't beleive in silly things like "supply and demand" and charge an arm and a leg for a two episode disc of a show, (and your first born for an HD disc) undercut western licencers because otherwise there would be massive importing from Japan.

    Unwilling to change their business model, they instead start focusing on a narrower and narrower niche that can pay the rediculous prices they demand.

    Pata on
    SRWWSig.pngEpisode 5: Mecha-World, Mecha-nisim, Mecha-beasts
  • DragonPupDragonPup Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Anime Legends is a subset of Bandai.

    DragonPup on
    "I was there, I was there, the day Horus slew the Emperor." -Cpt Garviel Loken

    Currently painting: Slowly [flickr]
  • CantidoCantido Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    IF I CATCH YOU DOWNLOADING THIS GAME, ARAKUNE WILL RAIN DOWN YOUR THROAT WITH HOT ACID AND DISSOLVE YOUR TESTICLES AND TURN YOUR GUTS INTO BEES
    *BEEEEEEEEEEEESSSS*
    THIS IS A COPYRIGHTED GAME FROM AKSYS! IF I FIND YOU CREATED A TORRENT, I'LL BREAK INTO YOUR HOUSE AND DEVOUR YOUR BODY AND SOUL!
    *Guitar Solo*

    I had to turn my brain off hard to enjoy Rosario Vampire. Shit, I think that was my first harem show. Every time those supernatural ladies were fighting over him I kept thinking "Bitches call me Gandalf" from a certain song. But if that were an American show, Moka would be all "wanna make out?" and he'd say "okay" and the show would still be less creepy with the panty shots gone.

    I own just one anime, FLCL. And there's a Blu Ray in the works, and I will buy it fierce. If I were to purchase shows, it would have to be Gurren Lagann, Death Note (I only own the two movies) and Cowboy Bebop. I can't picture myself buying anything new.

    Cantido on
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  • LanlaornLanlaorn Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I have however noticed a new label cropping up on Amazon: 'Anime Legends', selling well-regarded series like Wolf's Rain, Haruhi and Eureka 7 for a very competitive price - £15 for 26 eps (or 13 for Haruhi). Anybody heard anything about the label, or is it UK-only?

    Definitely available in the US, I see them on Amazon and in brick and mortar stores in NYC, and for the record the "Anime Legends" box for Cowboy Bebop is gorgeous.

    Lanlaorn on
  • kaleeditykaleedity Sometimes science is more art than science Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Seriously, $50-60 for the equivalent of three 30m tv episodes

    this is what they're charging.

    kaleedity on
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Pata wrote: »
    If anything's going to kill anime it's the retardation of the anime companies.

    They don't beleive in silly things like "supply and demand" and charge an arm and a leg for a two episode disc of a show, (and your first born for an HD disc) undercut western licencers because otherwise there would be massive importing from Japan.

    Unwilling to change their business model, they instead start focusing on a narrower and narrower niche that can pay the rediculous prices they demand.

    That's due to the monument of stupid that is the Japanese market. Read Debito's articles about building a house in Hokkaido - when it's both cheaper and results in better product to import building components from the US, you know there's a problem.

    AngelHedgie on
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  • PataPata Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    kaleedity wrote: »
    Seriously, $50-60 for the equivalent of three 30m tv episodes

    this is what they're charging.

    In comparison, The entire first season of Avatar: The Last Airbender.

    Pata on
    SRWWSig.pngEpisode 5: Mecha-World, Mecha-nisim, Mecha-beasts
  • CantidoCantido Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Pata wrote: »
    kaleedity wrote: »
    Seriously, $50-60 for the equivalent of three 30m tv episodes

    this is what they're charging.

    In comparison, The entire first season of Avatar: The Last Airbender.

    Huey and Riley also say hello.

    I remember spending 75 dollars on Fooly Cooly at the time. That would no longer fly with me now.

    Cantido on
    3DS Friendcode 5413-1311-3767
  • SlicerSlicer Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Pata wrote: »
    If anything's going to kill anime it's the retardation of the anime companies.

    They don't beleive in silly things like "supply and demand" and charge an arm and a leg for a two episode disc of a show, (and your first born for an HD disc) undercut western licencers because otherwise there would be massive importing from Japan.

    Unwilling to change their business model, they instead start focusing on a narrower and narrower niche that can pay the rediculous prices they demand.

    Gonna nitpick here and say that charging a high price to a dedicated niche is still following the laws of supply and demand, even if it might not be the most efficient or profitable plan.

    Slicer on
  • Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    One thing that might help is if they don't bother dubbing anime. The last anime DVDs I bought were the subtitled-only ones for Gurren Lagann. Each one had 8 episodes for 20 bucks; I consider that a good deal.

    Especially compared to other series, which charge 20 bucks for less than half the amount of content.

    Hexmage-PA on
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  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    You know, I was wondering why I hadn't seen the anime thread in a while.

    And now, I'm kind of curious as to what was so creepy out it.

    On the funny note of ridiculous charging practices for distribution companies, apparently DVD sets for Dominion Tank Police and New Dominion Tank Police range from about $70 to $150 online, pretty consistently. For the US release anyway.

    And for some strange reason, the UK release can be had for $7 to $10 dollars. The difference is more than enough to buy a region free DVD player (though I'm lucky, my Xbox 360 plays UK DVDs, unlike my PS3).

    Bizarre.

    EDIT: This, of course, has more to do with being out of print than anything, but what is bizarre is that it only effects the US release.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Cantido wrote: »
    Pata wrote: »
    kaleedity wrote: »
    Seriously, $50-60 for the equivalent of three 30m tv episodes

    this is what they're charging.

    In comparison, The entire first season of Avatar: The Last Airbender.

    Huey and Riley also say hello.

    I remember spending 75 dollars on Fooly Cooly at the time. That would no longer fly with me now.

    Its not anime, but Doctor Who DVDs go for 90 dollars! Why do they have to charge such an exorbitant price? I'd rather just get the episodes I want on iTunes (and I do).

    Could they not release anime on iTunes?

    Hexmage-PA on
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  • Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Synthesis wrote: »
    You know, I was wondering why I hadn't seen the anime thread in a while.

    And now, I'm kind of curious as to what was so creepy out it.
    PA Mod wrote:
    I'm sorry, but the OP alone has animated frames of a child eating a woman's breast and another cartoon of a woman getting a breast massage. The rest of this thread has routine and sometime illustrated references to "lolicon" and various other forms of depravity. While I understand that this is typical and perhaps routine in the style of japanese cartoon that this thread is dedicated to, it is neither acceptable nor appropriate to the Penny Arcade website nor the D&D forum. We have many people who check into this forum from work, and if seen by their employer, this kind of content could get people fired.

    Maybe the Anime community in this forum isn't really mature enough to discuss their entertainment appropriately in D&D, or else perhaps anime isn't an appropriate topic to the D&D forums. In either case, a cooling-off period is in order, and the D&D anime thread will be shut down until further notice.

    Hexmage-PA on
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  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    On the other end of the scale, 26 episodes of Serei no Moribito were on sale at Wal-Mart for $29.

    Why only Wal-Mart, I'm not sure. They came in a crappy case, but the DVDs themselves were fine.

    EDIT: Wow. That's pretty bad. My only consolation is that somewhere, 15 pages before that happened (I'm ballparking the figure) I warned something like this would happen.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • SlicerSlicer Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    One thing that might help is if they don't bother dubbing anime. The last anime DVDs I bought were the subtitled-only ones for Gurren Lagann. Each one had 8 episodes for 20 bucks; I consider that a good deal.

    Especially compared to other series, which charge 20 bucks for less than half the amount of content.

    Sub only DVDs have a record of selling less than those with dubs. Which is why most sub only DVDs nowadays seem to be for fairly niche titles (such as older titles without much of a fanbase in the west). The GL DVDs that were sub only were a different case I suspect, in that it was a company wanting to capitalize on something that was popular on the internet as soon as possible.

    Slicer on
  • cloudeaglecloudeagle Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Pata wrote: »
    kaleedity wrote: »
    Seriously, $50-60 for the equivalent of three 30m tv episodes

    this is what they're charging.

    In comparison, The entire first season of Avatar: The Last Airbender.

    And keep in mind that compilation was just released.

    I know it's not anime, but goddamn is it a great show and $26 bucks for the first season is a steal.

    cloudeagle on
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  • Irond WillIrond Will WARNING: NO HURTFUL COMMENTS, PLEASE!!!!! Cambridge. MAModerator mod
    edited May 2010
    So

    keep this thread on the topic of the economics and business of anime or animation and we will all be fine here

    cool?

    Irond Will on
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  • Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    So I guess its plain to see that the whole industry's business model is severely flawed. Seriously, they're asking us to pay $20-$30 for three or four episodes of a show that we've never seen before that came out in Japan a year or more ago (and god knows how long the show is and how many DVDs you'll have to purchase for the complete set).

    I watched several of the new shows in Japan, and am now a fan of B-Gata H-Kei (B-Cup Sex Maniac). If it weren't for the fact that I could watch an episode of this show for free online, there would be no way in hell that I would ever see it. If I were to see a DVD labeled "B-Cup Sex Maniac" in Best Buy, I most likely would have no interest in it (I'd also probably think it was a hentai). Even if I was interested, I doubt I'd want to pay $20 just to see what it's like. Even if I was willing to pay $20 to watch something I'd never even heard of before, I doubt I'd be willing to take a DVD titled "B-Cup Sex Maniac" to the counter.

    I'd miss out on a hilarious show that, surprisingly, contains much less fan service than a typical anime.

    Hexmage-PA on
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  • B:LB:L Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Lanlaorn wrote: »
    I have however noticed a new label cropping up on Amazon: 'Anime Legends', selling well-regarded series like Wolf's Rain, Haruhi and Eureka 7 for a very competitive price - £15 for 26 eps (or 13 for Haruhi). Anybody heard anything about the label, or is it UK-only?

    Definitely available in the US, I see them on Amazon and in brick and mortar stores in NYC, and for the record the "Anime Legends" box for Cowboy Bebop is gorgeous.
    Anime Legends, The Viridian Collection, and Anime S.A.V.E. are all great bargain collections.

    B:L on
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