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Troubleshooting my first self-built PC (no video)

ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
Whoooo here we go!

I just built my first computer and I can't get any video off of it. The mobo is a Gigabyte GA-785GMT, and I'm using its' integrated graphics with an HDMI cable going into my TV. I turn the computer on, and nothing. Black screen of confusion.

No system beeps either, if that means anything at this point in time.

edit: My mobo has an ATX 12v 2x4 connector and an ATX connector. My PSU is only plugged into the ATX connector, I can't find anyway to plug it into the ATX 12v 2x4 but the user manual says
If the 12V power connector is not connected, the computer will not start.

Is this in any way related?

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Posts

  • TetraNitroCubaneTetraNitroCubane The Djinnerator At the bottom of a bottleRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    You'll need to plug the 12v 2x4 ATX in from your PSU into the motherboard in order to get things to work right. When you say that you can't find a way to plug it in, do you mean you can't find the port on the motherboard? I was only able to find a smallish picture of your mobo, but the red circle should specify where you need to plug in the ATX 12v 2x4 connector.

    ifv98k.jpg

    Edit: If you mean that you can't find a way to get the PSU to plug into the motherboard because the PSU doesn't have the appropriate cable, that's very odd. In this case, either you're using a severely outdated PSU, or a modular one that's lacking an additional cable needed to plug in to the 12v 2x4 port. Did your PSU perhaps come with some kind of adapter, if this is the case?

    If it still doesn't POST after getting all the power connectors secured in their proper locations, ensure you've got all the standoffs in the case, and that the motherboard isn't shorting out on the back. Hope this helps, and congrats on getting your first system built! It's worth it, even with little roadbumps like this.

    TetraNitroCubane on
    VuIBhrs.png
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Here is the plug going into my ATX connector.
    img1437d.jpg
    Notice a 2x2 can split off from it.


    I have another 2x2 coming from the PSU that doesn't go anywhere right now.
    img1438z.jpg
    Combined, these fit into the 12V 2x4, but the 2x2 that is fills the ATX is too short to reach the 12v 2x4. Also, this would leave a 2x2 slot empty in the ATX connector.

    There are no other plugs from the PSU that would fit in the 12V 2x4. This is the PSU that came with the In-Win BL-631 case.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811108065&Tpk=in-win%20bl-631

    edit: Also, the stand offs are built into the case and there is no adapter.

    Improvolone on
    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    So I've got that lonely 2x2, do I need to buy this to fix my problem?
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812123315
    12-123-315-TS?$S180W$

    Improvolone on
    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
  • ZxerolZxerol for the smaller pieces, my shovel wouldn't do so i took off my boot and used my shoeRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    The ATX 4-pin split-off should go into the 24-pin ATX 2.0 connector on the motherboard. The extra 2x2 plug is for the secondary power, but it looks like the PSU is outdated and doesn't provide an 8-pin EPS connector. (PSUs will provide an 8-pin connector or usually two 4-pin connectors that combine together.)

    You can try to plug in the 4-pin power into half of the secondary power connector of the motherboard and that often would be enough. Although I really recommend getting a better PSU.

    Zxerol on
  • TetraNitroCubaneTetraNitroCubane The Djinnerator At the bottom of a bottleRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Without plugging in that 8-pin and the 24-pin, your motherboard simply won't boot. I find it very perplexing that the appropriate cables aren't there on your PSU, so I think I must be missing something. Assuming it's a fairly recently made PSU it should really have something to plug into the 8-pin... Looking at the cables in this In-Win PSU review seem to show that the adapter you're indicating comes with the PSU. Maybe it just wasn't included with your case for some reason?

    As a general disclaimer: It's usually a bad idea to use the PSU that comes with a case (unless it's a well known brand). I've not heard much of In-Win, but I'm not sure I'd trust their PSU very much. Reviews on the NewEgg page you linked seem to indicate that the PSU isn't the highest quality. that review I linked to earlier wasn't impressed, either. I assume with a MicroATX form factor and a 300W PSU that you're not looking to do anything super intense, but even with those considerations I would strongly consider an alternative PSU. Even if you get it running after finding an adapter, you might be setting yourself up for pain later. Brands I typically see recommended include Antec, OCZ, PC Power and Cooling, Corsair, and Thermaltake, among some others I can't recall at the moment.

    TetraNitroCubane on
    VuIBhrs.png
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I'm sure I'll buy a better PSU in the future, but if all I need is an adapter, that's a good enough stop gap measure for me. Hell, I bought the case because its absurdly small, not because of the PSU, that was just an added "bonus".
    How would I even go about finding a PSU that fits in my case?
    A PSU dying can take out other equipment with it, right?

    Improvolone on
    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
  • TetraNitroCubaneTetraNitroCubane The Djinnerator At the bottom of a bottleRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I'm sure I'll buy a better PSU in the future, but if all I need is an adapter, that's a good enough stop gap measure for me. Hell, I bought the case because its absurdly small, not because of the PSU, that was just an added "bonus".
    How would I even go about finding a PSU that fits in my case?
    A PSU dying can take out other equipment with it, right?

    Provided that the components in your case are able to be powered with only 300W, then getting the appropriate adapter should, at least, help you to boot.

    A malfunctioning or poorly performing PSU can damage every other component in your computer, which is why those "bonus" PSUs that come with cases are never a good idea to use. This is just my personal opinion, and I know some may disagree with me, but I feel that the PSU is the most important component in any build. I've had too many disasters in the past from crappy PSUs, so these days I bite the bullet, plunk down extra money, and scour the net for reviews to ensure the PSU is quality before I purchase and install it. Again, maybe I'm just paranoid.

    As for finding a different PSU that fits your case: Most PSUs are built to ATX or MicroATX standards, and cases are as well. Sadly, looking at the NewEgg reviews of the case you purchased, it looks like you may need to do some modification to the case before a standard MicroATX PSU can fit in there. It sounds like In-Win may have tried to make it proprietary.

    TetraNitroCubane on
    VuIBhrs.png
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