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Building the Ultimate Car/Backpack emergency kit

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Posts

  • ddahcmaiddahcmai Registered User
    edited January 2011
    You definitely need a flashlight in your car, not just your pack. My timing belt broke one time in an area with no phone service 30 miles from anywhere at 10 pm in the middle of a snowstorm, and I had to hitchhike about 20 miles before I could get phone service to call a friend to pick me up. A flashlight is ideal for seeing where you're walking at night, changing a tire in the dark, or letting others see you. If I didn't have it I would have slept in my car until morning when it was safe to walk.

    ddahcmai on
  • IrukaIruka mod Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited January 2011
    added the empty gas can. Theres a flash light on both lists, under tools.

    Iruka on
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Flashlight?

    You mean MAGlite, right?

    A little rechargeable one like this, and a nice big powerful one like this big fucker.

    chrishallett83 on
  • Forbe!Forbe! regular Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Get an LED headlamp. MAGlites are cool if you're a cop, or you want to carry around something huge and love the extra weight. Plus, your hands are free.

    For your emergency flashlight I would suggest something small, like the Petzl E+Lite, which is a small back-up headlamp that runs off two watch batteries (I've used mine for 50 hours before needing to change the batteries). They are super durable and waterproof. I've washed mine and dropped it in a river before and it still worked, immediately after retrieving it. If you need to change a tire or set up a tent at night, having your hands free and not having to prop up a flashlight on whatever you're working on is helpful. On top of having your standard light, most have a highbeam, intermittent and red (some with intermittent as well). You can't go wrong with most Petzl gear.

    Forbe! on
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  • DemerdarDemerdar regular Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Get a full road atlas. I can't tell you how useful it is to have access to a detailed intricate map of each state. Google won't always be around to help ya.

    Demerdar on
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  • IrukaIruka mod Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited January 2011
    Big maglights are illegal in someplaces. I'm also a fairly small chick, so keeping the pack light is optimal. If I wanted a flashlight for self defense I'd probably get one of the small, blinding police one. A waterproof LED one sounds pretty good.

    I'll have to shop around for full road atlases, thanks for the proper term for it, Demerdar. Looking at this one on amazon, and the slightly larger one, it sounds like maybe I should go into borders or something and see if I can read the text on the smaller one.

    Iruka on
  • TalonrazorTalonrazor regular Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Ok, I am working on a massive list for you because this stuff is right up my alley. I am an Emergency Medical Technician for an emergency services patrol and a combat medic for the Army National Guard as well as a wilderness survival instructor for the Boy Scouts of America. We used to train with these kind of equipment at all times.

    I always recommend two bags: one that stays in your main car at all times and secondary bag that is dynamic.

    The dynamic bag serves as your bug-out bag and carries important stuff like datacom equipment, limited survival tools, your weapon systems, etc. The goal of this bag is to keep you alive for 72 hours while you are in motion. It also provides tools that assist you in extended survival situations. An off-the-top of my head list of vitals for a dynamic BUG bag includes:

    - MREs or lightweight dry food. Enough for two days.
    - Wire for snares, a few mousetraps as well
    - Fishing kit with lures, hooks
    - Knife. Absolutely essential. A good, strong, large knife with a saw-back.
    - Signal equipment. Whistle, mirrors, torch.
    - 9mm pistol, with extra rounds. Additionally, a collapsible .22 rifle is a godsend and great way to supply food.

    The static car bag carries warm clothing, medical kit, tow ropes, road flares, tarps, jumper kit, air compressor, wool blankets, collapsible shovels, come-alongs and more.

    Once I get a minute, heading to work now, I will draft up you a much more comprehensive list. I used to carry a massive survival bag in my car until it was broken into and all my equipment stolen. I am just now rebuilding it.

    Talonrazor on
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  • IrukaIruka mod Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited January 2011
    Talonrazor, cool! PA is a wealth of resources. I await your longer list.

    I considered fishing stuff as maybe it would be useful for something else, but as it stands I am allergic to all fish you could catch with a rod. I can eat like crawdads and crabs so a net would be okay. I'm sure fishing hooks are probably useful for other things too.

    I am still mostly opposed to a gun, and would at least take a safety course/spend time at a firing range before I even considered buying one, But I respect that it should probably be listed practically (and im sure other people will get some use from this thread.)

    What the hell is a come-along?

    Iruka on
  • bombardierbombardier mod Moderator mod
    edited January 2011
    Basically a hand-powered winch. You can use it to get your car un-stuck.

    bombardier on
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  • TalonrazorTalonrazor regular Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Iruka wrote: »
    Talonrazor, cool! PA is a wealth of resources. I await your longer list.

    I considered fishing stuff as maybe it would be useful for something else, but as it stands I am allergic to all fish you could catch with a rod. I can eat like crawdads and crabs so a net would be okay. I'm sure fishing hooks are probably useful for other things too.

    I am still mostly opposed to a gun, and would at least take a safety course/spend time at a firing range before I even considered buying one, But I respect that it should probably be listed practically (and im sure other people will get some use from this thread.)

    What the hell is a come-along?

    Come-alongs are extremely useful and I rarely see people carry them in their car, where they do a ton of good. Here is one on Amazon.

    As for the weapons, the list I am currently writing and use is a general list that covers every type of possible scenario that could happen. I DO NOT recommend carrying every item without checking local laws and regulations first. I live in Alaska, so I have very few, if any, restrictions to worry about. For those in the lower 48, interstate travel with certain items I list can get you in a big trouble. Always check your local laws and ESPECIALLY check laws governing transporting certain items across state lines. Remember though, sometimes when the shit is hitting the fan you'd rather pay a fine then be without items (there are some examples in Hurricane Katrina where this was relevant. I will post some examples as well). For those interested in firearms as survival tools, it is ESSENTIAL you understand how to use the firearm. This is more then just safety, you need to know how to do a field-strip on your weapon and put it back together. In the dark, preferable. We aren't talking about carrying weapons just because it is cool and we are rednecks. We are talking about you are having to leave your house/car because something is going on and you need a firearm with you for looting/emergencies/wildlife.

    For fishing stuff, fishing gear has a plethora of purposes besides simply fishing. I would definitely still carry some and just be mindful of allergies. If you have an epi-pen, be sure that is included as well. I would recommend taking some medical training classes. First Aid/CPR is a basic must-have but if you are serious about personal responsibility and survival, you should take a Wilderness First Responder course (called Woofer in the medtech community). This course teaches you basic trauma and medical skills in a wilderness, limited tools and option environment. Fantastic training by Wilderness Medicine Institute and great knowledge for survival and basic "oh shit" scenarios.

    I am currently at work but I am cobbling together a survival gear primer. Here are some more odds-and-ends that are extremely useful but don't make a lot of mainstay lists:

    - Gas mask. Paranoid it is not, there are a lot of times a gas mask can be extremely useful. Toxic chemical spills on the road, rioting in a city, etc.
    - 550 paracord. You should have tons of this shit on you at all times in every pack. It is extremely useful.
    - Glow sticks. Also useful
    - Tarps. Make sure to get the ones that are bright safety orange with reflective backs. These are very useful.
    - Hand-powered radio/power station. There are ones out there that also have solar panels, with the ability to charge electronic items. Very handy.
    - Pry bar. I recommend a Kar Bar Tactical tool for this but a good pry bar is really needed to escape vehicles or help someone pop a door off.
    - Axe. A good axe is pretty handy. Small hand-axes are good for BUG bags and you can get a bigger one with a hideaway saw blade for the car.
    - Extra car parts. You should carry a complete extra set of belts for your vehicle, as well as fuses, screws and bolts in addition to extra fluids like oil, brake, power steering, washer and radiator.

    Talonrazor on
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  • RynaRyna Registered User
    edited January 2011
    how about some cold hard cash?

    the emergency $20 bill I keep in my car has saved me a few times now

    Ryna on
  • tardcoretardcore regular Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Don't know if where you live gets a lot of snow but maybe a small bag of Kitty Litter for your tires?

    tardcore on
  • ErandusErandus Registered User
    edited January 2011
    Just want to stress that in the case of survival type kits, you essentially cannot pack enough fire-starting materials. Matches, lighters, flint & steel... Even pack a magnifying glass (Just the lens, sans handle to save space) which can start fires, and also be useful for removing splinters, stingers, etc, and myriad other delicate work uses.

    Pack a small mirror for signaling. A bunch of various sized needles wrapped in several thicknesses/materials of thread. A Tritium "Beta" Light can be expensive, but they are cool as fuck. Collapsible cups, a canteens a small pot for boiling water. The earlier suggestion about condoms was a good one, but not to be used for their original purpose. Unlubricated condoms make very useful water bags. A wire saw can carve up some decent sized branches and takes up very little room. You do need to keep it greased.

    Erandus on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • nukanuka What are circles? Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    I'd put a sleeping bag in the car because you wouldn't want to leave your car running all night long (especially if you forget to crack a window) and just how warm is that old quilt?

    You will want some road flares though, for if you were to get a flat tire in the middle of the night for example. Hell there's a million uses for flares.

    EDIT: Also bring books. Real big ones that take time to read in cause you are stuck waiting someplace and you're bored out of your mind. Not too many obviously because they get heavy. I wouldn't bring a DS along, as fun as it is because it could always get stolen or the battery dies.

    nuka on
    DS: 2667 5365 3193 | 2DS: 2852-8590-3716
  • ArrathArrath regular Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Depending on the environment, I'd throw in a set of crampons. Doesn't need to be a big expensive pair of rigid climbing ones, but a plain set that'll slip over your shoes.

    Who knows when you might need to..walk across a frozen lake?

    Arrath on
    cj iwakura wrote:
    Making for Oregon is suicide, as DOS games have shown.
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    chrishallett83 on
  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks regular The Myth, the Legend, the Bowman, the Shambler FuckerRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Most of those companies that make survival kits/bags have excellent ingredients in a shitty bag and a really high price. You're much better off building one of your own. It'll be much cheaper, and you can customize it to be more useful. A bugout bag needs more than just food.

    Plus, if the world does go to hell the last thing you want is a bright red backpack with a logo on the back that basically screams "I HAVE FOOD, KILL ME FIRST".

    SmokeStacks on
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