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What the Fuck is killing my hard drives.

SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
edited January 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
I got a new computer.

So in two weeks, whatever drive has had the OS on it has died.

Completely dead. Not recognized in bios - 100% dead.

It is not an issue with the sata cables or whatnot...something is killing my hard drives and it's frustrating because it takes less than 5 days and costs money and data every time.

Does anyone have experience with this? What the fuck could be causing this?

Motherboard: EVGA triple SLI X58
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00400NQ3Y/ref=oss_product


Processor: i7 processor
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002A6G3V2/ref=oss_product


Video Card: EVGA Geforce 460 GTX
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003VWW2KK/ref=oss_product


Memory: 3 x 2 gb sticks of DDR3 triple channel kit (G. Skill)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231225

Corsair 750 watt PSU
http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-CMPSU-750TX-750-Watt-Certified-compatible/dp/B000X2677A/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1294962517&sr=8-1

SkyGheNe on

Posts

  • ashridahashridah Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    First guess: Power supply is faulty, and is letting large amounts of voltage spike on the power rails.
    Second guess: Motherboard is doing the crazy voltage thing.
    Third guess: You're getting drives from the same batch. They've all got similar manufacturing defects, and are failing as a result.

    ashridah on
  • NailbunnyPDNailbunnyPD Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    What kind of hard drive? What's the frequency of failure?

    Does anyone else have access to your computer?

    Do you have power issues in your area/home? Do have something that regulates the power provided to your computer, like a UPS?

    Have you tried a different power cable from the PSU to HDD?

    NailbunnyPD on
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  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    What kind of hard drive? What's the frequency of failure?

    Does anyone else have access to your computer?

    Do you have power issues in your area/home? Do have something that regulates the power provided to your computer, like a UPS?

    Have you tried a different power cable from the PSU to HDD?

    1) First was an OCZ Agility SATA SSD 60 gb.
    Second was a Seagate 250 gb 7500 RPM mechanical drive

    First drive died within 5-6 days after installing windows 7.
    second drive died within 5-7 days after installing windows 7.

    I'd say behavior before failing was similar in that for about 5 minutes, things KINDA would skip here and there, but it was so light and infrequent that I didn't think much of it.

    First one died after I rebooted. 2nd blue screened then died.

    2)no one has access to my computer but me

    3) I have a power strip that the computer connects to - that then connects to the wall. Just as an FYI - my old computer (a quad core I built myself) never had this problem. In fact, it's what I'm using to talk to you guys right now. Same wall, same outlet in the power strip etc.

    4) Tried a different power cable...still dead. I've tried putting the drive in 3 different computers...still dead.


    Seriously, my immediate guess is that this power supply is just fucking with me, but I'm not positive. THe only reason why I DON'T think that's the case is because I was using that power supply to power my quad core. I took my quad core and the rest of the components and put them into a different case, different power supply.

    So in other words, the only thing that has changed is the Mobo, processor, ram, and video card (hell, even the video card was in my quad core for a while).

    This has to be a voltage issue, but how the fuck do I isolate that? Maybe my motherboard is doing something screwy?

    Also - I think it's important to note that it's ALWAYS the C: Drive.

    SkyGheNe on
  • Wi11iamWi11iam Registered User
    edited January 2011
    Silly question, but have you hooked up the dead drives to a different computer? I'm assuming you have just you didn't state it.

    Wi11iam on
  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Wi11iam wrote: »
    Silly question, but have you hooked up the dead drives to a different computer? I'm assuming you have just you didn't state it.

    Yes - I have.

    I'm wondering if this board just has an issue with killing shit. Look at this.

    http://www.evga.com/forums/tm.aspx?m=453789&mpage=1

    I had default bios settings, so I don't think Virtualization Technology (that's what I assume VT means) was on, but apparently tons of other people are having the same issue as myself.

    Is that a possibility?

    SkyGheNe on
  • chupamiubrechupamiubre Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    1. almost all drives fail in the first week if they are going to fail at all.

    2. that 250gb hdd sounds rather old. It could have just finally died on you.

    In all honesty if it's not just a coincidence i would say it's probably the psu causing problems.

    chupamiubre on
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  • L Ron HowardL Ron Howard Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Have you tried taking the PSU out of another computer that works, like your backup or whatever you have there, and running it, if it's compatible?
    Have you thought of buying another PSU, same wattage, different MFR, since you're pretty much throwing money out the window?
    Have you contacted your mobo MFR and asked about it?

    L Ron Howard on
  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    I don't know what's killing your drives, but are these drives relatively new? You should check the warranty -- I had the occasional Seagate drive die even after owning it for a few years and it only cost me shipping to get a brand new drive. Would at least save you money while you diagnose the problem.

    EggyToast on
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  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    The OCZ agility was "new" - as in it was around for a few months. The seagate is a few years old. I don't think both of them dying is a coincidence...that would be too insane considering they both died in similar ways...

    Let me explain why I don't think it's the power supply...this case used to house my old parts - a quadcore setup, evga mobo, evga 8800gt, etc. Ran fine - I swapped in the new mobo, processor, memory...and suddenly it fries drives...I mean, it still might be a power issue, just not necessarily the power supply. 750 watts should also be more than enough for this system.

    My brother handed me six drives...what we've done is unplugged everything but the dvd drive, the hard drive, two case fans and...that's it. If it kills another drive - we'll then move on to removing all but 1 stick of ram (so 2gb), putting my old graphics card in (8800 gt), and then running it.

    If it kills again, we'll test the 600 watt power supply, but I really don't think it could possibly be the 750 watter because I wasn't having this issue two weeks ago with my old system :(

    Either way - the one consistent thing is that the computer kills a drive in about 5-6 days...so if it is a power related issue, something will happen.

    Thanks for the support and input everyone...this has been rather trying and depressing.

    @eggy - luckily the OCZ hd is covered and I'm sending it back to them...im out of luck on the seagate though...

    i'm leaning towards this being a mobo issue since there's no physical signs of power problems and because of the old parts working well with it...but who knows...i'll keep everyone posted.

    SkyGheNe on
  • DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    SkyGheNe wrote: »
    i'm leaning towards this being a mobo issue since there's no physical signs of power problems and because of the old parts working well with it...but who knows...i'll keep everyone posted.

    So, instead of killing a few more drives, why don't you sent return or RMA the motherboard?

    Does your BIOS show the info about your motherboard voltages? If so, just go into the BIOS and watch it for awhile to see if they're going out of range frequently. If your BIOS doesn't there are programs that read them from Windows and you can watch them there.

    Daenris on
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    I wonder... what kind of speakers do you have? Is the PC near them?

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, don't @ me
  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    bowen wrote: »
    I wonder... what kind of speakers do you have? Is the PC near them?

    I was just thinking Subwoofer...

    Though if you're pursuing the power possibilities, I'd recommend Hardware Monitor by CPU-Z. You can configure it to log to a text file (preferably on a different drive than the one you're killing).

    Ruckus on
    Raneados wrote: »
    so what SPECIFICALLY is the problem with my hole?
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Ruckus wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    I wonder... what kind of speakers do you have? Is the PC near them?

    I was just thinking Subwoofer...

    Though if you're pursuing the power possibilities, I'd recommend Hardware Monitor by CPU-Z. You can configure it to log to a text file (preferably on a different drive than the one you're killing).

    My friend made her monitor a freaky color with her shitty quality speaker. Degauss did nothing to fix it either.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, don't @ me
  • SatsumomoSatsumomo Rated PG! Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Modern HDD's have magnetic shielding though.

    Satsumomo on
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Satsumomo wrote: »
    Modern HDD's have magnetic shielding though.

    Thought this was just generated while the drive was in use? Though, I guess that wouldn't make much sense if the PC is on unless it turned off for power saving or something, and the person had a really shitty set of speakers.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, don't @ me
  • TechBoyTechBoy Registered User
    edited January 2011
    Well, first of all I wouldn't completely discount the possibility of it just being a fluke. The SSD was new so maybe it was just a bad one, and the HD was old so maybe it was just on its way out. That's always a possibility... that said


    If one of the drives that died was an SSD, I would think the issue has to be the power supply, wouldn't it?

    I mean Hard Drives have all sorts of points of failure, you've got the big spinning disks, the read head that hovers over the surface, tons of motors and moving points. Factors like vibration, heat, and magnetic interference could cause all sorts of wonky operation that leads to permanent damage to the working parts. Motors could blow, the read head could scratch the disk, etc. etc.

    But an SSD is just a bunch of NAND flash memory chips soldered to a control board. No moving parts, practically impervious to most of the issues that plague regular HDs. Unless the SSD was defective from manufacturing or transport, the only way I can see it dying that quickly is from over/under-voltage from the PSU.

    I don't think the mobo would come into play at all. Mobos control the voltages sent to stuff like memory and the CPU, but I think peripherals get power directly from the PSU. The mobos only relation to a HD would be in reading and writing data.

    And while I understand that this PSU should be high enough rated to support everything, understand that PSU's can degrade and go bad. It could be that your PSU has been slowly degrading the whole time, and while it was still good enough to power your old system with no problems, this new system has higher demands and it isn't able to keep up. Alternatively it could be that you inadvertently damaged the PSU during the new build, maybe you yanked a cord too hard or jostled it the wrong way, who knows.

    Definitely check the BIOS for voltage readings. Make sure the 3.3v, 5v, and 12v lines are outputting at those specs (give or take a 5% deviation). But if those readings are ok your issue may only happen when the system is under load, and that's much trickier to conclusively pin down.

    TechBoy on
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  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Daenris wrote: »
    SkyGheNe wrote: »
    i'm leaning towards this being a mobo issue since there's no physical signs of power problems and because of the old parts working well with it...but who knows...i'll keep everyone posted.

    So, instead of killing a few more drives, why don't you sent return or RMA the motherboard?

    Does your BIOS show the info about your motherboard voltages? If so, just go into the BIOS and watch it for awhile to see if they're going out of range frequently. If your BIOS doesn't there are programs that read them from Windows and you can watch them there.

    We looked in the bios and all the voltages are fine after 20 minutes idle.

    I have a utility that I'm currently using to monitor the voltages.
    Thought this was just generated while the drive was in use? Though, I guess that wouldn't make much sense if the PC is on unless it turned off for power saving or something, and the person had a really shitty set of speakers.

    No speakers nearby. Should also be good in this regard.

    And while I understand that this PSU should be high enough rated to support everything, understand that PSU's can degrade and go bad. It could be that your PSU has been slowly degrading the whole time, and while it was still good enough to power your old system with no problems, this new system has higher demands and it isn't able to keep up. Alternatively it could be that you inadvertently damaged the PSU during the new build, maybe you yanked a cord too hard or jostled it the wrong way, who knows.

    Definitely check the BIOS for voltage readings. Make sure the 3.3v, 5v, and 12v lines are outputting at those specs (give or take a 5% deviation). But if those readings are ok your issue may only happen when the system is under load, and that's much trickier to conclusively pin down.

    Thanks for all the info. I'm going to keep monitoring it and put it under some major stress over the next few days by playing starcraft 2 on max. Voltages on my right monitor, game on my left.

    In regards to the systems...one needed 450-500ish watts, this one needs 555ish, so if a 750 watt corsair degraded that much in just two years I'll be pretty :evil:

    It is possible both drives just up and died...but that would be kinda freaky...and possible evidence of a higher being existing and hating me enough to kill two drives in two weeks haha.

    Hah...D:

    SkyGheNe on
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