Art Crit!

Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
edited April 2011 in Artist's Corner
I've already posted the comic I'm writing with my brother, but I'd also like some critique on the art I'm making in school. I'll start with this drawing I did in photoshop for class last year:

5357954446_985a59fabd_b.jpg

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Posts

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I don't think the scratchy linework or rendering is helping you here. It looks rushed and not very thought-out.

    NightDragon on
  • NakedZerglingNakedZergling A more apocalyptic post apocalypse Portland OregonRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I think you need to be working on paper with a pencil at this point in you development.

    NakedZergling on
  • slydonslydon Registered User
    edited March 2011
    I like the hands. Lots of tension. The face, not as much. Shaq looks confused.

    slydon on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited March 2011
    I have done a lot of work on paper, so here's some of that:

    5357335015_970941d412_b.jpg
    self portrait

    5357334741_d41425bb9b_b.jpg
    michelangelo drawing study

    5357334307_01169ed26d_b.jpg
    some dude

    Apologies for the shoddy photography. I'll post more later.

    Eli Brophy on
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    How long do these typically take you to finish?

    NightDragon on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited March 2011
    How long do these typically take you to finish?
    The first 2 probably took me an hour or so each and the 3rd probably took me 30-40 minutes (it was in class).

    Eli Brophy on
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    You might want to try doubling the time you spend on pieces, and then work to increase that. I understand that may not be possible in a classroom setting, but definitely try that on your own time, if doing it during class time is not possible. You may be working too fast - slow down and try to perfect every part of what you're doing. Sketching fast is good for some things, and has its purpose...but if you're looking to make anything look more finished (like the digital piece you posted first), I think it would be a good idea for you to slow down your process and try to pay closer attention to every step, to make sure you do the best you can.

    NightDragon on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited March 2011
    You might want to try doubling the time you spend on pieces, and then work to increase that. I understand that may not be possible in a classroom setting, but definitely try that on your own time, if doing it during class time is not possible. You may be working too fast - slow down and try to perfect every part of what you're doing. Sketching fast is good for some things, and has its purpose...but if you're looking to make anything look more finished (like the digital piece you posted first), I think it would be a good idea for you to slow down your process and try to pay closer attention to every step, to make sure you do the best you can.

    Yeah for sure, these were all assignments for class, so I didn't put as much work in as I would have on a personal project.

    Eli Brophy on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited March 2011
    So here's some paintings.
    5357337019_c77262a233_b.jpg
    5357336293_37d1a5ecbf_b.jpg
    5357335505_de6f67505f_b.jpg

    Once again I'm not a good photographer.

    Eli Brophy on
  • The_Glad_HatterThe_Glad_Hatter Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    on the self-portrait; when doing portraits always make sure the eyes are at about half of the total skull height, or else you'll end up looking a bit neanderthalish..
    Look up some portraiture/ anatomy books from the tuturial thread for a far better explanation of what to mind.

    also, don't be afraid to try some 3 quarters portraits as these usually are a bit easier for me to start with (since you get to draw a profiled nose etc..)

    The_Glad_Hatter on
  • NakedZerglingNakedZergling A more apocalyptic post apocalypse Portland OregonRegistered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Still work on paper..a LOT more

    NakedZergling on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited April 2011
    Still work on paper..a LOT more

    I shall. Also, this work is over a year old, I've improved marginally.

    Eli Brophy on
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited April 2011
    Where are you in your schooling career, exactly? I mean year and age wise?

    Iruka on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited April 2011
    Iruka wrote: »
    Where are you in your schooling career, exactly? I mean year and age wise?

    I'm 19, college sophomore.

    Eli Brophy on
  • RankenphileRankenphile Passersby were amazed by the unusually large amounts of blood.Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited April 2011
    if you don't mind my asking, why are you not putting in as much time on your assignments then you would on a personal project

    too much other work to get done, tight deadlines, or just less motivated?

    Rankenphile on
    8406wWN.png
  • winter_combat_knightwinter_combat_knight Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    I'm liking your paintings. Colours and values are pretty well considered. Your pencil drawings lack confidence in the lines - which is normal for someone rather new to drawing. Keep at it dude.

    winter_combat_knight on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited April 2011
    if you don't mind my asking, why are you not putting in as much time on your assignments then you would on a personal project

    too much other work to get done, tight deadlines, or just less motivated?
    It's a little bit of each. I generally work harder on something I made outside of class though.

    Eli Brophy on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited April 2011
    I'm liking your paintings. Colours and values are pretty well considered. Your pencil drawings lack confidence in the lines - which is normal for someone rather new to drawing. Keep at it dude.

    Thanks, I will.

    Eli Brophy on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited April 2011
    5357334487_5ed6cec3ac_b.jpg
    nude lady person

    5357948916_4a93ede36b_b.jpg
    still life under a table with voltaire's head

    5357335249_88103d44f8_b.jpg
    ink drawing of another art student

    5357336823_c48486518e_b.jpg
    intaglio print

    Eli Brophy on
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Eli Brophy wrote: »
    if you don't mind my asking, why are you not putting in as much time on your assignments then you would on a personal project

    too much other work to get done, tight deadlines, or just less motivated?
    It's a little bit of each. I generally work harder on something I made outside of class though.

    I can understand that, but...at the same time, that's one of the main reasons I didn't ever really post much schoolwork here. I mostly post personal work. The reason people post work here, generally, is to get feedback to improve their skills. The problem with posting something you didn't care about from the get-go, or posting something you knowingly didn't try very hard on...is that every critique we can give you at this point can be thrown out of the window because you "didn't spend that much time/effort on them, because they weren't personal projects". Do you see what I'm saying? It's just a difficult thing for us to figure out what to say here to help you improve. That is the purpose of this forum though - a place to post your work in hopes of receiving constructive criticism.

    You don't seem unwilling to receive feedback, but I kinda feel like it's going to be pointless to give you any type of critique right now, because all you're posting is your schoolwork...which you've already inferred isn't your best work. If you post some of your recent personal work - work you think is some of the best you've done - that would be excellent...but right now I don't think what you're posting is going to help you. I'd like to see something you consider "finished", or very close to it...something you think represents your skills accurately.

    NightDragon on
  • KendeathwalkerKendeathwalker Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Take any advice about studying the fundamentals of drawing to heart. You've got a pretty weak grasp of form and value, spend as much time as you possibly can while still in college improving skill. The higher your skill level the more you will be able to experiment and problem solve efficiently.

    I love the example of alpenfenger over on CA.. just do what he did..

    Kendeathwalker on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited April 2011
    Eli Brophy wrote: »
    if you don't mind my asking, why are you not putting in as much time on your assignments then you would on a personal project

    too much other work to get done, tight deadlines, or just less motivated?
    It's a little bit of each. I generally work harder on something I made outside of class though.

    I can understand that, but...at the same time, that's one of the main reasons I didn't ever really post much schoolwork here. I mostly post personal work. The reason people post work here, generally, is to get feedback to improve their skills. The problem with posting something you didn't care about from the get-go, or posting something you knowingly didn't try very hard on...is that every critique we can give you at this point can be thrown out of the window because you "didn't spend that much time/effort on them, because they weren't personal projects". Do you see what I'm saying? It's just a difficult thing for us to figure out what to say here to help you improve. That is the purpose of this forum though - a place to post your work in hopes of receiving constructive criticism.

    You don't seem unwilling to receive feedback, but I kinda feel like it's going to be pointless to give you any type of critique right now, because all you're posting is your schoolwork...which you've already inferred isn't your best work. If you post some of your recent personal work - work you think is some of the best you've done - that would be excellent...but right now I don't think what you're posting is going to help you. I'd like to see something you consider "finished", or very close to it...something you think represents your skills accurately.

    I totally see what you're saying. I do feel that some of this work does accurately represent my skill. I also haven't gotten around to taking pictures of my more recent work yet so I just posted what I have up already. I haven't had all that much time recently to work on personal projects with all my school work (I'm also switching schools so I've been busy with that), so maybe I should have waited until the summer when I can work hard on personal projects to post work. Thank you for the criticism though.

    Eli Brophy on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited April 2011
    Take any advice about studying the fundamentals of drawing to heart. You've got a pretty weak grasp of form and value, spend as much time as you possibly can while still in college improving skill. The higher your skill level the more you will be able to experiment and problem solve efficiently.

    I love the example of alpenfenger over on CA.. just do what he did..

    What's alpenfenger?

    Eli Brophy on
  • KendeathwalkerKendeathwalker Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    I didnt spell his username right, been a long time since Ive looked at his thread.

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=114449

    I think he was 19 when he started? the thread spans two years. It shows almost unreal progress.

    However..He gave himself carpel tunnel in both wrists and is still recovering last I checked.

    Kendeathwalker on
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited April 2011
    I didnt spell his username right, been a long time since Ive looked at his thread.

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=114449

    I think he was 19 when he started? the thread spans two years. It shows almost unreal progress.

    However..He gave himself carpel tunnel in both wrists and is still recovering last I checked.

    Well I don't want carpal tunnel but I'll work harder on my art this summer and post it here, I really want to continue to get criticism.

    Eli Brophy on
  • RankenphileRankenphile Passersby were amazed by the unusually large amounts of blood.Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited April 2011
    Look, I'm just going to lay out my personal philosophy, and it entirely up to you to take it or leave it.

    Don't take school work any less seriously then personal work. I'm assuming you went to school for two reasons: to become a better artist and to get a job making art. You're doing both goals a disservice by treating school work as secondary. Every single thing you do in school should be done to the utmost best of your ability, given the deadline and assignment criteria. It is easy, especially in American/Western society, to blow off school as lame bullshit, and there is still a stigma that treats caring about school/personal improvement as lame.

    Those philosophies are entirely propagated by lazy people who are destined to fail.

    School provides an environment where you are allowed to try experimental techniques or approaches and fail in the attempt. This sort of environment does not exist anywhere else in reality, unless you're part of some weird hipster art collective, and frankly I don't have a lot of hope that such efforts whave any sort of likeliness for longevity. You want a job in art, expect to do things you're not entirely enthusiastic about, and to have to do them with your complete attention and effort or you will not be asked to do them again.

    Look - everything you do should be done with every ounce of effort you have available. Why? Because there are others out there competing with you for those jobs that are definitely trying their hardest, who are better then you and who are more dedicated then you. To succeed, to get hired for a job, you don't need to be the absolute best artist in the world, but you absolutely need to show that you have the work ethic that proves you're going to take your work seriously.

    I'm a student, too, and I'm at a fiercely competitive, incredibly grueling school. I see students who don't really care about their work, and I see them fail. Every time. I see students who do care about their work and who take it seriously, who practice constantly, and they are absolutely astounding in their improvement. In two years, I've seen a kid who I never really thought much of, whose work was incredibly sub-par, improve to be one of the best students at the school, and I would absolutely hire him for a studio if I ran it because he's proven he takes it seriously. He works his ass off, and it shows in his work.

    That last sentence there is the important one - he works his ass off, and it shows in his work. Every bit of effort you put into your work will show in your work. Conversely, every corner you cut, every time you think "fuck it, that's good enough, it's just for school" will absolutely show in your work. To get a job, you're going to need a portfolio, a body of work that stands up as your best. When do you plan on doing that? Later?

    Man, fuck later. Later never comes. Do good work now. Do good work always. There is no point in doing half-assed work. Don't try do be the best, but always try to be better then your last attempt. Half-assing things never teaches you jack shit, because you're never giving yourself a chance to learn from a failed challenge.

    I'm sorry if I'm coming off like I'm on some soap box, but I see a LOT of folks who just sort of put in work that is "eh, good enough", and I'm telling you right now - I'm out there working harder, and so are hundreds and thousands of other folks that are trying for the same damn jobs, and very few of us are happy with "good enough".

    Rankenphile on
    8406wWN.png
  • Eli BrophyEli Brophy Registered User
    edited April 2011
    Look, I'm just going to lay out my personal philosophy, and it entirely up to you to take it or leave it.

    Don't take school work any less seriously then personal work. I'm assuming you went to school for two reasons: to become a better artist and to get a job making art. You're doing both goals a disservice by treating school work as secondary. Every single thing you do in school should be done to the utmost best of your ability, given the deadline and assignment criteria. It is easy, especially in American/Western society, to blow off school as lame bullshit, and there is still a stigma that treats caring about school/personal improvement as lame.

    Those philosophies are entirely propagated by lazy people who are destined to fail.

    School provides an environment where you are allowed to try experimental techniques or approaches and fail in the attempt. This sort of environment does not exist anywhere else in reality, unless you're part of some weird hipster art collective, and frankly I don't have a lot of hope that such efforts whave any sort of likeliness for longevity. You want a job in art, expect to do things you're not entirely enthusiastic about, and to have to do them with your complete attention and effort or you will not be asked to do them again.

    Look - everything you do should be done with every ounce of effort you have available. Why? Because there are others out there competing with you for those jobs that are definitely trying their hardest, who are better then you and who are more dedicated then you. To succeed, to get hired for a job, you don't need to be the absolute best artist in the world, but you absolutely need to show that you have the work ethic that proves you're going to take your work seriously.

    I'm a student, too, and I'm at a fiercely competitive, incredibly grueling school. I see students who don't really care about their work, and I see them fail. Every time. I see students who do care about their work and who take it seriously, who practice constantly, and they are absolutely astounding in their improvement. In two years, I've seen a kid who I never really thought much of, whose work was incredibly sub-par, improve to be one of the best students at the school, and I would absolutely hire him for a studio if I ran it because he's proven he takes it seriously. He works his ass off, and it shows in his work.

    That last sentence there is the important one - he works his ass off, and it shows in his work. Every bit of effort you put into your work will show in your work. Conversely, every corner you cut, every time you think "fuck it, that's good enough, it's just for school" will absolutely show in your work. To get a job, you're going to need a portfolio, a body of work that stands up as your best. When do you plan on doing that? Later?

    Man, fuck later. Later never comes. Do good work now. Do good work always. There is no point in doing half-assed work. Don't try do be the best, but always try to be better then your last attempt. Half-assing things never teaches you jack shit, because you're never giving yourself a chance to learn from a failed challenge.

    I'm sorry if I'm coming off like I'm on some soap box, but I see a LOT of folks who just sort of put in work that is "eh, good enough", and I'm telling you right now - I'm out there working harder, and so are hundreds and thousands of other folks that are trying for the same damn jobs, and very few of us are happy with "good enough".

    I totally get what you're saying. I didn't mean to come off as apathetic, art is the primary motivation in my life. I do put in a lot of effort on school assignments but I suppose that I didn't spend enough time outside of class working on the projects. I've always had super positive reinforcement from both teachers and my parents, saying that I was great and in some cases that my art is the best in the class. I thought this was great and I appreciated it, but on some level it was kind of lame since they weren't giving me harsher critiques so that's partially why I came here.

    And this work is also from about a year ago, I've grown a lot as an artist and a student since then. Once I get the chance to take pictures of my recent work I'll post it here.

    Thanks for keeping it real.

    Eli Brophy on
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