Cable doens't work with new router

lowlylowlycooklowlylowlycook Registered User regular
So I'm trying to set up the office in my dad's church for wireless internet so he can use his new iPad there. I've got the new router set up and it works with my laptop both with a cable and over wireless. The thing is that neither his old desktop or my laptop can connect to the new router using the cable that runs into his office.

I'm thinking that this is because the new router has gigabit ports and is failing to negotiate a connection over this old ethernet cable. I'm now looking into how to get the router ( a Netgear WNDR 3400) to downgrade the ports.

Am I on the right track or should I working a different angle?

[edit] Well I have it working for now. I just attached the old router in between his computer and the new router.

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  • tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Check for static IP settings.

    As for the old cable, it's an ethernet cable running through the wall? I don't see why the laptop would work with another cable and the new router, but wouldn't work with the old cable unless you put the old router in between...

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  • Mr_RoseMr_Rose 83 Blue Ridge Protects the Holy Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Simplest answer is that, being an old cable, the final pair of wires wasn't actually connected, or wasn't connected properly; gigabit ethernet needs all eight wires to get your magical 1000Mbps but previous generations only needed the first six so a lot of companies and enthusiasts either didn't bother or let cables with incorrectly connected brown pairs pass QC as good.

    Anyway, now seems like a good opportunity to invest in a cable checker; one with an LED for each wire and which understands the difference between regular and crossover cable would be best. Then you can check for the other possible problem which is that you've got a cross-over cable when you ought to have a straight through, and your old router was of the type that silently auto-detects and compensates for this.

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  • lowlylowlycooklowlylowlycook Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Mr_Rose wrote: »
    Simplest answer is that, being an old cable, the final pair of wires wasn't actually connected, or wasn't connected properly; gigabit ethernet needs all eight wires to get your magical 1000Mbps but previous generations only needed the first six so a lot of companies and enthusiasts either didn't bother or let cables with incorrectly connected brown pairs pass QC as good.

    Anyway, now seems like a good opportunity to invest in a cable checker; one with an LED for each wire and which understands the difference between regular and crossover cable would be best. Then you can check for the other possible problem which is that you've got a cross-over cable when you ought to have a straight through, and your old router was of the type that silently auto-detects and compensates for this.

    Yeah, the old cable is custom made. I think it runs through the floor so I'm not sure how easy it would be to replace. I'll tell my dad and he can decide what to do.

    Thanks guys.

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