Wasted Space

DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
edited March 2012 in Artist's Corner
comic001.png
comic002.png
comic003.png
comic004.png
comic005.png
comic006.png
comic007.png
comic008.png

Daemonic on

Posts

  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    edited March 2012
    Okay, I'll start. Three panel gag strips are cliche. The two guys and a girl thing is cliche. Game references are cliche. Too much copy and paste with the art. Use different angles more. Backgrounds! The shadowing could use some love. The word 1337 hasn't been cool since 1980's. The speech bubbles aren't consistent in regards to space around the lettering. Long arms!

    Daemonic on
  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    Daemonic wrote: »
    Okay, I'll start. Three panel gag strips are cliche. The two guys and a girl thing is cliche. Game references are cliche. Too much copy and paste with the art. Use different angles more. Backgrounds! The shadowing could use some love. The word 1337 hasn't been cool since 1980's. The speech bubbles aren't consistent in regards to space around the lettering. Long arms!

    Thanks for the feedback, Daemonic. The reason I went with the three panel format is because I think it works better on widescreen monitors and minimizes scrolling. The space limitation also helps me focus the dialogue and cut down on excessive or long winded conversations (like this post). Maybe I will play with other formats in the future.

    I tried to keep pop culture and game references to a minimum. What can I say? I love Magic and D&D. In this instance I think it works because the strip isn't about the games it's about the characters and those things reinforce who they are. I can see why you would fear this becoming yet another webcomic about gaming. I promise not to do that. I also promise not to use internet memes.

    I copied and pasted a lot in the first strips because I initially planned on doing one a day. I find that some days I just don't have a good idea or other real life concerns take precedent. I can see how the strips with a new drawing and viewing angle in each panel just look better. I am still going to copy and paste sometimes due to time constraints and laziness but will try to avoid this.

    I would love to do backgrounds. I don't want to get carried though away though because it takes that much longer to finish a strip. I could either do a couple strips a week with backgrounds or five a week without backgrounds. Also, I'm lazy.

    I haven't found just the right technique for the shadows. I'm still learning and this is my first webcomic. I expect the art quality to improve over time. Using Photoshop and a digital pen are new for me but now that I've gotten used to it, there's no way I'm going back. I should probably do the lettering with Illustrator but it seems much simpler in PS.

    1337 speak and long arms will always be cool!

    Thanks again for the critique.

  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    I dont know how to take your self-crit theater, But if its feedback you want, the best way to get it more quickly is to outline the questions you have or the goals you've set when you originally post, as it will give people a launching point for feedback.

    My best advice, if this is something you are taking seriously and improvement is what you are going for, is to not be lazy. Being "lazy" about things like copy and past and backgrounds will turn great art into okay art, and Okay art into kinda shitty. As a cartoonist you can latch onto humor, charm, style and all manor of surface distractions, but all of them combined cant hide weak, unattended craft.

    With that in mind, You also should not "expect" the art quality to improve over time, the skills don't get shipped to you in installments. If you want the comic to improve, you'll have to do some drawing outside of it. If you'd like your characters and their geeky antics to carry this comic to glory despite the sea of lookalikes, I'd recommend at least making it as visually appealing as you can, which is going to require some effort on your part. On the journey, you will probably find what you can do to differentiate your comic and make it interesting and/or personal.


  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    Iruka wrote: »
    I dont know how to take your self-crit theater, But if its feedback you want, the best way to get it more quickly is to outline the questions you have or the goals you've set when you originally post, as it will give people a launching point for feedback.

    My best advice, if this is something you are taking seriously and improvement is what you are going for, is to not be lazy. Being "lazy" about things like copy and past and backgrounds will turn great art into okay art, and Okay art into kinda shitty. As a cartoonist you can latch onto humor, charm, style and all manor of surface distractions, but all of them combined cant hide weak, unattended craft.

    With that in mind, You also should not "expect" the art quality to improve over time, the skills don't get shipped to you in installments. If you want the comic to improve, you'll have to do some drawing outside of it. If you'd like your characters and their geeky antics to carry this comic to glory despite the sea of lookalikes, I'd recommend at least making it as visually appealing as you can, which is going to require some effort on your part. On the journey, you will probably find what you can do to differentiate your comic and make it interesting and/or personal.


    I. Art
    1. Quality
    2. Style
    3. Production

    II. Writing
    1. Dialogue
    2. Characters
    3. Premise

    My delusions of grandeur are long since abandoned. That's not to say I don't want to make something I'm proud of. Saying that I'm lazy is self-depreciating humor. This isn't complicated.

    I expect it to improve because I'm still learning the digital medium. I'm not at all disappointed in how it turned out but want to improve regardless. Could you expand on the "sea of lookalikes"? I certainly want to be original but just doing something totally unique for the sake of it is not my goal. How would you recommend making it more visually appealing? I need details not platitudes.

  • brokecrackerbrokecracker Registered User regular
    Okay, I'll bite. I will try and break it into pieces for you. You will probably think I am an asshole, sorry in advance but trust me, crits come an awful lot more hateful around here than this:

    CRIT: First problem to address would be line variance. There seems to be very little.
    ADVICE: If you are using a tablet up the sensitivity and pick a wider brush. Practice with that.

    CRIT: Copy and pasting, if you know it looks lazy and cheap why on earth would you do it? This is one of the top reasons I read your first post and didn't bother to respond.
    ADVICE: If you are worried about churning them out at a breakneck pace, don't. Lower the frequency you post, problem solved. Seriously, if you honestly think LESS drawing is the answer then it is time to think of a new hobby.

    CRIT: Backgrounds, there are none.
    ADVICE: "I could either do a couple strips a week with backgrounds or five a week without backgrounds." Do a couple of strips a week then, problem solved. No one likes to draw them, do it anyway. See the last sentence of the paragraph above.

    CRIT: I can't speak for Iruka, but part of the "sea of lookalikes" includes "spiky haired extreme dude with goatee" and "long black haired brooding dude." We have all seen them too many times. The poses are stiff and seeing the same pose three times in a row doesn't loosen it up.
    ADVICE: life drawing, life drawing, life drawing, practice, do character turns for each of your characters. Take more time laying out the comic than drawing it. Do thumbnails first.

    What worries me is that you yourself addressed some of these things in your own self critique. If you know there are things wrong and have not taken the time to fix them and have excuses at the ready, what good will be getting any advice from us?


  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    edited March 2012
    Okay, I'll bite. I will try and break it into pieces for you. You will probably think I am an asshole, sorry in advance but trust me, crits come an awful lot more hateful around here than this:

    CRIT: First problem to address would be line variance. There seems to be very little.
    ADVICE: If you are using a tablet up the sensitivity and pick a wider brush. Practice with that.

    Sound advice. I'm drawing at 1200dpi and using Shape Dynamics with Pen Pressure. Do you think I should use a lower resolution or get a pen with more pressure levels?
    CRIT: Copy and pasting, if you know it looks lazy and cheap why on earth would you do it? This is one of the top reasons I read your first post and didn't bother to respond.
    ADVICE: If you are worried about churning them out at a breakneck pace, don't. Lower the frequency you post, problem solved. Seriously, if you honestly think LESS drawing is the answer then it is time to think of a new hobby.

    You're right. I should take the time to make every strip count instead of just making a strip for the sake of it. What do you think of the writing? Because I think having the best artwork is secondary to a good story. Does the story suffer from static panel elements?
    CRIT: Backgrounds, there are none.
    ADVICE: "I could either do a couple strips a week with backgrounds or five a week without backgrounds." Do a couple of strips a week then, problem solved. No one likes to draw them, do it anyway. See the last sentence of th paragraph above.

    I agree. I just want to make sure I post enough updates to keep people interested. I will work on the backgrounds.*
    CRIT: I can't speak for Iruka, but part of the "sea of lookalikes" includes "spiky haired extreme dude with goatee" and "long black haired brooding dude." We have all seen them too many times. The poses are stiff and seeing the same pose three times in a row doesn't loosen it up.
    ADVICE: life drawing, life drawing, life drawing, practice, do character turns for each of your characters. Take more time laying out the comic than drawing it. Do thumbnails first.

    I'm not familiar with that, I don't read a lot of webcomics. Could you link some examples? Do you think there should be more extreme dynamic poses? Because that's really not what I'm going for.
    What worries me is that you yourself addressed some of these things in your own self critique. If you know there are things wrong and have not taken the time to fix them and have excuses at the ready, what good will be getting any advice from us?

    You're not an asshole, just honest. Thanks.



    *Addendum:
    I looked at your webcomics and see that you use very minimalistic or simple backgrounds so I'm not sure what to think about your statement now.

    Daemonic on
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    I'm not trying to be an asshole, but sorry if I'm coming off that way. The format of "two dudes playing video games" or "two dudes and their everyday banter" is common, the popularity of PA causes many people to try it and post the results here. I cant really name any of them, a lot of them are abandoned and not memorable at all.

    The copy-pasting bores the reader into not even really looking at the characters. The major thing that your art would lend to you joke would be solid expressions. You don't need to have crazy dynamic poses of super detailed backgrounds, just enough to give some context, and some emotion in your characters. Redrawing the panels, even if the characters are in the same position for the most part, will enable you to make shifts in the expression and subtle shifts in the pose, which is what the reader is looking for to fill in the joke.

    I'd recommend Scott McClouds books, if you want to read about more comic theory in general. I'd also check out the webcomics thread over in SE++ and look around at the general webcomics scene if you aren't keeping up with many. Life drawing is something you try, even if you don't immediately see how it would apply to your comic.

    Also, if you haven't seen the stickies, there are a lot of links to helpful tutorials that the forum has collected. Check out other members threads too, we have quite a few comic people on the board.

    Anyways, welcome.

  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    Iruka wrote: »
    I'm not trying to be an asshole, but sorry if I'm coming off that way. The format of "two dudes playing video games" or "two dudes and their everyday banter" is common, the popularity of PA causes many people to try it and post the results here. I cant really name any of them, a lot of them are abandoned and not memorable at all.

    The copy-pasting bores the reader into not even really looking at the characters. The major thing that your art would lend to you joke would be solid expressions. You don't need to have crazy dynamic poses of super detailed backgrounds, just enough to give some context, and some emotion in your characters. Redrawing the panels, even if the characters are in the same position for the most part, will enable you to make shifts in the expression and subtle shifts in the pose, which is what the reader is looking for to fill in the joke.

    I'd recommend Scott McClouds books, if you want to read about more comic theory in general. I'd also check out the webcomics thread over in SE++ and look around at the general webcomics scene if you aren't keeping up with many. Life drawing is something you try, even if you don't immediately see how it would apply to your comic.

    Also, if you haven't seen the stickies, there are a lot of links to helpful tutorials that the forum has collected. Check out other members threads too, we have quite a few comic people on the board.

    Anyways, welcome.

    These two dudes are starting a band, that's what the comic is about. It's based on my own experiences being in a local band. The band has to start somewhere. I'm not really sure how to change that without changing the entire premise. It being two girls or a guy and a girl or some talking animals doesn't seem much of a solution. Are my characters unlikeable or too derivative of something else? I know Penny Arcade has two main male characters, does that mean this path is off limits for any future artists?

    The main criticism's here seem to be the backgrounds, copy and pasting, and "life drawing" has been mentioned a lot. I took Life Drawing courses in college. I know I'm no Burne Hogarth but are the poses and anatomy really that bad? If you think redrawing every panel will help the storytelling aspect I will definitely take that into consideration. I do like the strips without it better. Really thinking about backgrounds now too.

    I own "Understanding Comics" and "Making Comics" by McCloud. Is "Reinventing Comics" worth the read?

    Thanks for the welcome.


    BTW, I looked at your Deviant Gallery, very painterly and colorful, wish I was better with color.




  • farbekriegfarbekrieg Registered User regular
    Daemonic wrote: »


    *Addendum:
    I looked at your webcomics and see that you use very minimalistic or simple backgrounds so I'm not sure what to think about your statement now.

    Why would broke's work have any effect at all on his excellent advice?

  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    farbekrieg wrote: »
    Daemonic wrote: »


    *Addendum:
    I looked at your webcomics and see that you use very minimalistic or simple backgrounds so I'm not sure what to think about your statement now.

    Why would broke's work have any effect at all on his excellent advice?

    I thought it was relevant because he objects to the use of no backgrounds but has little to none in his own panels. Just confused, that's all. I agree with the advice.

  • brokecrackerbrokecracker Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    I'm not saying the background has to be super detailed or anything, but enough to get a sense of setting is important.

    very minimalistic or simple backgrounds > no backgrounds

    I'm not here to discuss my comic, I have my own thread for that. You are probably going to get a lot of advice from a lot of different people here. Some are professional artists, some are just starting out. It is going to be hard to seperate the message from the messenger sometimes, but we wouldn't comment unless we we honestly trying to help.

    Welcome to the forums! To get some more solid crits on the poses and anatomy, post some of the non-finished work or skecthes. It always helps to see the drawing in progess rather than the finished product.

    EDIT, sorry I forgot to respond to the other questions:

    Do you think I should use a lower resolution or get a pen with more pressure levels?
    Unless you are keeping them at such high resolution so you can eventually print them, yea I would drop it down.

    Does the story suffer from static panel elements?
    Yes. Since it is a comic, it needs to read like one. If the characters don't move even the slightest from panel to panel they subconsciously seem less "real" and less relatable. So as weird as it sounds, yes.

    Could you link some examples?
    Like Iruka said "I'd also check out the webcomics thread over in SE++" It is a great resource and some very funny reads. You will see some get trashed (http://www.cad-comic.com/) and some get put on a pedestal (http://paranatural.net/) If you follow those links you will see one very bad comic and one very good comic. Read a couple of sample of each.


    brokecracker on
  • squidbunnysquidbunny Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    This conversation about resolution is meaningless without actual pixel dimensions. How big are these when you're working on them? 600px wide or 5000 px wide? Dpi itself means nothing to how something feels to work on in Photoshop; a document that's 500x500 is the same to ink at 72dpi as it is at 9600 dpi. It's still 500 pixels wide.

    That said I agree with broke; use a bigger brush and allow yourself more pen pressure. But don't necessarily work smaller, ever. You can always scale down. A bigger doc will allow you smoother lines, more control and yeah if you ever do want to print anything the option's still there.

    And yeah, life drawing. Not only is your anatomy anemic; your coloring could benefit from observation. You don't have much of a handle on light/color. Stay away from dodge/burn/multiply for your shading.

    I'm not saying you have to draw people photorealistically in your strip, but a better understanding of these things will shine through your cartooning the same way your deficiencies are showing through the cracks now. Show us some of your drawing from outside the strip and we can better help improve your art.

    squidbunny on
    header_image_sm.jpg
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    Your writing needs work. You have few, if any, punchlines and the ones you do are ill placed and come across as bland. For example, the "I also told her you're gay" comic has one, that line. But it's delivered too early. "This means war" is really not an acceptable or humorous response in this context.

    Lets assume you remove the "I told her you're gay" line for a moment.
    Panel 2 then is just "She has a boyfriend, also you just lost at magic. We also add a "sigh" from our losing player.
    Then in Panel three we have the "Also: I told her you were gay" and a reaction shot from randy that is appropriate and angry. Or maybe a minimalist twitch of the eye. There are lots of ways to play with it, but you need to pace your writing in a fashion that allows your art to sell it.

    Comedic delivery is an art and something you have to practice. Work at your setup and playing with expectations. Watch Daniel Tosh or Eddie Izzard for a good example of layering individual jokes to create a more entertaining whole. Or watch Abbot and Castello to get a feel for comedic banter and how to execute it in a quick, clever fashion. Just like with your art, your writing will need steady practice to improve.

    You might want to take advantage of Script Frenzy this April to practice planning out interwoven jokes and plan out some narrative arcs if that's your cup of tea. Building upon a theme or narrative can be very helpful in gaining a following, and layering humor to be cumulative pays off long term. If you know where the story is going, you can layer your humor in a fashion that each joke builds to a greater joke, and also keep the momentum going for your readers to come back for for each successive comic.

  • NicNic Registered User regular
    I say this as one Nic to another.
    There's a lot that needs improvement but the best and most important thing you can do is keep going with it. Look at Penny Arcade as an example, not the model of the comic, but rather the improvement of it as a thing. Wednesday's comic is a prime example, where they did the third panel as if it was drawn in in 1998.
    The advice and criticism you are receiving here is golden, but is also a guideline, the best way to improve is by challenging your own abilities, and nobody knows what challenges you most better than yourself.

    I don't have much in the way of advice to offer, but I will post a fix on something that grinds my gears about one of your strips:
    fixed.jpg

  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    edited March 2012
    squidbunny wrote: »
    This conversation about resolution is meaningless without actual pixel dimensions. How big are these when you're working on them? 600px wide or 5000 px wide? Dpi itself means nothing to how something feels to work on in Photoshop; a document that's 500x500 is the same to ink at 72dpi as it is at 9600 dpi. It's still 500 pixels wide.

    That said I agree with broke; use a bigger brush and allow yourself more pen pressure. But don't necessarily work smaller, ever. You can always scale down. A bigger doc will allow you smoother lines, more control and yeah if you ever do want to print anything the option's still there.

    And yeah, life drawing. Not only is your anatomy anemic; your coloring could benefit from observation. You don't have much of a handle on light/color. Stay away from dodge/burn/multiply for your shading.

    I'm not saying you have to draw people photorealistically in your strip, but a better understanding of these things will shine through your cartooning the same way your deficiencies are showing through the cracks now. Show us some of your drawing from outside the strip and we can better help improve your art.

    I start at 2709x1158 1200dpi, when it's finished I lower it to 1500px wide and save as PNG for the web. Brush size is 8 for foreground objects, 6-4 for background and small details, with opacity and flow at 100%, Shape Dynamics on. I'm now trying to avoid the smaller detail (1-2 pixels) because it doesn't show up when zoomed out.

    I draw on a 47" TV hooked up to my PC at 1080p. Using a Bamboo MTE-450 and pen with 512 levels of sensitivity. I find myself doing all the linework while zoomed in.

    I've been using a black airbrush for shading on a separate layer above the color, lowering the layer opacity to around 20-30% then applying Gaussian Blur once finished. I have used dodging and burning a few times but wasn't that happy with the results.

    My sketches are very loose so I don't save them. Here's something fairly recent with more a pencil type look though.

    393473_2804756073543_1097851836_3034250_1386975524_n.jpg

    Daemonic on
  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    Here's some older pen and ink...

    10843_1264174519967_1097851836_829379_7987500_n.jpg

    10843_1264174319962_1097851836_829374_2823631_n.jpg

    10843_1264174279961_1097851836_829373_5432028_n.jpg

    10843_1264174199959_1097851836_829371_8060060_n.jpg

  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    Couple oil paintings on canvas and one acrylic on canvas.

    10843_1264174799974_1097851836_829386_2435835_n.jpg

    10843_1264174759973_1097851836_829385_1581814_n.jpg

    10843_1264174679971_1097851836_829383_823290_n.jpg

  • NicNic Registered User regular
    I like this stuff quite a bit, but I think you need to pay more attention to form than detail. Your detailed work is actually quite nice, but the forms underneath them don't often feel 'real' or have that illusion of existence in a physical space.
    The cat oil painting is excellent though.

  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    Broke has a much more stylized comic, which benefits from the fact that it draws from newspaper tradition over digital ones. Scott McClouds pyramid of representation is a good way to get an idea of whats going on, but i think the point of the matter is less about backgrounds or not, and more finding something that's cohesive.

    Right now you have some elements that are at odds with each other, You have a gag a day format that is essentially free of a setting, with two dudes in 90s gear starting up a band. For that I would expect punchy three panel jokes that are more about the visual/immediate gag than about the overall arc of the characters.

    What you seem to want to present is some interesting character dynamics where two guys are starting a band, and offer some humor with it. Well, if you are starting a local band, where they are is pretty important. Two dudes trying to start a geeky-rock band in Alabama is different than just outside New York, but I have no idea where these guys are and what kind of crowds they are encountering. Of course, a lot of details get filled in as the story goes along, but setting is one of the first ones you wan to give the reader, because it gives them context and mood for the story. Since your format doesn't really allow for establishing shots, you may have trouble with this.

    You might try reinventing comics, I have not read it, but I recall people saying that its kind of dated. If its been a while since you read through the other two books, I'd actually recommend sitting down with them again and reading through them. After that, I would take some time to look through what some of the popular/independent comics on the web that aren't gag strips are doing format wise. Think more critically about what you are actually trying to present and open yourself to the idea of experimenting with your methods, your comic will benefit.

    If you want emphasis on the jokes, I would work hard on your timing, expressions and your writing. If you can tell the same joke visually without a huge wad of dialogue its always going to land better. Like in the bar (Which at first glance could just be a table in their garage) you tell me that all these funny things are happening but show none of them. You can indicate sarcasm with an expression rather than going heavy on the bold, you can tell me they are tired and bored by emphasizing that in their poses.

  • brokecrackerbrokecracker Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    If you want emphasis on the jokes, I would work hard on your timing, expressions and your writing. If you can tell the same joke visually without a huge wad of dialogue its always going to land better. Like in the bar (Which at first glance could just be a table in their garage) you tell me that all these funny things are happening but show none of them. You can indicate sarcasm with an expression rather than going heavy on the bold, you can tell me they are tired and bored by emphasizing that in their poses.

    An awesome example of using expressions as punchlines would be Whomp (http://www.whompcomic.com/). The artist/writer who does Whomp posts in the SE++ webcomics thread a lot and got a ton of great advice in this forum too.

  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    If you want emphasis on the jokes, I would work hard on your timing, expressions and your writing. If you can tell the same joke visually without a huge wad of dialogue its always going to land better. Like in the bar (Which at first glance could just be a table in their garage) you tell me that all these funny things are happening but show none of them. You can indicate sarcasm with an expression rather than going heavy on the bold, you can tell me they are tired and bored by emphasizing that in their poses.

    An awesome example of using expressions as punchlines would be Whomp (http://www.whompcomic.com/). The artist/writer who does Whomp posts in the SE++ webcomics thread a lot and got a ton of great advice in this forum too.

    Ronnie is the best thing. I'd recommend taking a look at his thread buried here in the AC and see his progress and the crits given to him for Whomp!, most would probably help you too.

  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    Well, you guys have given me a lot to think about. I get the impression this strip has little redeeming value and that throwing everything out and just starting over may be the best course. If anything it was a useful exercise. This will disappoint a few people that we're following the story but I don't think I can put it out there without being confident that the time spent working on it is worthwhile.

    I will return and post again once some progress has been made. There is a lot of studying and drawing to be done.

    Thanks for your help.

  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Daemonic wrote: »
    Well, you guys have given me a lot to think about. I get the impression this strip has little redeeming value and that throwing everything out and just starting over may be the best course. If anything it was a useful exercise. This will disappoint a few people that we're following the story but I don't think I can put it out there without being confident that the time spent working on it is worthwhile.

    I will return and post again once some progress has been made. There is a lot of studying and drawing to be done.

    Thanks for your help.

    Nonsense, your strip has plenty of value just not enough polish. Work on each strip longer and focus on improving your skills as you do so.

    A prefect example of someone who did this well is Tom Siddel of Gunnerkrigg Court: http://www.gunnerkrigg.com/index2.php

    Look at his current page, then look at his first page. There is a ridiculous improvement over time, but it is all very gradual. Each page he tried something different, pushed himself a little farther, and his artwork improved because of it. Don't quit because people gave you critique, that's what you asked for by posting here. Use that valuable feedback and improve and make better, funner, shinier things.

    Look at that thread linked, also. Ronnie's first Whomp! comics were not great. But he improved after each one. You can too.

    Enc on
  • NicNic Registered User regular
    I took your skull thing to make an example of what I'm talking about with shape over detail. The detail of the skull does add some personal flair, but knowing the shapes a human skull makes is just as important, if not more so. Also the way he's drawn it's difficult to tell if you're going for a profile or 3/4ths view of the head. I gave an example of both to demonstrate the things I'm talking about here:

    zombiething-1.jpg

  • brokecrackerbrokecracker Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Really, don't. No one here said anything close to "Just stop now." One of my favorite things about webcomics is going through the archives and seeing how they got better. This is a place for criticism and growth. People here have shown an intrest and that is better than many get, so don't stop. Besides, there are too many dead threads around here already.

    The best advice I can give you is drop how often you update and draw a lot outside of doing the comic. Start a Tumblr and post all of your non-comic stuff there.

    brokecracker on
  • DaemonicDaemonic Registered User
    I'm not quitting. Just going to find a different approach. I'm thinking, a different panel layout so I can show more of the setting, doing some character studies, and abandoning the gag strip style. Something more narrative but still humorous.

    Those skulls are awesome, Nic!

Sign In or Register to comment.