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A boy's best friend is his [Film Thread]

AstaerethAstaereth In the belly of the beastRegistered User regular
Ah, spring, when a young man's heart turns to romance, and the major releases turn to a pile of shit. You could take this opportunity to catch up on the Oscar nominations in preparation for a ceremony and decisions you'll complain about forever... OR you could watch some amazing classics, the best output of 130-odd years of cinema:

















You are privileged to live in a time with more access to great movies than ever before. If you want to see Romero's "Night of the Living Dead", it is literally right here, a click away. If at 4 in the morning you get an urge to watch a dozen irate males debate someone's guilt or innocence, the internet has you covered. The onus is on YOU to determine how you will use these infinite riches. Expand your horizons, ladies and gentlemen. Or argue for another 100 pages about the motherfucking Fright Night remake. The choice... is yours, for this is your MOVIE THREAD!

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Posts

  • NoughtNought Registered User regular
    When seeing black and white movies it always amazes me how crystal clear the image is. It's not hard to see why colours didn't kill off all b&w movies.

    On fire
    .
    Island. Being on fire.
  • KanaKana Registered User regular
    Nought wrote: »
    When seeing black and white movies it always amazes me how crystal clear the image is. It's not hard to see why colours didn't kill off all b&w movies.

    In general color sort of killed the quality of cinematography for a while when things were first changing over. Everyone was so obsessed over mastering the technologies and techniques for color shooting in color that a lot of the basics were sort of neglected for years.

    A trap is for fish: when you've got the fish, you can forget the trap. A snare is for rabbits: when you've got the rabbit, you can forget the snare. Words are for meaning: when you've got the meaning, you can forget the words.
  • AtomikaAtomika a sour and coarse bogborne hellfruit Registered User regular
    Kana wrote: »
    Nought wrote: »
    When seeing black and white movies it always amazes me how crystal clear the image is. It's not hard to see why colours didn't kill off all b&w movies.

    In general color sort of killed the quality of cinematography for a while when things were first changing over. Everyone was so obsessed over mastering the technologies and techniques for color shooting in color that a lot of the basics were sort of neglected for years.

    It's basically second verse, same as the first, for digital film and CGI these days.

    People like Lucas and Zemeckis got lost in a chase of expanding the toolbox, forgetting what the tools were actually supposed to be in service of.

    Harry Dresdenh3nduB_R
  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    Kana wrote: »
    Nought wrote: »
    When seeing black and white movies it always amazes me how crystal clear the image is. It's not hard to see why colours didn't kill off all b&w movies.

    In general color sort of killed the quality of cinematography for a while when things were first changing over. Everyone was so obsessed over mastering the technologies and techniques for color shooting in color that a lot of the basics were sort of neglected for years.

    Pretty much the same thing that happened with 3d tech recently, and is almost surely going to happen with the whole 48FPS tech used on The Hobbit. I'd imagine the same thing happened when they introduced sound, but it's hard to tell.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
  • TransporterTransporter Registered User regular
    So, I binged and saw The Raid:redemption and Dredd.

    Both utterly fantastic movies. I'm pretty sure The raid had the most intimidating man under 5 feet in the history of Cinema.

    But Dredd, oh my god I cannot get over how fantastic Dredd was. Stone cold drop into the movie with all the backstory you need told to you in one minute. Urban KILLED THE SHIT out of the role, not only by not ever showing his face, but seriously emoting with only the lower part of his face and nailing actually complicated emotional ranges.

    Also, the female lead was fantastic. They could have copped out and had her be an audience substitute, but nope. They play it straight, with her reactions being contained within the framework of the movie.

    The only negative was the lead villian. And it wasn't the character itself. The actress was woefully out of her depth, however, she does manage to hold it together, and come out as truly terrifying in a few bits.

    Overall, it was easily one of my favorite 2012 movies beside Cabin in the Woods and The Avengers.

  • LordSolarMachariusLordSolarMacharius Red wine with fish Registered User regular
    One bit of Dredd that I really liked was when Judge Anderson...
    ... runs into the one corrupt Judge near the end, and actually does the correct thing (keeps her gun up, uses her psychic powers to verify, shoots) rather then some bullshit to create an action scene.

    As a viewer, I felt the movie respected me. Which was nice.

    Harry DresdenMalReynoldsJacobkoshshorttiminA Dabble Of Theloniush3ndu
  • DanHibikiDanHibiki Registered User regular
    Really hope the good Blu-ray/dvd/digital sales of Dredd warrant a sequel.

  • TexiKenTexiKen nin nin Registered User regular
    Dredd DVD sales are that good? That's kind of a nice surprise.

  • So It GoesSo It Goes We keep moving...Registered User regular
    Shoot I forgot to grab Dredd out of the redbox at the store.

    Gonna watch that.

  • DramDram Old Salt Registered User regular


    I really hope they do more of this...

    emp123roxynova
  • AstaerethAstaereth In the belly of the beastRegistered User regular
    see317 wrote: »
    Kana wrote: »
    Nought wrote: »
    When seeing black and white movies it always amazes me how crystal clear the image is. It's not hard to see why colours didn't kill off all b&w movies.

    In general color sort of killed the quality of cinematography for a while when things were first changing over. Everyone was so obsessed over mastering the technologies and techniques for color shooting in color that a lot of the basics were sort of neglected for years.

    Pretty much the same thing that happened with 3d tech recently, and is almost surely going to happen with the whole 48FPS tech used on The Hobbit. I'd imagine the same thing happened when they introduced sound, but it's hard to tell.

    The exact same thing did happen when they introduced sound--cameras at the time were extremely fucking noisy, and for a while you had movies that were shot with the camera permanently incased in a soundproofed room. When they wanted to change the angle, they had to move the room, which was expensive and time consuming as balls, so we went from the fluid, expressive cinematography of, say, Sunrise (please ignore the shitty music):



    ...back to the origins of cinema when it was still thought of in the same way as theater, a fixed perspective mimicking the stage's proscenium arch. For example, the follow-up to The Jazz Singer, the Singing Fool. You can see in this clip (please ignore the blackface) that not only are all of the shots fixed in place (no way to put to soundproof booth on a dolly), but there are very few angles represented--mostly the different size shots of Jolson, the reverse on the audience, and a few cutaways that at least establish the spatial relationships. (Somewhat; we get the shot from behind Jolson looking out at the audience, but a less constrained film would probably have also included a shot over the backstage couple's shoulders as they watch Jolson. As is, the scene skates by on the set production and Kuleshoving.) The film resorts to other techniques in order to get the emotion of the scene across, like the superimposition of the child's face, but mostly relies on Jolson's heartfelt performance. The one interesting shot cinematographically comes at the end, when the camera places us in the midst of the standing ovation, a nice use of depth... but still along that straight-forward angle that they're using the whole time.



    Within a few short years, though, cameras could be housed in bulky but moveable sound-proof cases, and things started to open up again. Take a look at this clip from 1931's The Public Enemy. You can see the difference throughout. Not only is there are a welcome variation in angles (including a nice low-angle showing the gangsters' intimidating power) but the camera moves (specifically following Cagney in either short, violent jerks or that smooth, controlled push in as he walks behind the bar, hitting all the spigots) and, more importantly, feels placed inside the action (once even peering over the bar), as opposed to the theatrical, detached observation of The Singing Fool.

    Finding ways to work around the logistical limitations of new tools isn't the only thing artists have to do; they also have to figure out how to best use those tools for creative expression. Artistic expression is the difference between any Ted Turner-colorized piece of shit and, say, Vertigo, with its expressive use of color to create and enhance emotional relationships. Hitchcock, the consummate technical genius (along with Kubrick, perhaps the two most accomplished craftsmen in the history of film), did this with multiple new technologies, from the large film magazines that allowed him to make an apparently one-take film, Rope; to his work at the advent of sound with the film Blackmail:



    Perhaps the most famous example, along with Fritz Lang's M (which excelled at using off-screen sound to evoke dread, in particular the unseen killer whistling "In the Halls of the Mountain King"), that clip from Blackmail shows one of the first distinguished uses of sound to express subjectivity rather than the "if you see it, you hear it" objectivity of sound up to that point. The woman, who IIRC has committed the murder they're talking about, starts to hear the word "knife" and "knives" to the exclusion of all other dialogue, because that's all she can think about.

    Hitchcock also had a chance to find creative expression through the use of 3D with his Dial M for Murder (1954). If you're at all interested in that, this article by the brilliant film writers Bordwell and Thompson goes into it with much more depth (pun intended) and skill than I can.

    But personally I feel that while today's modern filmmakers have solved any gross issues with 3D in terms of the technical ability to integrate the process with traditional filmmaking techniques, we have yet to really take advantage of 3D's possibilities for creative expression--either in the Wizard of Oz sense (why hasn't there been a fantasy film yet whose "Kansas" is in 2D and whose "Oz" is in 3D?) or in the subtle way that Hitchcock used it back in the 50s, highlighting objects, building connections, and playing with variable depths. Until today's filmmakers learn to use 3D in way that enhances the story, rather than merely not detracting from it, the technique is doomed to fade back into obscurity, alongside Smell-o-Vision, Sensurround, and William Castle's Tinglers.

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  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    Astaereth wrote: »
    But personally I feel that while today's modern filmmakers have solved any gross issues with 3D in terms of the technical ability to integrate the process with traditional filmmaking techniques, we have yet to really take advantage of 3D's possibilities for creative expression--either in the Wizard of Oz sense (why hasn't there been a fantasy film yet whose "Kansas" is in 2D and whose "Oz" is in 3D?) or in the subtle way that Hitchcock used it back in the 50s, highlighting objects, building connections, and playing with variable depths. Until today's filmmakers learn to use 3D in way that enhances the story, rather than merely not detracting from it, the technique is doomed to fade back into obscurity, alongside Smell-o-Vision, Sensurround, and William Castle's Tinglers.

    Does the TRON sequel count? I mean, it wasn't exactly Oz, but everything in the real world parts of the movie was in 2D, it only turned 3D after Flynn got sucked into the system.
    The problem with relying on 3D as a story telling device is that you can't make people see it in 3D, so inevitably some of the audience isn't going to get the full story. It'd be like watching Wizard of Oz on a black and white TV screen. Without color, the first steps into Oz aren't nearly as magical and the entire presentation kind of falls apart, it's still a good story but the visual impact that Oz is a different world gets lost in the translation.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
  • KanaKana Registered User regular
    Yeah, when sound came into the pictures shit went waaay backwards for a while. I don't think anyone filmed action as well as Buster Keaton did in the 20s for what? At least 30 years?

    Also, via Grantland, this movie sounds awesome. And fucking horrible. At the same time. It's quite the write-up, anyway.
    Grantland wrote:
    One last movie to report on before all the other movies start playing. Crystal Fairy. Oh man. This movie. A.k.a. Crystal Fairy & the Magic Cactus and 2012. Starring Michael Cera. The magic cactus in question is the mythic San Pedro cactus, source of mescaline. Cera plays a drug-fiend Ugly American on a narcotics tour of Chile. He’s given to misquoting Aldous Huxley’s The Doors of Perception and passive-aggressively terrorizing his genial Chilean friends, played by director Sebastian Silva’s three brothers, Juan Andres, Jose Miguel, and Agustin. Gaby Hoffmann, of Field of Dreams child stardom fame, plays Cera's eventual foil: She’s a fellow American, an earth mother, as pushy in her pursuit of nudity and free love as Cera is in his single-minded quest for a hunk of hallucinogenic cactus and the mute obedience of his friends.

    It’s hard to overstate how unpleasant Cera is in the film. He talks constantly, solipsistically, a steady stream of muttered insults and outright lies. It’s a remarkable performance: ugly and naturalistic, and Silva frames it as such, with a handheld camera and tight, so that we’re stuck hanging out with the guy too. People were walking out of the theater. Silva apparently shot the film in 12 days, and it shows, but in the right way. It’s mumblecore if mumblecore were possessed by evil hateful demons. It turns Cera’s mumbling affability and charm against itself. The three Silva brothers onscreen are not well differentiated, but they have presence, charm, a kind of ease with the camera on them. Hoffman has a huge bloom of pubic hair that the director returns to more than once; she wanders the hills by the beach where the five of them ultimately end up, high on mescaline and nude but for her sneakers, trying to resurrect the furry body of a dead rabbit. The group falls apart and comes back together at the end, whispering shared traumas by a beach bonfire. It’s a maddening, annoying, viscerally direct film that is probably my favorite thing I’ve seen in 2013 so far, not that I’ve seen much

    A trap is for fish: when you've got the fish, you can forget the trap. A snare is for rabbits: when you've got the rabbit, you can forget the snare. Words are for meaning: when you've got the meaning, you can forget the words.
  • AstaerethAstaereth In the belly of the beastRegistered User regular
    edited January 2013
    see317 wrote: »
    Astaereth wrote: »
    But personally I feel that while today's modern filmmakers have solved any gross issues with 3D in terms of the technical ability to integrate the process with traditional filmmaking techniques, we have yet to really take advantage of 3D's possibilities for creative expression--either in the Wizard of Oz sense (why hasn't there been a fantasy film yet whose "Kansas" is in 2D and whose "Oz" is in 3D?) or in the subtle way that Hitchcock used it back in the 50s, highlighting objects, building connections, and playing with variable depths. Until today's filmmakers learn to use 3D in way that enhances the story, rather than merely not detracting from it, the technique is doomed to fade back into obscurity, alongside Smell-o-Vision, Sensurround, and William Castle's Tinglers.

    Does the TRON sequel count? I mean, it wasn't exactly Oz, but everything in the real world parts of the movie was in 2D, it only turned 3D after Flynn got sucked into the system.
    The problem with relying on 3D as a story telling device is that you can't make people see it in 3D, so inevitably some of the audience isn't going to get the full story. It'd be like watching Wizard of Oz on a black and white TV screen. Without color, the first steps into Oz aren't nearly as magical and the entire presentation kind of falls apart, it's still a good story but the visual impact that Oz is a different world gets lost in the translation.

    True, and that is exactly what happened with me. I didn't watch Tron: Legacy in 3D, but it worked anyway because they remembered to use more than just 3D to effect that transition.

    (Which I would argue Oz does as well--in addition to the Technicolor, the cinematography "opens up" into longer, wider, denser shots, the production design changes, and the music kicks in. Oz doesn't work as well in black and white and I'm sure Tron would have been better in 3D, but both movies still work either way.)

    --

    Michael Cera actually has two movies at Sundance right now where he plays a terrible, terrible person. Good on him for pushing his range.

    Astaereth on
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  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    TexiKen wrote: »
    Dredd DVD sales are that good? That's kind of a nice surprise.

    It should be a cult hit on dvd/blu-ray IMO.

  • DanHibikiDanHibiki Registered User regular
    TexiKen wrote: »
    Dredd DVD sales are that good? That's kind of a nice surprise.

    http://investors.lionsgate.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=62796&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1776610&highlight

    seems like it

  • Sangheili91Sangheili91 Registered User regular
    bookmarkin' dis thread right hurr

    I finally caught up with Being John Malkovich tonight. That was the most wholly creative film I've seen in ages.

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  • EuphoriacEuphoriac Registered User regular
    So, I binged and saw The Raid:redemption and Dredd.

    Both utterly fantastic movies. I'm pretty sure The raid had the most intimidating man under 5 feet in the history of Cinema.

    But Dredd, oh my god I cannot get over how fantastic Dredd was. Stone cold drop into the movie with all the backstory you need told to you in one minute. Urban KILLED THE SHIT out of the role, not only by not ever showing his face, but seriously emoting with only the lower part of his face and nailing actually complicated emotional ranges.

    Also, the female lead was fantastic. They could have copped out and had her be an audience substitute, but nope. They play it straight, with her reactions being contained within the framework of the movie.

    The only negative was the lead villian. And it wasn't the character itself. The actress was woefully out of her depth, however, she does manage to hold it together, and come out as truly terrifying in a few bits.

    Overall, it was easily one of my favorite 2012 movies beside Cabin in the Woods and The Avengers.

    This post here; all of it, is right out of my own damn brain! I saw Dredd last weekend and honestly it's my joint-favourite movie out of 2012 with Cabin.

    I'm watching the Raid this weekend, and I've heard alot of good things about it; now I'm even more pumped!

  • wanderingwandering Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Mission: Watch All The Movies Nominated for Best Animated Picture is now complete.

    ParaNorman is still fun and moving and gosh is it gorgeous. I found myself walking up to the TV to take in the detail as if the movie was a painting in a gallery.

    Pirates! is pretty fun. Evil Queen Victoria is a pretty great villain. I like how, unlike the heroes in the Pirates of the Caribbean movies, the heroes in this movie do piratey things, like raiding ships and making someone walk the plank. In a world where half of the people in the U.S. don't believe in evolution I don't know if I would have chosen to make Darwin into a sniveling jerk, on the other hand a more respectful treatment probably would've resulted in a less interesting character. The title of the book - "The Pirates! in an Adventure with Scientists" - is much better than the title of the movie - "The Pirates! Band of Misfits".

    I didn't dislike Frankenweenie but I wanted to like it more than I did, because I really like the concept and also I'm impressed that a black-and-white movie done in an outmoded animation style got made.

    I'm glad people are still making stop motion movies and pushing the medium forward with new technology like 3d printing - there's magic to taking real actual objects and making them move impossibly.

    wandering on
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  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    Nought wrote: »
    When seeing black and white movies it always amazes me how crystal clear the image is. It's not hard to see why colours didn't kill off all b&w movies.
    I've been impressed by some of the Criterion Blu-rays of black and white movies - I didn't expect films that old to look that crisp these days. Not a single one where I thought, "Well, I might as well have bought the DVD..."

    webp-net-resizeimage.jpg
    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus premium Registered User regular
    Thirith wrote: »
    Nought wrote: »
    When seeing black and white movies it always amazes me how crystal clear the image is. It's not hard to see why colours didn't kill off all b&w movies.
    I've been impressed by some of the Criterion Blu-rays of black and white movies - I didn't expect films that old to look that crisp these days. Not a single one where I thought, "Well, I might as well have bought the DVD..."

    People forget that 35mm has been used for a long time.

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  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    It's not just that, though - in many cases the original is in a pretty bad state or non-existent. The care they take to remaster the (sometimes fairly obscure) films is breathtaking.

    webp-net-resizeimage.jpg
    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    edited January 2013
    Excellent OP, Astaereth. I approve. :^:

    And now that we have the ability to convert mod directives into iron forum law,

    Geth, the word pretentious is forbidden.

    Jacobkosh on
    Peter EbelAtomikaB_R
  • GethGeth Legion Perseus VeilRegistered User, Moderator, Penny Arcade Staff, Vanilla Staff vanilla
    Affirmative Jacobkosh. "pretentious" is forbidden in this thread.

    B_R
  • AstaerethAstaereth In the belly of the beastRegistered User regular
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Excellent OP, Astaereth. I approve. :^:

    Thanks!

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  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    edited January 2013
    So I saw The Hobbit tonight.

    There are a couple times where I feel like Peter Jackson's background in comedy horror movies doesn't serve him well. Lots of Dutch-angle shots of dwarves getting food and liquid all over themselves that kind of got off-putting after a while. Also the bit with
    Bilbo getting used as a Kleenex

    was just like come on. And I have a general issue with these movies and their weird thing about having people fall for apparently miles and bounce off sharp rocks like cartoon characters and arrive fine at the end.

    But those are all quibbles. I actually thought it was pretty fantastically paced, and I liked the way the side-stories and flashbacks were used to break up the travel sequences.

    On the writing front, I was deeply worried that the new material would be stupid. A lot of the worst bits in the LotR movies were the made-up parts. Right up until filming they were going to have Return of the King end with a big swordfight between Aragorn and Sauron, for instance, which is just...what? But they pulled the new stuff off really well here, and got a part for my favorite Doctor Who in the process. And more importantly, they really distinguished and characterized the Dwarves so I could tell at least most of them apart. Even the book only kinda sorta does that.

    Jacobkosh on
    Linespider5
  • wanderingwandering Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    A lot of the worst bits in the LotR movies were the made-up parts. Right up until filming they were going to have Return of the King end with a big swordfight between Aragorn and Sauron, for instance, which is just...what?
    It finally clicked that the reason they wanted to do that is Aragorn is Isilidur's heir and has Isildur's sword and so it would tie in to Isilidur fighting Sauron.

    Not that that makes it a good idea.

    (It also took me a long time to realize why Luke Skywalker's original name was "Starkiller".)

    wandering on
    atcwebmqawjl.png
    Jacobkosh
  • FakefauxFakefaux Cóiste Bodhar Driving John McCain to meet some Iraqis who'd very much like to make his acquaintanceRegistered User regular
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    On the writing front, I was deeply worried that the new material would be stupid. A lot of the worst bits in the LotR movies were the made-up parts. Right up until filming they were going to have Return of the King end with a big swordfight between Aragorn and Sauron, for instance, which is just...what? But they pulled the new stuff off really well here, and got a part for my favorite Doctor Who in the process. And more importantly, they really distinguished and characterized the Dwarves so I could tell at least most of them apart. Even the book only kinda sorta does that.

    Some of the new writing I liked. The scene where Gandalf talks to Bilbo in front of the fireplace, with the story about his ancestor, borrowed some information from the book and put it together in a good new scene.

    Other stuff just felt kind of fanfic-ish, especially when they had to improvise. Parts of the White Council meeting, some of the Radagast scenes, the played up "Dwarves hate Elves" stuff, and especially the Azog vs Thorin subplot. I could see where they were drawing inspiration from, but I felt they missed the tone.

  • DeaderinredDeaderinred Registered User regular
    damn thats a great op, a lot of great fucking scenes.

  • Capt HowdyCapt Howdy Registered User regular
    Thirith wrote: »
    Nought wrote: »
    When seeing black and white movies it always amazes me how crystal clear the image is. It's not hard to see why colours didn't kill off all b&w movies.
    I've been impressed by some of the Criterion Blu-rays of black and white movies - I didn't expect films that old to look that crisp these days. Not a single one where I thought, "Well, I might as well have bought the DVD..."

    They did an amazing job on the Godzilla bluray. I've seen that movie too many times, and was still blown away with the time and effort they put into the transfer.

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  • AtomikaAtomika a sour and coarse bogborne hellfruit Registered User regular
    @Jacobkosh

    One thing that Jackson has shown in the past that gives me a little hope is his ability to keep his ego in check when it comes to killing his darlings.

    Both The Two Towers and The Return of the King could have been very different movies; the former originally had a subplot about Arwen rallying elves of Rivendell to join up with Haldir's Lothlorien elves at the Battle of Helm's Deep, while the latter had a subplot about the Sauron returning to full power by the time the Gondor/Rohan forces reached the Black Gate.

    Jackson has cited the internet uproar over leaked details to be one of the deciding factors in this, but I think he ultimately realized that these things changed the dynamics of the film for the poorer.


    In Jackson's defense, he always hated the plot device where the disgraced Army of the Dead wins the day at Pellenor Fields. He felt it cheap and undercutting of the gravitas for the fight for Gondor, and was long a champion of the omitted storyline where Aragon quietly rebuilds the alliances of the northern Dunedain and they rally to him at Pellenor.

    Personally, I think that would have been much more satisfying of Aragorn's arc than the Dimholt army's assistance, but the powers that be felt that the Dead looked a lot cooler and would be a bigger crowdpleaser.

  • KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    wandering wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    A lot of the worst bits in the LotR movies were the made-up parts. Right up until filming they were going to have Return of the King end with a big swordfight between Aragorn and Sauron, for instance, which is just...what?
    It finally clicked that the reason they wanted to do that is Aragorn is Isilidur's heir and has Isildur's sword and so it would tie in to Isilidur fighting Sauron.

    Not that that makes it a good idea.

    (It also took me a long time to realize why Luke Skywalker's original name was "Starkiller".)

    I heard a rumor that the swordfighting Sauron was going to look like Kate Winslet?

    Anyway, I'm glad that (a) they came to their senses, and (b) they shot the fight before that, so they had footage of Aragorn fighting that they could use to have him fight that troll.

  • DeaderinredDeaderinred Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    that wasnt lukes original name, it was anakins (who was basically luke back then anyway but meh)

    Deaderinred on
  • quantumcat42quantumcat42 Registered User regular
    wandering wrote: »
    Mission: Watch All The Movies Nominated for Best Animated Picture is now complete.
    I'm really happy with the animated feature picks this year; I loved all five. Paranorman especially... the off-kilter production design was delightful. That was one movie I felt was worth seeing in 3D, just to get my spatial-brain-feelers all over the set.

    And yeah, "An Adventure with Scientists" is a more interesting title than "Band of Misfits"; it was released with that title in the UK, it's too bad we didn't get that on this side of the pond.

  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    I'm kind of surprised with all the other talks of games being translated to films, there's never been a hollywood attempt at Dead Space or even Call of Duty. COD I could see because the popularity isn't the story its the multi, but Dead Space is all about gorrific story, but I could see hollywood screwing it up quite soundly.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

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  • AtomikaAtomika a sour and coarse bogborne hellfruit Registered User regular
    Dead Space would be a great movie, but only if they hewed closely to the anti-religious allegory.

    Horror movies always work so much better when there's a point to them. Otherwise, it's yet another "maniacs want to turn people into zombies" story that the Japanese so dearly love for some inexplicable reason.

    Apothe0sis
  • DanWeinoDanWeino Registered User regular
    @Jacobkosh

    Personally, I think that would have been much more satisfying of Aragorn's arc than the Dimholt army's assistance, but the powers that be felt that the Dead looked a lot cooler and would be a bigger crowdpleaser.

    Same, when I saw it the first time it just looked silly and ruined any tension. There could of been a million orcs and it wouldn't have mattered. Either make it so the ghosts could be vanquished somehow, and it actually became a fight, or not have so many of them so the battle wasn't over in seconds. It made the whole battle kind of pointless.


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  • AtomikaAtomika a sour and coarse bogborne hellfruit Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    DanWeino wrote: »
    @Jacobkosh

    Personally, I think that would have been much more satisfying of Aragorn's arc than the Dimholt army's assistance, but the powers that be felt that the Dead looked a lot cooler and would be a bigger crowdpleaser.

    Same, when I saw it the first time it just looked silly and ruined any tension. There could of been a million orcs and it wouldn't have mattered. Either make it so the ghosts could be vanquished somehow, and it actually became a fight, or not have so many of them so the battle wasn't over in seconds. It made the whole battle kind of pointless.

    It also raises the never-answered question of why Aragorn didn't just suck up his pride and call the army to his side before it ever got that far.

    Much of LOTR, plotwise, is predicated on Aragorn being kind of a coward in regards to his ancestry and duties as High King. If he would have just taken Anduril to the Dimholt, gotten their support, gone around to Rohan and Gondor and given them a, "Hey, I'm king now, so let's go clear out all of Mordor until nothing is left except greasy brown patches in the grass," speech years ago, shit wouldn't have had to come to all the walking and ring bearing.

    Atomika on
  • metaghostmetaghost Registered User regular
    Dead Space would be a great movie, but only if they hewed closely to the anti-religious allegory.

    Horror movies always work so much better when there's a point to them. Otherwise, it's yet another "maniacs want to turn people into zombies" story that the Japanese so dearly love for some inexplicable reason.

    I've never really played the games (other than a brief time spent with Dead Space 2), but somehow I think we all know that if they tried to adapt Dead Space to film it would be nigh indistinguishable from Event Horizon with liberal attempts at reproducing scenes from the The Thing (only IN SPACE). This is not to say that Dead Space's story content and context isn't obviously derivative of the many Sci-Fi/Horror films of the late 20th century, but that it would stand little chance of not being reduced to only its most derivative and easily marketed content.

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  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    If it was event horizon meets the thing than it would basically be Dead Space.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
    Dark Raven X
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