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A boy's best friend is his [Film Thread]

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  • Robos A Go GoRobos A Go Go Registered User regular
    Wow, The Caller ended up being hugely disappointing. So many ways to fuck up a person's life
    by messing with his or her past, but all that happens are a few simple deaths and the main character getting some burn scars.

    I think the writer must've had a hard time figuring out how to get jump scares out of a story where the protagonist and antagonist never meet face to face, which is why it devolves into a slasher at the end.

    I like how they wrapped up the subplot about the abusive ex, though.

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    I think Abrahms will probably do a good job if they get him a good script.

    I'm optomistic for the new Star Trek. I hope to be able to like it without reservations.

    AManFromEarthemp123
  • emp123emp123 Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Since I decided paying $18.50 for a movie wasnt a travesty and saw the first 9 minutes of Star Trek, I think so far it looks good but some of the fan nods are kinda...eh. Im still probably going to see it in IMAX 3D though so.

    emp123 on
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  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    Has anyone (Atomic Ross, I'm looking at you) posted Film Crit Hulk's discussion of Tobe Hooper and the man's lack of understanding of cinematography? Haven't seen Les Miserables yet, but what Hulk says definitely holds oh-so-true for John Adams. And as he rightly points out, it's a crying shame, because Hooper is very good at getting great performances from his casts.

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    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Yup, it was posted last thread.

  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    Ah. Guess I missed it.

    And to make this post slightly less irrelevant: I watched Life of Pi yesterday. Can't say I'm a big fan of the film as a whole, but at the same time I would blame the original novel for all the film's faults. Ang Lee's adaptation is probably the best you can make of the novel - and visually, it's quite stunning. There was one scene where the CGI felt entirely off, pretty much at the end where the tiger's walking down the beach, but other than that it's a great-looking film.

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    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • KanaKana Registered User regular
    I just have no idea what the appeal of Film Hulk is on these forums, the dude's giving out pretty basic analysis about things that better writers have already written - without the annoying-as-fuck writing style. Every article of his that I've seen linked are fairly broad, shallow critiques of complex topics, where he's free to unload on various folks' lack of skills from safely behind his anonymous persona and armed with a few semesters of film school. There's such better stuff out there.

    A trap is for fish: when you've got the fish, you can forget the trap. A snare is for rabbits: when you've got the rabbit, you can forget the snare. Words are for meaning: when you've got the meaning, you can forget the words.
  • AstaerethAstaereth In the belly of the beastRegistered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Kana wrote: »
    I just have no idea what the appeal of Film Hulk is on these forums, the dude's giving out pretty basic analysis about things that better writers have already written - without the annoying-as-fuck writing style. Every article of his that I've seen linked are fairly broad, shallow critiques of complex topics, where he's free to unload on various folks' lack of skills from safely behind his anonymous persona and armed with a few semesters of film school. There's such better stuff out there.

    Link it, please! Seriously. There's a dearth of passing around real, interesting criticism in these threads.

    Edit: Also, I unload on various folks' lack of skills, have an anonymous persona, and finished film school. What does that make me?

    Astaereth on
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  • KanaKana Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Jim Emerson's blog has some great breakdowns on movies, like No Country For Old Men.
    Chigurh often mirrors his victims before he kills them. They face him and they face their own mortality, eye-to-eye. He often violates their space before he violates their flesh, and it's deeply disturbing: the handcuffs around the neck, the tube to the head of the motorist, his shadow darkening the hall space under Llewelyn's door, feet on the bed in the hotel room of his nemesis Carson Wells (Woody Harrelson). Wells is dead as soon as Chigurh looks away from him, at the ringing phone, where the man he's really stalking is on the other end of the line.

    The sense of intimate incursion is especially unsettling when he enters the trailer of Llewelyn and Carla Jean. We've been here before, the night Llewelyn comes home from his hunt, seen him take a beer out of the refrigerator and plop down on the couch (shot head-on) next to Carla Jean. It's a funny, "Raising Arizona" kind of domestic image. But when Chigurh enters this mobile home in the daylight, after they've fled, we watch him take a bottle of milk from the fridge and sit down in the center of the couch from nearly the same camera angles. He's insinuating himself into their head-space. He drinks their milk, and it's obscene. He may as well be drinking their blood. (Later, a cat drinking a puddle of spilled milk will provide all the visual information we need to know that there's a corpse in a pool of blood behind a hotel counter. And it's more upsetting than seeing the gory details.) Moments after Chigurh has disappeared, Sheriff Bell and Deputy Wendell arrive to inspect the scene, but this time the angles are different. We're just seeing what they see, and nothing more.

    David Bordwell, writer of movie textbooks, has his own blog, with lots of good articles. Especially check out the list of "Readers Favorite Entries" on the right sidebar:

    http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/2012/08/19/nolan-vs-nolan/
    http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/2011/02/14/watching-you-watch-there-will-be-blood/
    http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/2010/09/15/bond-vs-chan-jackie-shows-how-its-done/
    http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/2011/01/30/the-social-network-faces-behind-facebook/

    There's Clothes on Film, which is, well, about clothes on film. Quality and type of articles varies pretty widely, but it's very informative.
    Carefully selected attire is an essential part of the world of Inception. Costume designer Jeffery Kurland (for he designed all the suits in the film) has utilised fabrics of varying weight and colour, plus a blending of classic and modernistic styles to establish setting and differentiate protagonists in slight but distinguishable ways.

    Note Michael Caine’s outfit of tweed jacket and Nehru collar shirt with popper buttons. As Miles, a university professor who may be vital, Caine’s costume subtly informs proceedings with a merging of old and new (likewise echoing his and Cobb’s relationship). It is not implicitly stated that Inception is set in the future, however Miles’ clothing is not quite ‘now’, although, paradoxically, it could be. In other words there is a suggestion that the story could take place in the near future, or even that Miles’ appearance is actually part of Cobb’s amalgamated dream state. Or more radically Miles could just be an older gentlemen who dresses a little kookily. Point being, there are no absolutes in Inception. And with this in mind don’t neglect to register what Cobb’s children are wearing either…

    And there's Soundworks, which has lots of cool little featurettes about sound design

    http://soundworkscollection.com/videos/garyhecker

    EDIT: Also if you want forums, there's Roger Deakins homepage's forum, or cinematography.com, both of which have a fair share of professionals posting and answering questions.

    Kana on
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    Linespider5
  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    @Kana: I'm not a big fan of Jim Emerson (yet), mainly because nothing that I've read of it grabs me. What I like a lot about Film Crit Hulk is that the guy so obviously loves film, and he loves having an emotional reaction to film. The articles I've read by Emerson all felt rather anodyne; I have no problem with more academic criticism (hey, I spent several years studying and then teaching literary criticism, so I must get *something* out of it), but I've always found that the sort of criticism most engaging that also communicates excitement and passion for a medium.

    Based on the Film Crit Hulk posts that I've enjoyed most, I definitely don't get your "broad, shallow critiques of complex topics". I'd agree that his topics aren't necessarily deep, but that in itself doesn't yet make his writing shallow. I'd say that Hulk's critique of Hooper's use of the camera is spot-on, addressing the issue engagingly and intelligently. Same for his thoughts on plot holes. I definitely agree that his shtik can be annoying, though.

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    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • AtomikaAtomika Brought to you by Technicolor™ Registered User regular
    @Thirith

    Tobe Hooper's Les Miserables would have been something decidedly different than what we got, I reckon.

    BolthornLoveIsUnity
  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    Heh. Freudian slip or what? The Paris Guillotine Massacre does have a certain ring to it, though, doesn't it?

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    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
    GreasyKidsStuff
  • Capt HowdyCapt Howdy Registered User regular
    Did Disney at least email Paul Verhoeven to see if he wanted a piece of the Star Wars pie?

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  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    Capt Howdy wrote: »
    Did Disney at least email Paul Verhoeven to see if he wanted a piece of the Star Wars pie?

    I don't think ultra violence and tits are really what Star Wars needs.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
  • AtomikaAtomika Brought to you by Technicolor™ Registered User regular
    Thirith wrote: »
    Heh. Freudian slip or what? The Paris Guillotine Massacre does have a certain ring to it, though, doesn't it?

    Enjolras and the ABC would have faired far better at the barricades had they all been armed with chainsaws.


    It's science.

    Sangheili91
  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    Paul Verhoeven is one of those directors that doesn't do anything for me. Admittedly, I haven't seen all that many of his films, but Total Recall, Starship Troopers, Basic Instinct... I came away from all of them thinking that they were cheesy, B-movie trash. With more wit and subtext than your usual B-movie cheese, but also less clever than Verhoeven's defenders seem to think. Then again, perhaps I'm too much of a bourgeois prude.

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    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    Verhoven has defenders? I mean outside of Robocop being a really good satire of the 80's he does basically make b movie trash.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Especially Starship Troopers does, and Basic Instinct was treated (at least by some critics) as something beyond the trashy sex thriller it was. Something more transgressive and meaningful.

    Thirith on
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    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • Capt HowdyCapt Howdy Registered User regular
    Preacher wrote: »
    Capt Howdy wrote: »
    Did Disney at least email Paul Verhoeven to see if he wanted a piece of the Star Wars pie?

    I don't think ultra violence and tits are really what Star Wars needs.

    Would have helped the prequels.
    No it wouldn't have

    Verhoeven made Robocop, Starship Troopers, and Showgirls. Excellence, Great, and the mother of all horrible guilty pleasures that don't require an internet connection.

    Give the man a shot. Let him at least direct one of the TV episodes.

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  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    There are several directors I'd rather take on anything star wars before I'd want Verhoven. That's such a random choice. Hell I'd take Fincher over him and Star Wars is so outside of Finchers wheelhouse he would probably be awful with it.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
  • MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    Hmm. For tonight go see Mama or Hansel and Gretel? I'm pretty sure I won't be disappointed by the first, but won't care if I am about the second.

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  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    I'm seeing Hansel And Gretel, because this is one of the few periods of time in a year you can see back to back movies with Peter Stomare.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
  • ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited January 2013
    Verhoeven is probably not nearly so awesome as his more vocal supporters might claim, but the dude can make a fun movie. Starship Troopers and Total Recall were both cheesy premises with campy production values, but they both had an energy and a self-awareness that made them a joy to watch. Nobody in those movies thinks they're making high art, but you can tell they're all having fun with it, and the films contain some fun action pieces and characters that you can comfortably root for.

    Robocop was just a plain ol great movie, which may have been a single spark of brilliance or just dumb luck, but whatever.

    Showgirls was awful and had no redeeming qualities unless you just really needed to fill in that space on your Naked Saved By the Bell Alumni Bingo card.

    ElJeffe on
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  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    She was also ugly naked, something about her body just didn't look good when the clothes came off. Might have been the pool sex with Kyle Mclaughlan, I don't know, I'm not a sexpert.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
  • TehSpectreTehSpectre @PixelateJake on TwitterRegistered User regular
    Malkor wrote: »
    Hmm. For tonight go see Mama or Hansel and Gretel? I'm pretty sure I won't be disappointed by the first, but won't care if I am about the second.
    I posted a mini review of Mama near the end of the last movie thread if it'll help.

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    Malkor
  • Capt HowdyCapt Howdy Registered User regular
    I remember Verhoeven swearing off ever making American movies again. Can't for the life of me remember why. Oh well.

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  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    ...the films contain ... characters that you can comfortably root for.
    That may be part of why I haven't really enjoyed any Verhoeven films - I didn't care one bit about any of the characters. There's something to their campiness that means I don't buy into any of the characters, and for me that kills most films dead.

    Thirith on
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  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    Verhoeven is under-rated. Movies like Robocop and Starship Troopers are fantastic.

    Hacksaw
  • gjaustingjaustin Registered User regular
    Verhoeven is under-rated. Movies like Robocop and Starship Troopers are fantastic.

    Ehh, having watched Starship Troopers again recently (after an extended discussion in this thread), it really isn't that fantastic.

    It's about 15 minutes of social commentary, mixed with 30 minutes of a CW drama, and 60 minutes of senseless violence.

    Kana
  • BursarBursar Hee Noooo! Registered User regular
    A local theater showed the Rifftrax of "Manos: Hands of Fate" last night.

    Let's all take a moment to think that in this era of really flashy terrible movies, there were once movies that were incredibly awful while looking absolutely awful as well.

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  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    I never get the point of showing rifttrax in a theater. I mean who would want to pay those prices to be around the kind of people that want to watch rifttrax in a theater!

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
    shrykeRobos A Go Go
  • emp123emp123 Registered User regular
    gjaustin wrote: »
    Verhoeven is under-rated. Movies like Robocop and Starship Troopers are fantastic.

    Ehh, having watched Starship Troopers again recently (after an extended discussion in this thread), it really isn't that fantastic.

    It's about 15 minutes of social commentary, mixed with 30 minutes of a CW drama, and 60 minutes of senseless violence.

    You forgot nudity.

    I should really rewatch Starship Troopers, I haven't seen it in years. I did see the third one though and not even seeing the boobs of that lady from NipTuck could save it. It was beyond terrible.

    camo_sig2.png
  • wanderingwandering Registered User regular
    Watched the movie equivalent of Majora's Mask. No not Groundhog Day, the other one. Melancholia. It's good!

    The movie is divided into two parts, the second part is about an imminent planetary collision and that part is beautiful and nightmarish. The first part is about a wedding gone horribly wrong, and I dunno, it seemed a little over the top? I mean weddings are extra special occasions where people try to be on their best behavior, so even a little drizzle of dysfunction would have a big impact, but then this wedding features a torrential downpour and it felt like too much. The mother of the bride stands up to give this long nasty speech and I'm like, wouldn't it be better if instead the mother was mostly polite but said one subtly nasty thing? The part where the bride lets the groom know that she doesn't want to have sex right now has this nice amount of impact, but then Lars Von Trier turns the dysfunction knob up another twenty-seven notches and
    has the bride go and have sex with someone else on the lawn and...I dunno.
    I'll have I watch the movie again though I'm sure things went over my head.

    I like the part where the rich brother-in-law who has paid for everything confronts the bride about her behavior and he's like "do you know how much this wedding cost?" and then later the bride sees some abstract art books on display in the library and she's like grr stupid rich person art and she replaces the books with books on representational art.

    I also like the observation that sometimes, paradoxically, some things are easier for people who struggle with mental illness. As someone with anxiety problems this lines up with my experience. To Justine, the bride, the end of the world is no big deal because she has depression and it's felt like the end of the world for a long time.

  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    Just got back from Hansel and Gretl it was like a mid-evil version of supernatural just replace sam with a hot chick and dean with Jeremy Renner. So improvements in both areas.

    Much like Last Stand last week, what you see is what you get here and what you get is awesome if thats what you want.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
  • DanHibikiDanHibiki Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    the best thing about Hansel and Gretl was that we got this:




    DanHibiki on
  • Sangheili91Sangheili91 Registered User regular
    I rented Taken 2 tonight. Boy was that a mistake. It was bad. Very very bad. And I'm a big fan of the first Taken.

    Liam Neeson, bless his heart, does the best he can with what's here. He tries very hard to make something out of nothing with this incredibly bland script. Everyone else in the film, such as the ex-wife, the daughter who's supposedly like 16 but is very obviously thirty, and the forgettable villain, suck. Things happen in this movie just because. There are incredible leaps in logic on occasion. Lens flares abound for some reason. And the fight scenes, which I remember being pretty good in the first film, are absolutely terrible. The jump-cutting is ridiculous. The whole film reeks of pointlessness. I would avoid it at all costs.

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  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    The worst part Taken 2 was a commercial success, you'll be seeing Taken 3 in a couple years.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
  • shoeboxjeddyshoeboxjeddy Registered User regular
    Saw MIB3. It was uhh better than 2. Which is not saying much, 2 was just horrible. It makes me sad that the movie makers clearly don't understand their own franchise at all. Just basic points, like K and J were set up to have completely different working styles in the first movie. So of course the natural course of things would be to make J just a younger copy of K over time...

    The movie started filming without having the full script and it SHOWS. Like really badly. Things that you think are surely going to be meaningful aren't at all (O) and the big secret is dumb and hurts the series over all.
    The obvious guess from the start is that J will die saving K in the past. This is why K is sad, he knows that this will happen, but can't tell J not to come because then the Earth is fucked. He hasn't told anyone else this either, he made up some story when they asked. However, with some clever use of time travel, J subverts this outcome and things slightly change in the future to accommodate this new and better outcome (BttF in other words).

    This is what a competent script would have done. In this movie, K is sad because J's miraculously BLACK COLONEL DAD in charge of the moon launch in the 1960s (LOL) died randomly and then K had to take care of J, except he didn't he just abandoned him instantly so who cares.

    Other huge wasted opportunities or just points of confusion:
    -Why set up the jetpack in order to just skip to the next scene? Shouldn't you have a joke there, movie? And no, I refuse to count the 5th dimensional guy's hypothetical joke, that's stupid.
    -Shouldn't the time travel supplying guy have had a call back at the end?
    -The villain was just pointless and completely two dimensional. He was bad because he just was? At least Edgar the Bug's berserker button was something interesting, this guy's was just dumb. Where did the girl come from and why was she there and how did she have his weapon monster? If the prison "was built specifically for him", then why did it seem so ill prepared to handle his obvious escape plan of WALKING OUT?
    -Why set up MIB '60s racism against aliens (except for K) in exactly one scene, and then ignore it? And why do that at all when it runs counter to the backstory from the first movie?
    -Have the writers ever heard of Chekov's gun? You don't set up how backwards the MIB '60s tech is unless it's going to factor into the plot somehow. In fact, it worked just as well as current day tech, in several cases even being a better alternative. What the what? (Yes it's a comedy and it was a joke, but why time travel if the entire thing could play it the EXACT SAME WAY in the present day? What a huge waste.)
    -Why was K's behavior so nonsensical in the present day arc?
    In the end, we find out he was sad remembering what happens to J's dad
    but this runs completely counter to the way he was acting. First resigned, then frightened, then defeated. If he KNEW that the problem would involve time travel, then why did he bother drawing a gun on his door as if the guy was going to come for him? And
    the dude died very easily from being shot, so the whole idea of his massive threat was just stupid also.
    -How can Earth ban things in an intergalactic fashion? It is NOWHERE NEAR that powerful in this setting. All the good tech is directly borrowed from aliens and MIB is just a fancier version of customs + the diplomatic corps. This would be akin to the humans pre-Mass Effect 1 trying to pass an intergalactic law, except even more laughable.
    -The whole scene with the rotating motorcycle things broke MIB's "operate in secret" thing wide open. TOTALLY idiotic. What, did clean up go and neuralize every single driver from rush hour that day?
    -Remember how in the first movie "famous or strange person was an alien" was clever? Yeah, this movie did not remember that. Lawl, every model is an alien. Also umm Mick Jagger. Okay, good ones, that's a wrap people. We'll do the 'totally racist Asian bashing except it's not racist because he's an alien except it kinda still is' scene tomorrow.

  • emp123emp123 Registered User regular
    I caught like 75% of The Beach today and it was just as bad and way better than I remember. That movie is like the 90s personified. And jesus did Leonardo DiCaprio look young in it despite being 26. Dude looked like a 14 year old.

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  • AstaerethAstaereth In the belly of the beastRegistered User regular
    edited January 2013
    My favorite part of The Beach is the Crash Bandicoot-esque 1st-person video game segment, and by favorite I mean it was awful.

    My actual favorite part of The Beach is the beginning, because you could have spun a good story out of the first third or so, but then they didn't.

    Astaereth on
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