Internship e-mail reply.

MentalExerciseMentalExercise IndefenestrableRegistered User regular
Alright, so on the one hand I'm aware this is trivial.

On the other hand this is the internet!

So I'm replying to an e-mail offering me an interview for an internship. I'm addressed by my first name. Presumably my response would address the sender likewise. However as a student (even an old-ass man of a student), should I use his last name instead?

"More fish for Kunta!"

--LeVar Burton

Posts

  • minirhyderminirhyder BerlinRegistered User regular
    What does their signature say?

    I've always used first names without issue.

    Darkewolfe
  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    If their signature says Jim, address it to Jim. If it says Jim Smith, address it to Mr. Smith.

    What is this I don't even.
    cookiekrushEnc
  • cookiekrushcookiekrush Registered User regular
    I've always addressed with the Mr.,Mrs.,Miss. just to be safe. You're the one looking for the internship. Better to use honorifics unless they say, just address me by name.

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  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    Use Mr. Smith. Being a little extra respectful never hurts in these situations.

    bowen wrote: »
    The bacteria in your poop exist everywhere.
  • MalgarasMalgaras Registered User regular
    edited October 2013
    In general I go roughly by signature. For example:
    Hello Steve,

    Thank you for expressing interest in our internship program...
    ...
    ...We look forward to hearing from you.

    -Bill <--- A

    William Smith
    Intern Coordinator <---B
    555-123-4567

    If you get something more like A (or both A and B), I would use whatever they put, be it Bill or Will or William. If you only get B, I would go with Mr. Smith unless they specify otherwise.

    Malgaras on
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    alltheoliveDeebaser
  • MentalExerciseMentalExercise Indefenestrable Registered User regular
    Choose your own adventure update!:

    pg77:
    You replied using "Bob," to address your e-mail. Bob was exceptionally offended, and not only cancelled the interview, but he's gotten you blackballed from the entire IT industry! You now live in a van, down by the river.

    pg82:
    You replied using "Mr. Smith," to address your e-mail. He was so impressed with your tact that he actually forwarded your resume along to the CEO, and he was so impressed that despite your complete lack of job experience and an unfinished degree you've been offered a vice-president position making mid six figures and an oral sexratary, gender of your choosing.

    pg17:
    You replied using "Bob," to address your e-mail and he got back to you apologizing he can't fit your interview in until next weekend ending with an emoticon.

    "More fish for Kunta!"

    --LeVar Burton
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  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    If I sign my e-mail with

    Thanks,
    Darke

    rather thank

    Thanks,
    Darke Wolfe

    it is my intent to allow you to use my first name. When I don't think that's appropriate yet I sign the whole thing and expect a Mr. Wolfe.

    What is this I don't even.
    ArbitraryDescriptorDeebaser
  • CreaganCreagan Registered User regular
    If the person is a professor, always use the title unless you've also completed a graduate degree.

  • DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    edited October 2013
    This varies depending on where you are. In Australia, for example, nobody calls their boss Mr anything, no matter how junior they are and how senior he is.

    Dhalphir on
  • YoSoyTheWalrusYoSoyTheWalrus Registered User regular
    aaaand now I'm just imagining a bunch of Australians all yelling "Jim!" and "Murray!" at each other in their accents and it's delightful

    tumblr_mvlywyLVys1qigwg9o1_250.png
  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    aaaand now I'm just imagining a bunch of Australians all yelling "Jim!" "Bruce!" and "Murray!" "Bruce!" at each other in their accents and it's delightful

    bowen wrote: »
    The bacteria in your poop exist everywhere.
    EsseeArbitraryDescriptor
  • GdiguyGdiguy San Diego, CARegistered User regular
    edited October 2013
    Creagan wrote: »
    If the person is a professor, always use the title unless you've also completed a graduate degree.

    Again this depends; I'd always start an initial email with 'Prof.' or 'Dr.', but if they sign it "Bob" then that's what I'm going to use for future conversation. To me it's like being introduced to someone in person, having them say "it's Robert, but call me Bob", and you saying "ok Robert, it was good to meet you!".

    But it really depends on the field, and you just need a feeling for your particular field. In academia for biology (especially among anyone younger than 50), you'd actively be teased if you referred to your boss as "Dr. x", but I know other fields where it's much more common... so I think it's still best to over-address for the first communication, and then go by whatever they use.

    Gdiguy on
  • Dr. FrenchensteinDr. Frenchenstein Registered User regular
    I'd go with Mr. (or an honorific if applicable) regardless. You're not going to offend anyone by being a bit too formal. But you may offend someone if you aren't formal enough.

    LoveIsUnityLostNinjaGaslightArbitraryDescriptor
  • LostNinjaLostNinja Registered User regular
    I second what Dr. Frenchenstein said, you can't go wrong with using an honorific, whereas some people tend to feel slighted if it isn't used.

  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Agreed. I'm amused when applicants 'Mister' me, but I don't expect it.

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