I need Thermos so I dont have to eat bullshit at work.

IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
So as the title says, I need a thermos so I can take hot food to work. We don't have microwave and it is forbidden as the owner has decided that food smells arent good for the store.

I don't know what the best solution is. there are a bunch on Amazon, but the reviews are scattered and I'm worried I'm going to buy something too small for food, or not at all insulated. I need the food to stay hot for almost 5 hours, and I dont know if just an insulated lunch bag and normal Tupperware will accomplish that.

I realize there are a variety of cold options for lunch, but my temptation to get fast food overrides a cold cut sandwich.

Posts

  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    edited October 2013
    Looking up your question I came across this website, which emphasizes heating the soup up past how hot you'd heat it if you were going to eat it immediately, and recommends some thermos types:

    http://www.momables.com/how-long-is-it-safe-to-keep-food-hot-in-a-thermos/

    This link conflicts with a few thoughts in that one:

    http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/2012/11/26/how-to-use-thermos-food-jars/

    Darkewolfe on
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  • Dr. FrenchensteinDr. Frenchenstein Registered User regular
    i'm amazed food can be kept that long and remain hot/warm/whatever in anything, let alone multiple brands...

  • mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    a good thermos will. they make soup specific ones that you can just eat out of. i would look for a stainless steal one with glass vacumn

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  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    Goddamn, @Wassermelone, that's like a food carrying device from the future. Ordering one right now.

    I am in the business of saving lives.
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  • DrakeonDrakeon Registered User regular
    Man, I think I'm going to have to get one of those Zojirushi's too. That looks amazing. Wouldn't even have to use a Fridge at work.

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  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    @Wassermelone that looks perfect! Should I combo the container with some sort of insulated lunch box, or is it enough?

  • WassermeloneWassermelone Registered User regular
    You shouldn't need one I don't think! I has its own carrying case and is a bit bigger than you might think.

  • mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    i used to bring soup with me when i went ice climbing in a soup thermos.piping hot soup and tea after being outside in freezing condtions was always awesome

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  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    Trick to using a thermos is fill it with boiling water for a few minutes, poor the water out and then add the food.

  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON IndiaRegistered User regular
    dispatch.o wrote: »
    Trick to using a thermos is fill it with boiling water for a few minutes, poor the water out and then add the food.
    This site says that's bullshit.

  • cookiekrushcookiekrush Registered User regular
    My personal tidbit is that really invest in a good one. Some cheaper/knock off thermos leave a weird plastic taste in the food when it is left in there for so long. I've always preferred the vacuum ones, they always just kept better for me.

    The Zojirushi that is linked above looks pretty good. But read some of the reviews, it doesn't seem like all the layers have an insulated top. It's bento style, so it's very portioned.

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  • DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    edited November 2013
    dispatch.o wrote: »
    Trick to using a thermos is fill it with boiling water for a few minutes, poor the water out and then add the food.
    This site says that's bullshit.

    Yeah, except they did that test after having just pointed out that two identical looking thermoses lose heat at different rates, so unless they then swapped the two and tried the water test again it's not very informative.

    Edit: actually, I guess it's unclear. The "identical" thermoses in the first test do appear slightly different inside, and they later say identical, so maybe they're using different ones.

    Daenris on
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    The benefit of heating up a thermos before use is you're adding heat to the container's material.

    So if you have a metal container, you want to bring it up to the temperature of whatever you're storing it in so you don't lose heat to diffusion between the food and the cold container.

    If the inside of your thermos is metal or plastic, you'd probably want to heat it up. This is mostly a physics problem, since you've got to deal with heat transfer like radiation, convection, and conduction. The inside of the thermos should definitely be brought up to the temperature of the food if you're trying to get longevity of the heat.

    The vacuum/void space inside the thermos will mostly help with heat loss from the inside->out but you still want to avoid the diffusion of heat between food and surface, at the least. Though it's probably only a few degrees worth of heat, but that could mean a 45 minutes more "hot food" time.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    @cookiekrush do you have a particular one to recommend? My only hesitation on the Zojirushi is that I am far more likely to take one large portion of something than have four different things to pack.

  • cookiekrushcookiekrush Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    @cookiekrush do you have a particular one to recommend? My only hesitation on the Zojirushi is that I am far more likely to take one large portion of something than have four different things to pack.

    The ones I use are very old, like 5-10 years old that still work great. Although they started to get a plastic taste after being used so much... Maybe I need to upgrade to the stainless steel.

    Thermos - Stainless seems to get very good reviews. The 16 oz is rated better than the 24 oz because of the ease of eating. My older thermos are the thermos brand if that helps.

    What kind of hot foods are you considering, because that will help narrow down what kind of thermo you should be looking for.

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  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    I make alot of stews and fried rice/stirfry, and that will probably be the bulk of it.

  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    I used a Zojirushi thermos for coffee. I poured the full pot into the vacuum flask in the morning, and by 3pm (usually the last time I would want a cup of coffee), it was just warm. Not "cold warm" but actually still warm.

    Note that this was because I had a cup when I got to work, another one at lunchtime, and then finished it up at 3, meaning that there was a lot less liquid inside. My other two cups were hot and mostly hot. So, I think a good Zojirushi will do you fine.

    The Zojirushi linked above is technically overkill for what you need BUT the actual vacuum flask is the outside. The separate containers inside are just a bonus, and not actually a part of the vacuum flask. You could just dump your stew inside the big ol' thing and then clean it each time. Personally, though, I would use the big container to hold my lunch so that I could wash that by itself!

    Zappos does these goofy videos that show some of the details; here's theirs for the zojirushi: and another zojirushi:

    || Flickr — || PSN: EggyToast
  • CycloneRangerCycloneRanger Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    The benefit of heating up a thermos before use is you're adding heat to the container's material.

    So if you have a metal container, you want to bring it up to the temperature of whatever you're storing it in so you don't lose heat to diffusion between the food and the cold container.

    If the inside of your thermos is metal or plastic, you'd probably want to heat it up. This is mostly a physics problem, since you've got to deal with heat transfer like radiation, convection, and conduction. The inside of the thermos should definitely be brought up to the temperature of the food if you're trying to get longevity of the heat.

    The vacuum/void space inside the thermos will mostly help with heat loss from the inside->out but you still want to avoid the diffusion of heat between food and surface, at the least. Though it's probably only a few degrees worth of heat, but that could mean a 45 minutes more "hot food" time.
    The heat capacity of the thin metal inner wall of a thermos is probably negligible compared to the water-heavy food you're putting inside it. I would not expect heating it up beforehand to do anything noticeable at all. I'd wager that putting the lid on quickly will save you more joules.

    DevoutlyApatheticalltheolive
  • cookiekrushcookiekrush Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    I make alot of stews and fried rice/stirfry, and that will probably be the bulk of it.
    Def a bowl type of thermo would be best with a wide opening, unless you bring a separate bowl to eat from (Though, most have the lid you can use as a bowl). Technically you could use "liquid" thermos, but it'd be a super pain to clean and get food in and out of.

    Here is a few bowl ones I found on Amazon. Thermos and Zojirushi are pretty solid brands. Zojirushi 11 oz. Thermos 10 oz.

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  • WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    Do NOT drop your thermos! even the most top of the line ones, will be paperweights if that inside layer smashes, and it's a delicate layer

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  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    i'm amazed food can be kept that long and remain hot/warm/whatever in anything, let alone multiple brands...

    I used to have a Thermos coffee mug and this is actually something I forgot a couple times.

    Burning your mouth on scalding hot coffee hours after filling the container helps assure you it can be done right quick.

  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    With regards to filling and preheating, I would imagine it depends on what the inner layer is constructed of as to whether it helps.

    I used a durable as shit (as in, had dents and everything in it from being knocked over and dropped) Stanley thermos that didn't have glass or ceramic as the inner cylinder.

    I'm not really a fan of the glass or other breakable interior spaces on most "high tech" thermos design. They can break just from setting it down wrong.

  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    When in doubt, Zojirushi.

    Echo wrote: »
    Something working on the first try is a source of great suspicion.
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  • chr1sh4ll3ttb3chr1sh4ll3ttb3 A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Do NOT drop your thermos! even the most top of the line ones, will be paperweights if that inside layer smashes, and it's a delicate layer

    I haven't personally seen a glass thermos since I was a little boy, and broke my Mum's old thermos from when she was a girl. So, 25 years ago. Stainless thermoses are pretty rugged.

    Quid
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    The benefit of heating up a thermos before use is you're adding heat to the container's material.

    So if you have a metal container, you want to bring it up to the temperature of whatever you're storing it in so you don't lose heat to diffusion between the food and the cold container.

    If the inside of your thermos is metal or plastic, you'd probably want to heat it up. This is mostly a physics problem, since you've got to deal with heat transfer like radiation, convection, and conduction. The inside of the thermos should definitely be brought up to the temperature of the food if you're trying to get longevity of the heat.

    The vacuum/void space inside the thermos will mostly help with heat loss from the inside->out but you still want to avoid the diffusion of heat between food and surface, at the least. Though it's probably only a few degrees worth of heat, but that could mean a 45 minutes more "hot food" time.
    The heat capacity of the thin metal inner wall of a thermos is probably negligible compared to the water-heavy food you're putting inside it. I would not expect heating it up beforehand to do anything noticeable at all. I'd wager that putting the lid on quickly will save you more joules.

    No doubt. We're talking fractions of a degree at this point.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
    chr1sh4ll3ttb3Quid
  • Mego ThorMego Thor "I say thee...NAY!" Registered User regular
    Not a Thermos, but if you have access to a plug-in, this little beauty does a fantastic job of heating up left-overs;

    http://www.amazon.com/Crock-Pot-SCCPLC200-R-20-Ounce-Lunch-Warmer/dp/B006H5V8US/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1383598710&sr=8-1&keywords=crockpot+lunch+warmer+red

    The outside barely gets warm, but after a couple of hours food is piping hot and dee-licious.

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