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Dead media server help!

WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
So, for about the last 6 years I have been enjoying my Acer Aspire AH340-UA230N Home Server A few weeks ago a transformer blew outside of my apt complex and the power surge fried the network card and god knows what else. I have it loaded with 7 TB of data ( tax stuff, old photos, system back ups for all the computers in the house, music, personal art stuff, etc, etc). The problem is that the only way to get to it is via network in or windows home server consol,e as it has no video output. Since the network card is shot I cant do much. I took it to a local repair shop and they said they cant do anything since it has no video output.

My question is since I am running folder duplication on it (I forget what Raid exactly its running) and its running Windows Home server, if I picked up a new case for it and moved the hard drives over, do you think it would boot and I would be able to recover the data?
Suggestions on how to get that delicious data off the drives, or if anyone has been in the same boat and tried something like plugging the drives into another box running FreeNAS? Any suggestions would help greatly. =)

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Posts

  • Apothe0sisApothe0sis Have you ever questioned the nature of your reality? Registered User regular
    I couldn't say for sure. It's risky/difficult to get other controllers to recognise an existing RAID.

    Your best bet may be getting another empty NAS of the same model and moving the drives into it.

    FreeNAS would be my hail mary.

    Tide goes in. Tide goes out.
    Es-annon NEVA 4GET
  • FoomyFoomy Registered User regular
    It shouldnt hurt anything to try and take te drives out and stick them in another machine to see if it can read them.

    You could also try a usb wired network adapter, theres a fair chance windows will automatically detect it and use it.

    Steam Profile: FoomyFooms
    Apothe0sisAioua
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    I found the service manual for it.

    According to this there is a PCIe 4x slot on the board that isn't used. Worst case scenario, you can probably half-disassemble it, slot a new NIC into there, and boot the thing up.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
  • FoomyFoomy Registered User regular
    edited April 2014
    Aioua wrote: »
    I found the service manual for it.

    According to this there is a PCIe 4x slot on the board that isn't used. Worst case scenario, you can probably half-disassemble it, slot a new NIC into there, and boot the thing up.

    I would stick a spare gpu if you have one into it, Probably easier to do tests that way to see what is dead.

    Foomy on
    Steam Profile: FoomyFooms
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    Foomy wrote: »
    Aioua wrote: »
    I found the service manual for it.

    According to this there is a PCIe 4x slot on the board that isn't used. Worst case scenario, you can probably half-disassemble it, slot a new NIC into there, and boot the thing up.

    I would stick a spare gpu if you have one into it, Probably easier to do tests that way to see what is dead.

    Oh right, duh.

    Though I wouldn't imagine most home users have a 1x or 4x gpu.
    Though, for that matter, most home users aren't going to have a discrete NIC, either.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    edited April 2014
    Converting_a_7800GT.jpg

    Edit: I am not condoning or suggesting anyone do this...

    LD50 on
    Aioua
  • FoomyFoomy Registered User regular
    Aioua wrote: »
    Foomy wrote: »
    Aioua wrote: »
    I found the service manual for it.

    According to this there is a PCIe 4x slot on the board that isn't used. Worst case scenario, you can probably half-disassemble it, slot a new NIC into there, and boot the thing up.

    I would stick a spare gpu if you have one into it, Probably easier to do tests that way to see what is dead.

    Oh right, duh.

    Though I wouldn't imagine most home users have a 1x or 4x gpu.
    Though, for that matter, most home users aren't going to have a discrete NIC, either.

    most pcie 4x slots are open ended, and will take any pcie gpu just fine. The gpu will run slower, but that doesn't matter when all you need is desktop output.

    So really just need to have an old gpu or a friend who still has one lying around somewhere, a much more likely scenario then a nic card.

    Steam Profile: FoomyFooms
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    Foomy wrote: »
    Aioua wrote: »
    Foomy wrote: »
    Aioua wrote: »
    I found the service manual for it.

    According to this there is a PCIe 4x slot on the board that isn't used. Worst case scenario, you can probably half-disassemble it, slot a new NIC into there, and boot the thing up.

    I would stick a spare gpu if you have one into it, Probably easier to do tests that way to see what is dead.

    Oh right, duh.

    Though I wouldn't imagine most home users have a 1x or 4x gpu.
    Though, for that matter, most home users aren't going to have a discrete NIC, either.

    most pcie 4x slots are open ended, and will take any pcie gpu just fine. The gpu will run slower, but that doesn't matter when all you need is desktop output.

    So really just need to have an old gpu or a friend who still has one lying around somewhere, a much more likely scenario then a nic card.

    If they're not you can cut them open. Works just as well as clipping the pins off the end of your card.

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