As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/

Brian Vaughan's Pride of Baghdad

13»

Posts

  • Kuribo's ShoeKuribo's Shoe Kuribo's Stocking North PoleRegistered User regular
    edited October 2006
    how often does that happen, servo

    really

    how often

    Kuribo's Shoe on
    xmassig2.gif
  • Toji SuzuharaToji Suzuhara Southern CaliforniaRegistered User regular
    edited October 2006
    how often does that happen, servo

    really

    how often

    What if you just wanted to talk about Roland Barthes? What then?
    Keith wrote:
    D&D :arrow:

    LAME.

    Toji Suzuhara on
    AlphaFlag_200x40.jpg
  • ServoServo Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited October 2006
    how often does that happen, servo

    really

    how often

    plenty, i think!


    for instance, i think the scott pilgrim books are post-modern

    Servo on
    newsigs.jpg
  • TerrorbyteTerrorbyte __BANNED USERS
    edited October 2006
    Postmodern in the sense that it deconstructs the good vs. evil dichotomy by having humanity not only fighting against itself, but a "super-humanity" in the Cylons. The humans are being treated by this external entity, within the context of our own history, in a manner that humans have treated humans. Subjectivity is also questioned by having humans and Cylons both capable of truly horrific tasks and rationalizing them. Also, the series reflects on modernity from a detached position - the third season premiere recalled every conflict from the early British colonial period to the Iraq War, all under the guise of a science fiction world that is not as different as we'd like it to be from our own.

    It's not a term I throw around loosely, but I think it fits.

    Terrorbyte on
  • Mai-KeroMai-Kero Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    Terrorbyte wrote:
    Postmodern in the sense that it deconstructs the good vs. evil dichotomy by having humanity not only fighting against itself, but a "super-humanity" in the Cylons. The humans are being treated by this external entity, within the context of our own history, in a manner that humans have treated humans. Subjectivity is also questioned by having humans and Cylons both capable of truly horrific tasks and rationalizing them. Also, the series reflects on modernity from a detached position - the third season premiere recalled every conflict from the early British colonial period to the Iraq War, all under the guise of a science fiction world that is not as different as we'd like it to be from our own.

    It's not a term I throw around loosely, but I think it fits.

    Well I guess you're wrong, jackass.

    Mai-Kero on
  • Garlic BreadGarlic Bread Registered User, Disagreeable regular
    edited October 2006
    Keith wrote:
    D&D :arrow:

    LAME.

    :arrow:

    Garlic Bread on
  • Target PracticeTarget Practice Registered User
    edited October 2006
    Servo wrote:
    or when something is y'know actually postmodern
    Generally speaking, I write off anything actually postmodern as not worth reading.

    Or watching. Or whatever.

    Target Practice on
    sig.gif
  • ServoServo Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited October 2006
    Servo wrote:
    or when something is y'know actually postmodern
    Generally speaking, I write off anything actually postmodern as not worth reading.

    Or watching. Or whatever.

    ssssssccccccccooooooootttttttt piiiiiiiiilllllllllgrrrrrrrrriiiiiiiiiimmmmmm!

    Servo on
    newsigs.jpg
  • GigatonGigaton Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    This is so awesome, I just met BKV in New York (Midtown Comics) and he signed my copy of Pride and the Runaways hardcover. I thought he was going to be really sarcastic like he is on his blog, be he pretty nice and seemed genuinely interested in his fanbase.

    There was even an interview that was conducted for Pop Culture Shock in front of the line and he mentioned that he read Whedon's first Runaways script and loved it. Not to mention that Pop Culture did like 30 second interviews with everyone in the line so I might be on the video that they end up showing!

    Gigaton on
  • hughtronhughtron __BANNED USERS
    edited October 2006
    Guys, Watchmen is kind of post-modern. Everybody loves that.

    I think that the term 'post-modern' is kind of lame, but it's not the post-modernists fault completely. The jackasses who came before them decided things were 'modern.'

    hughtron on
    minisy3.gif
  • Herr CaesarHerr Caesar Registered User
    edited October 2006
    I was expecting the lions would not speak English so well. I was hoping for a more WE3-esque style of speech.

    Aw well. It's only a minor dissapointment in an otherwise phenominal read, Seriously, get this book.

    Herr Caesar on
    civbandit.jpg
  • AccualtAccualt Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    This is a sad, sad tale/tail of wwoooeee.

    Why did you guys suggest I read it?
    Because it was wonderful? Okay, I can except that. I thought it was pretty good but without the lovely art I think it would have fallen a bit flat.
    The [spoiler:b0279f380a]lions running a train on one-eye[/spoiler:b0279f380a] made me feel like a bad person, damn anthropomorphic animals.

    Accualt on
  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    Accualt wrote:
    The [spoiler:c0b34fbd8b]lions running a train on one-eye[/spoiler:c0b34fbd8b] made me feel like a bad person, damn anthropomorphic animals.

    Seriously, this was my one problem with the book. It seems like, for whatever reason, any graphic novel/comic that has much critical acclaim has to have at least one sexual assault in it. It just seemed sort of pointless.

    All in all it was a very good story though, with some truly beautiful art.

    Munch on
Sign In or Register to comment.