Looking for my last job.

funkyfreshfunkyfresh Registered User new member
Hi guys, I'm just looking for someone that can point me in the right direction if there even is one. I was looking at a Pax application opening for enforcers and I realized that the gaming industry is one of those industries that I could work in that wouldn't feel like a "job". I'm a 36 year old male that has been gaming since I can remember. My first console was an Intellivision.

I'm at the point in my life where I'm more interested in the industry and watching people enjoy it more than I actually play the games themselves. I have an extensive background in customer service and management and am sure my skills can be effectively utilized in this industry. I suppose I could go apply at my local gamestop or something like that but I'm looking for something more.

My first thought is that it would be amazing to be able to travel to these Pax locations and use my skills there to keep things in line for staff and Attendees alike.

Well anyway, any ideas on how and where I can follow my dream job?

Thanks in advance!

Posts

  • The Crowing OneThe Crowing One Registered User regular
    If you can't code/art, you're likely looking at the "people" side of stuffs. That means, generally, things like Community Management or working as an in-game GM (and others). If you have any related skills, you could set your sights on the business/marketing/project management side.

    Your best bet as a greenhorn is likely to approach smaller indies (particularly those who crowdfund) and try to find yourself a volunteer position somewhere. This isn't that tough. Stepping, green, into a paid game industry position is unlikely. Smaller indies often utilize remote employees and are more welcoming of those without specific industry experience. The other suggestion is to familiarize yourself with local studios and just keep an eye on their "now hiring" page and apply as soon as something comes up. Taken together is the best case: volunteer and gain experience you can use to climb into a paid position down the line when it opens. And remember that there are way more people on the "people-side" of the industry than there are jobs. However, that said, social/people skills tend to be highly sought after in the games industry due to the general lack of such amongst the more hardcore coding crowd.

    Most of all, the game industry is absolutely a job. Usually, it is way more of a job than anything 9-5. If you're serious, then be prepared for a long road and a lot of work along the way.

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  • minirhyderminirhyder BerlinRegistered User regular
    edited November 2015
    The game industry kinda sucks.
    Not to say you can't be happy in it, you certainly can! It's fun, interesting, and engaging to be in as a career.

    However, you will be working long hours, won't feel 100% secure (as layoffs are incredibly common), and artistic direction often changes at the whim of the big wigs, who often aren't even game industry veterans, but just people who've run various types of businesses during their careers.

    I would say before you embark on the journey to get into the industry, read about some downsides of the industry and some employee testimonials, as the lows can be really brutal.

    I've worked in the industry for two years and I can't say I'm dying to go back. YMMV.

    minirhyder on
  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    The industry is better now than it was before. The long-hour thing only seems to apply if you are in QA or coding, as everyone else seems to take normal work days, and even then, that has gotten better. But yeah, it's a job, more than anything else. The shine of being around video games a lot wears off pretty quickly.

    The main part is being around coworkers who actually "get" what you are talking about, which can be cool. But jobs in the industry have the exact same office drama that all other jobs have.

    While some aspects of applying for a management/supply job in the industry are unique to the industry, for the most part, it's just like any other job application. You apply to the HR of whatever company you want, get interviewed, and send in your resume. Most management/supply jobs do NOT require prior experience in the video game industry, although good references can help.

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    PSN: Hahnsoo | MHGU: Hahnsoo, Switch FC: SW-0085-2679-5212
    Zombie Gandhi
  • The Crowing OneThe Crowing One Registered User regular
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    Most management/supply jobs do NOT require prior experience in the video game industry, although good references can help.

    But not having that experience will place you under those who do, generally speaking.

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    spool32
  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    Most management/supply jobs do NOT require prior experience in the video game industry, although good references can help.

    But not having that experience will place you under those who do, generally speaking.
    Depends on the company that you apply to. Most of the management/supply chain/PR guys come from successful careers in non-video game-related media places. They want people with experience, but it doesn't have to be for a video game-related media field.

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    PSN: Hahnsoo | MHGU: Hahnsoo, Switch FC: SW-0085-2679-5212
  • The Crowing OneThe Crowing One Registered User regular
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    Most of the management/supply chain/PR guys come from successful careers in non-video game-related media places. They want people with experience, but it doesn't have to be for a video game-related media field.

    Yep. I was speaking generally. Having a background in CS and Management places one in a place where CM and GM-esqe positions show background. Maybe Project Management if you take the risk and get in soon enough. In any case I don't believe the OP has any media experience per their post, so I think it is a worthwhile element to mention that experience is needed if there is none currently.

    My source is that I did this, myself, last year. Similar background and a Romantic desire to work in games.

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  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    Okay so! This is actually something I know a little bit about. I spoke extensively about this with a woman who managed PR for a big company that runs booths at PAX and around the world.

    Things you will need to be to work at or operate one of those things professionally (which sounds like what you are actually looking for):

    -super extroverted
    -able to draw people into having a good time around you
    -very self-motivated
    -ORGANIZED

    If you can show someone that you are those things, and you have experience with customer service and management and ALSO speak the lingo, you should be a shoo-in for a booth position for game companies that have those. It really sounds like everything you want, and it's possible! You're going to have to do a lot of legwork and be impressive, but confidence is key in going for a people-facing position like that.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    schuss
  • The Crowing OneThe Crowing One Registered User regular
    ceres wrote: »
    If you can show someone that you are those things, and you have experience with customer service and management and ALSO speak the lingo, you should be a shoo-in for a booth position for game companies that have those. It really sounds like everything you want, and it's possible! You're going to have to do a lot of legwork and be impressive, but confidence is key in going for a people-facing position like that.

    This 1000%.

    But don't think it won't suck like a real job... because it will. There's nothing Romantic about working an industry known for layoffs and job insecurity.

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    Cambiata
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    ceres wrote: »
    If you can show someone that you are those things, and you have experience with customer service and management and ALSO speak the lingo, you should be a shoo-in for a booth position for game companies that have those. It really sounds like everything you want, and it's possible! You're going to have to do a lot of legwork and be impressive, but confidence is key in going for a people-facing position like that.

    This 1000%.

    But don't think it won't suck like a real job... because it will. There's nothing Romantic about working an industry known for layoffs and job insecurity.

    Yes, and tradeshows/PR can be an endless suckfest if you don't LOVE talking to people. You will be answering the same questions continuously. You will get asinine questions you have to answer sweetly. You will be setting up a booth, interacting for 16 hours in the show and at afterparties being "on", getting 5 hours of sleep and doing that all over again (just replace setup with takedown at the end of the day).
    Then you'll do that a bunch more times throughout the year. It requires discipline, organization, extroversion and endurance.
    If you watch some of the old PATV's on PAX, it should give you an idea of the sorts of things that are involved, like finding forklifts or trucks after everything is closed.
    I used to help organize, run and present at a business conference. I miss some parts of it, but it would take a solid week to recover every time after doing setup at 7 AM through social time with customers that ended at 1-2 AM for 3 days.

  • hsuhsu Registered User regular
    If you talk to booth bunnies at PAX, they fall into 3 categories:
    1. Hired a week before, specifically for PAX
    2. Long term developer or marketing employee of the gaming company, where employees rotate between conventions
    3. Employee of a convention company, under contract by the gaming company, who's job is to travel from convention to convention handling details

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