Possibly Moving to a job in Irving Texas... How bad is it?

DisenchanterDisenchanter Magnolia, DERegistered User regular
So, company I work for is expanding their footprint in Irving, and the work I do is part of said expansion, so new opening and advancement opportunity.

My question is, before accepting a job that far away (I live in the NJ,PA,DE area), what is it like there? Cost of living?

I mean a good search tells you the stuff they want you to know, but do we have anyone local or close on here?

Posts

  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    Depends on exactly where you want to live, but in comparison with NJ/PA/DE, the cost of living is far less onerous. Texas also has no state income tax, so if your pay stays the same you'll keep more in your pocket.

    Housing prices are on the rise in DFW, but unless you want to live in an area similar to Bryn Mawr, you probably won't notice if you're just interested in a nice, clean area.

    bowenCambiata
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Even on the rise, it's probably something like 50% cheaper.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
    Cambiata
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    What company? Just curious if we work for the same place...

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    The worst part for you will probably be the weather change and the sprawl. Otherwise you're in a well developed area right by Dallas so there's plenty to do and see.

    Like others have said cost of living will be significantly lower.

    CambiataCelestialBadgerspool32
  • DisenchanterDisenchanter Magnolia, DERegistered User regular
    Wait you mean no crap ass biting cold winters??

    bowen
  • MaggieTheCatMaggieTheCat Registered User regular
    I think Dallas area might get snow/ice once or twice a year. Might. And I think the city usually shuts down when they do because people freak out and don't know how to drive or function in that kind of weather. I'm in San Antonio and we get snow/ice once every few years and the whole city just goes berserk when it happens. I think Dallas is more likely to get it a little more often so maybe they are more adept at handling it?

    But be prepared for the heat. We are getting ready to go to A-Kon, the biggest anime convention in Texas, next weekend, and planning for outdoor photoshoots is kind of hell. Everyone is warned to drink tons of water and try to stay in the shade as much as possible to avoid dehydration and heatstroke. It's already been in the 90s.

  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    Dallasite here.

    As mentioned above, the biggest adjustment will probably be the weather, specially the summers. Traffic can also suck, but it's way better than a lot of similar size cities, and nowhere near as bad as Houston or Austin.

    Cost of living is relatively low I believe.

    There is TONS of stuff to do. I run a local meetup group so I gotten the chance to know the city really well, so ask away if you're wondering about anything.

    Cambiataspool32
  • DarklyreDarklyre Registered User regular
    Be prepared for the sprawl - in other words, you'd better buy a car (if you don't already have one) and get it up to par in terms of maintenance, because the last thing you want is a breakdown on the side of the highway in the middle of the summer heat.

    Cambiata
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Wait you mean no crap ass biting cold winters??

    No crap ass biting winters. Instead crap ass sweltering summers. I'd say both suck in their own unique ways but that's me.

    Local H JayDisenchanterElvenshaeAngelHedgiePanda4YouTofystedethKristmas KthulhuIlpala
  • DisenchanterDisenchanter Magnolia, DERegistered User regular
    I used to go between spending summers in Cocoa Beach Florida and San Antonio Texas, so heat doesn't kill me, but really tired of winter.

    bowenLostNinjaspool32
  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    It can get cold for sure. Just not to the extent it might in more northern areas. Texas is a plains state after all.

    But the wind from the south for at least half the year really pushes the humidity up past all reason. Visiting here on vacation isn't the same as living through it.

    Elvenshae
  • useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    I moved to Irving (Valley Ranch to be specific) and worked outside in a year with over 30 days straight with temps over 100.
    You are not prepared for the heat.

    I miss it though.

  • VisskarVisskar Blam! Murdered you!Registered User regular
    If you're looking at a house, the market here is a little crazy right now due to numerous big corporations from both coasts moving here lately. We bought our first house last year, on the northern side of the metroplex in the Lewisville/Flower Mound area. Houses were closing in just a few days after going on the market, most of the time to offers thousands over asking. As a local, its hard to compete with Californians coming in used to inflated property values. So if you find something you like, don't hesitate and don't lowball with hopes to negotiate.

    steam_sig.png
    Cambiata
  • CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    edited May 2016
    Visskar wrote: »
    If you're looking at a house, the market here is a little crazy right now due to numerous big corporations from both coasts moving here lately. We bought our first house last year, on the northern side of the metroplex in the Lewisville/Flower Mound area. Houses were closing in just a few days after going on the market, most of the time to offers thousands over asking. As a local, its hard to compete with Californians coming in used to inflated property values. So if you find something you like, don't hesitate and don't lowball with hopes to negotiate.

    Seconded. I also bought my house last year and every house I put a bid on (even at least one that was unofficially accepted) went to other people until I got one by going 10k over the asking price. I'm sure folks in other regions will scoff at how "low" that is, but for this area we're used to getting 5k or more less than asking price. I've also kept up a little on the market since I bought and houses are still showing "pending" within days of going up. If people ask for an unusually high price on their house, they do have to wait longer but they eventually get their asking price. For comparison to other areas (where housing might be more expensive) I bought a house built in the 90s for 140k. If I had approached a builder, I couldn't get a new house built for less than $180k.

    Rental market is just as bad - places I used to could get for $900/mo are at $1200/mo and rising. That's part of the reason I bought instead of renting again, I was tired of the prices being jacked up every year. At least this way my money's going into equity.

    As far as Irving proper goes, south of Los Colinas is probably one of the cheapest areas to rent or buy, but the corollary to that is that it's all older houses and apartments (we're talking built in the 1970s). If you go into Los Colinas and Valley Ranch, you're looking at some of the most expensive housing in the area. I personally work in Irving and live in Garland, and most of the people I work with have similarly long commutes (Arlington, Keller, even a few people in Forney).

    Edit: I meant to add that general cost of living is low. Gas is currently at $1.91 if you can find the right gas station, grocery costs are also below average for the nation, IIRC.

    Cambiata on
    Chall
  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    I'm currently in Irving and work near Garland. Small World!

    That said, I'm generally benefiting from going opposite of rush hour traffic. But the sprawl of this mess makes me long for SoCal freeways. Signage, when it bothers to exist, is mostly useless. And it just plain surprises me how utterly brainless most drivers are here. If you're the type who likes mass transit or 'walkable' areas, you'll be disappointed.

    It's not really horrible here, but I feel you have to be in a better place than I am to enjoy it.

    But, yeah. The cost of living is generally low.

    Cambiata
  • TofystedethTofystedeth veni, veneri, vamoosi Registered User regular
    I think Dallas area might get snow/ice once or twice a year. Might. And I think the city usually shuts down when they do because people freak out and don't know how to drive or function in that kind of weather. I'm in San Antonio and we get snow/ice once every few years and the whole city just goes berserk when it happens. I think Dallas is more likely to get it a little more often so maybe they are more adept at handling it?

    Unfortunately this is not the case. Rain also causes people to forget how stoplights work.

    steam_sig.png
    CambiataKyouguElvenshaeMysst
  • Forbe!Forbe! Registered User regular
    I live in Tulsa, OK, and travel down to Dallas/FW area for work a few weeks every couple months. Tulsa/Dallas climate is similar, though I would say Dallas/FW area is in general a bit warmer. Temperatures in the summer can poke past 100, with absurd humidity. Traffic on the inter-disperal loops can be awful, especially around rush hour. After traveling there 3 or 4 dozen times in the past 5 years, it appears that the interstate is in a constant state of construction. I can confirm, they do not handle winter weather well, but there isn't much of it in my experience, so it doesn't seem to be a huge deal, unless you fly a bunch. I've been stranded in the DFW airport on a few occasions (because of what amounted to under an inch of snow/slush), including once overnight.

    K, well thats the bad. What's the good?

    There is a TON to do. Dallas/FW are very separate cities, that have grown into a blob. They aren't super far from each other, and each has it's own quirks. The food is great. Like many other neighboring states in oil country, fuel prices are pretty cheap. I do not rent there, so I cannot speak at all on the housing situation. I'm originally from the upper midwest, and people from Texas/Oklahoma in general, seem much more friendly.

    bv2ylq8pac8s.png
  • TofystedethTofystedeth veni, veneri, vamoosi Registered User regular
    edited June 2016
    I will say, that while traffic in Dallas is pretty awful sometimes most of the time, the DART system is pretty thorough in Dallas itself, and the light rail has extensions out into some of the suburbs. Not sure what it's like in Irving these days, but when I was growing up in Dallas proper I was able to get almost anywhere I needed to go by bus and light rail.

    Tofystedeth on
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  • HeirHeir Registered User regular
    Not sure on your political and cultural leanings...but Texas might be a bit...different than what you're used to.

    Lived in TX for 20 years and never got used to how loud, proud, and opinionated people were there.

    camo_sig2.png
    Great Scott
  • DisenchanterDisenchanter Magnolia, DERegistered User regular
    Heir wrote: »
    Not sure on your political and cultural leanings...but Texas might be a bit...different than what you're used to.

    Lived in TX for 20 years and never got used to how loud, proud, and opinionated people were there.

    Yeah, I am well aware that my heathen Democratic leaning ways may not fit as well, lol.

    Great Scott
  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    Dallas proper, and likely to a slightly lesser extent the rest of DFW, is about as politically diverse as any other metropolitan hub. Doesn't really change that statewide leans hard right.

    You will encounter more than enough people you disagree with. So, yeah.

    Cambiata
  • HeirHeir Registered User regular
    Oh definitely, DFW isn't that terrible...it's not quite Austin when it comes to "liberal paradise" towns, but it's not Beaumont, TX.

    That said, people take a weird (to me) pride in the state of Texas that even after 20 years I found obnoxious and kind of unavoidable. It's not a deal breaker, I just always let new transplants know it's kind of a thing. :biggrin:

    camo_sig2.png
    CambiataMysst
  • CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    edited June 2016
    Heir wrote: »
    Oh definitely, DFW isn't that terrible...it's not quite Austin when it comes to "liberal paradise" towns, but it's not Beaumont, TX.

    That said, people take a weird (to me) pride in the state of Texas that even after 20 years I found obnoxious and kind of unavoidable. It's not a deal breaker, I just always let new transplants know it's kind of a thing. :biggrin:

    As someone who's lived in Texas all my life, I've always found it more than a little amusing that some "Texas pride" folks take the slogan "Don't Mess With Texas" as, like, lore from the ancients. When it was actually came from a series of commercials by the Texas department of transportation to reduce littering. I guess TxDOT really knows their audience.

    Edit: True story about this, when I was growing up seeing more and more "don't mess with Texas" bumper stickers and the like, I used to think "wow, it's amazing how many people in Texas care about ending littering!" ha ha.

    Cambiata on
    HeirTofystedeth
  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    Ha ha.

    I used to have one of those insulated drinking cups from back in the days when they first started the program. Pretty sure I still had it up to about four years ago.

    Everything is bigger in Texas. Mostly just egos, though.

    Heir
  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    I remembered what I was thinking about earlier this week.

    Another difference about Texas you might not have in the tri-state area are the blue laws. Beer and wine may be purchased at grocery stores seven days a week*, but hard liquor such as whiskey or vodka can only be purchased at designated liquor stores. But not on Sunday.

    And I remember when I had visited the state when I was a kid they definitely had drive-thru liquor stores out in the boonies. So...yeah.

    If you're the type that really wants to get liquored up on a Sunday, just stock up beforehand. God only frowns on buying it on Sunday.




    *I presume this since I don't really drink and have never felt the urge to buy shitty beer on a Sunday.

    Heir
  • CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    Irving itself used to be a dry city, but I'm pretty sure they voted to make it wet while I still lived there. But yeah, no liquor at all can be purchased on Sunday.

  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    On the plus side, DFW has an amazing craft beer scene. Some fantastic breweries and tons of great bars.

  • Sir CarcassSir Carcass I have been shown the end of my world Round Rock, TXRegistered User regular
    I remembered what I was thinking about earlier this week.

    Another difference about Texas you might not have in the tri-state area are the blue laws. Beer and wine may be purchased at grocery stores seven days a week*, but hard liquor such as whiskey or vodka can only be purchased at designated liquor stores. But not on Sunday.

    And I remember when I had visited the state when I was a kid they definitely had drive-thru liquor stores out in the boonies. So...yeah.

    If you're the type that really wants to get liquored up on a Sunday, just stock up beforehand. God only frowns on buying it on Sunday.




    *I presume this since I don't really drink and have never felt the urge to buy shitty beer on a Sunday.

    I believe the law is you can't purchase anything between 2am and 8am all week, no hard liquor before noon all week, and on Sundays only beer after noon.

    Another great one is that a car dealership can be open Saturday or Sunday, but not both.

    Yay, blue laws.

  • Darth WaiterDarth Waiter Elrond Hubbard Mordor XenuRegistered User regular
    Kyougu wrote: »
    On the plus side, DFW has an amazing craft beer scene. Some fantastic breweries and tons of great bars.

    The Fraconia brewery is run by a german ex-pat named Dennis and he makes damn good beer.

  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    I remembered what I was thinking about earlier this week.

    Another difference about Texas you might not have in the tri-state area are the blue laws. Beer and wine may be purchased at grocery stores seven days a week*, but hard liquor such as whiskey or vodka can only be purchased at designated liquor stores. But not on Sunday.

    And I remember when I had visited the state when I was a kid they definitely had drive-thru liquor stores out in the boonies. So...yeah.

    If you're the type that really wants to get liquored up on a Sunday, just stock up beforehand. God only frowns on buying it on Sunday.




    *I presume this since I don't really drink and have never felt the urge to buy shitty beer on a Sunday.

    I believe the law is you can't purchase anything between 2am and 8am all week, no hard liquor before noon all week, and on Sundays only beer after noon.

    Another great one is that a car dealership can be open Saturday or Sunday, but not both.

    Yay, blue laws.

    I'll take your word for it, alkie!

  • xThanatoSxxThanatoSx Registered User regular
    I'll chime in late on this as well.

    My wife and I moved to the DFW area from California about 2 years ago because I got a job here. Cost of living, while it has gotten higher in the last 2 years, is still lower than we were used to in California.

    However, the lack of income tax gets made up by the property taxes if you own a home. Literally the only thing I really miss is the 1ish% property taxes (versus 2.5%+).

    Overall though, neither of us regret the move.

  • DisenchanterDisenchanter Magnolia, DERegistered User regular
    Blue Laws are not a new one for me, Pennsylvania has a bunch of odd ones, liquor can only be bought at liquor stores, beer can only be purchased at packaged good stores. No selling cars on Sunday, period. Lots of little ones you trip over here and there.

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